Heavy Harrows - The Combine Forum
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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-11-2011, 08:38 PM Thread Starter
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Heavy Harrows

I was wanting some opinions on heavy harrows. I can get a new set of Riteways and a new set of Brandt. Both for the same price.. Looking at a set of 50 footers. Any input would be appreciated. Any pros or cons would be nice to know on either set..
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-11-2011, 09:16 PM
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70' Flexi-Coil's here. I don't like the cable set-up to hold those wings in working position. If any one of those cables let go while you're driving like a luantic across the field it's going to be a big twisted mess behind you....unless of course you acutally see it break and can stop in time. We have done many acres with them and they haven't broke yet so maybe that's nothing to worry about. However, there are occasions when I like to lift the harrows up a bit (just to clear some of the straw out of them) and with less pressure on the ground the wings start to catch up to the tractor when going down hills or turning really fast. Other than that we've had them for many years and haven't had any issues with them. I'm not sure....does Flexi-coil still make these harrows?
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-11-2011, 09:21 PM Thread Starter
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I dont think that they make them anymore.. Thats what I have been told..
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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 02:07 AM
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IMO, if you have any kind of chopper on the combine, and cut half decently high, heavy harrows are an over-rated, un-needed tool. I have seen studies that prove the cost to operate vs. the actual net gain is not worth the fuel, time, and capital cost. Chop it well out of the combine, leave a half decent stubble height, and save your money. Just my opinion.

Course it depends on what it is you think they will accomplish, and what you want them to accomplish. To me they are a machine that makes nice stripes in the field in the fall, with nary a net gain.
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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 02:23 AM
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What I find with heavy harrowing, is that if its a nice warm day when u seed, lots of times it was a waste of money. But if its a tuff night or drizzling during the day it was money well spent. It beats making a mess of the field or having to just go home.
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 10:41 AM Thread Starter
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Where we are we grow alot of straw so we can have a major trash problem.. Few guys in our area have them and they think they are the best thing since sliced bread.
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 11:05 AM
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Same here. We grow too much straw. Guys swear by them, but I have yet to see the benefit. I seed into what they may think is unseedable trash, patrly because I am growing better crops anyway, and partly because they have this cosmetic idea of perfection stuck n their head. The odd straw clump, I have yet to notice little croplees areas where the straw was as they would say, too thick.

But to each his own. I like my straw erect, much easier to seed into than torn, knocked down, or leaning stubble. But then I generally cut higher too. That rule of thumb of seeder spacing vs. stubble height, I have trashed for 14 years!! Erect and attached stubble flows, horizontal and loose straw, not as easily. Just my theory.
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 01:01 PM
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They are a good way to keep grandpa busy without being able to do much damage, keeps him out of my hair and everyone is happy except the guy who has to follow him down the road to the feild for 10 miles because he has never in his life looked behind him.

I personally like the bourgault, infinitely adjustable to adjust to most feild conditions. They do have their place help warm up the soil a little bit and redistribute the straw, but aren't absolutely necessary. Probably not worth what they cost.
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-15-2011, 10:02 PM
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im with uthinkyourwet however i sell some straw to my parents so real heavy stubble is baled but we have no use for a heavy harrow just need a fine cut chopper
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-15-2011, 10:35 PM
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I don't use a heavy harrow, but I do use a normal sized harrow. Works real good for leveling out piles and what not but leaves the stubble standing. I cant stand bouncing over big piles of straw lol. I have a bourgault 80 ft and it pulls real easy
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