Electric Tractors ... what's happening with them? - Page 5 - The Combine Forum
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post #41 of 70 (permalink) Old 01-29-2018, 11:55 PM Thread Starter
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I think this may be part of the reason ag manufacturers have been reluctant to take this route. The last thing they want to do is produce something with a longer life span. It is OK in mining and construction because these industries put more hours on in a year than most farm equipment does in 10. They need stuff to last 20 or 30,000 hours because it doesn't actually take long to reach those hours, in farming that would last generations.
Oh heck yeah if equipment that has a shorter life span due to drivetrain or hydraulic wear (hydrostats etc) could go 30,000 before you'd have to worry about service that would really throw a wrench into things I would think.

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post #42 of 70 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 12:04 AM
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Touché

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post #43 of 70 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 12:07 AM
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Also think of the recycling value of the tractor when the lifespan is done, quite a few thousand pounds of lead and copper to recover.
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post #44 of 70 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by kevlar View Post
I think this may be part of the reason ag manufacturers have been reluctant to take this route. The last thing they want to do is produce something with a longer life span. It is OK in mining and construction because these industries put more hours on in a year than most farm equipment does in 10. They need stuff to last 20 or 30,000 hours because it doesn't actually take long to reach those hours, in farming that would last generations.
Electric car manufacturers claim 500,000-1 mil km life span for their vehicles.
Electric car users report that their bigger expense is tires wear every 100-150,000 km. Yes, you heard it right, tires wear !

MTZ 3023 (300 hp Belarus made electric drive tractors) have been produced and tested since 2009. Our testing of the electric drive tractors indicates at least 30,000 hours no maintenance life span for the electric drive.
So this is raising interesting questions about how long a tractor should last, what's its replacement cycle, what will happen to the new and used market if you can own a tractor which could potentially last a life long.
Interesting indeed...
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post #45 of 70 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 08:45 AM
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Lucy, gosh darn, yur so smart.Can you imagine burying this tractor in a slough? You couldn't pay me enough to come near that thing to hook up to it. Having a 500hp vfd in a stable dry control room is one thing, but having one strapped to a tractor dealing with moisture or water, moving, twisting and yet having a man sitting on it!
Forget that!
It'll be perfectly safe... Electric irrigation pivots have been around for over fifty years now and up until twenty years ago everything was in the rain every time those machines run, today many are built with drop tubes so only the motors get wet. It is common to see those drip proof motors completely submerged in water as towers move through sloughs and not have issues, I've even them sit submerged in water over winter and started the next spring and continue running for god knows how long.

I believe electric drives on mobile equipment would be sealed and liquid cooled so it would be even safer.
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Why is there never time and money to do it correctly but there's always plenty to do it again
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post #46 of 70 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 08:53 AM
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Submersible well pumps have been around for awhile and it's never the motor that fails.
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post #47 of 70 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 10:08 AM
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Maybe battery's in chore tractor that cycled daily and near the grid.

Forget it in the large field tractors. Cycle time just does not fit nor would the grid come even close to supporting it.

200 years from now maybe the price of fossil fuels will make batteries feasible.

I'd see on farm natural gas liquifying stations way way way before batteries.
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post #48 of 70 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 10:32 AM Thread Starter
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Maybe battery's in chore tractor that cycled daily and near the grid.

Forget it in the large field tractors. Cycle time just does not fit nor would the grid come even close to supporting it.

200 years from now maybe the price of fossil fuels will make batteries feasible.

I'd see on farm natural gas liquifying stations way way way before batteries.
I wonder if would be economically feasible to build say 130-150hp chore/loader type tractor diesel electric that gets used and abused on a daily on a dairy/livestock operation. As others mentioned not sure about batteries and being fully electric. But if they did work that would be interesting if say they only have to run 6 hrs. a day then plug into charge.

From what I hear parts of Auz. have high solar panel usage. I know a guy that was down there that works in this industry. Says a utility company supplied 30 homes with battery back ups as they already had solar panels to just see how much they'd need off the grid. Out of the 30 homes .....22 used nothing off the grid and were able to run on off the batteries over night. Now of course its all about location (sun light) and draw (wouldn't work here) but I'm sure its making utility companies in parts of the world think about investing a billion in a big power plant that would need 50 years to pay for its self.
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post #49 of 70 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 11:15 AM
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Yes, an on farm bio diesel facility would be more practical and plausible in the future than a 450hp battery driven tractor. That would solve a lot t of concerns with the hand wringing of "peak oil", climate nazi's, green initiatives, oppose big oil, while being more self sufficient.

I wonder why there is not a lot of subsidized government research and programs to develop bio diesel packages that can be rolled out to farmers in a few years as we approach the Armageddon of fossil fuels we are warned of. When fuel gets that expensive it would make sense to turn your own production into a fuel stock.
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post #50 of 70 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 11:28 AM
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I wonder if would be economically feasible to build say 130-150hp chore/loader type tractor diesel electric that gets used and abused on a daily on a dairy/livestock operation.
Our calculations show that in 300-600 hp our diesel-electric drive will be less expensive than present diesel models from other brands.
More powerful models will have larger cost advantage.
That's why we start with a 360 hp. Initial indications are that when priced less than diesels, it's a "no brainer" decision for the farmer, given the benefits of the Electric drive.

However, at 150 hp our diesel-electric drive are about the same price as major's diesel models, which will make it a tougher sale.
The factory is presently testing 150 hp wheel and track model, see info attached.

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File Type: pdf 150_hp_Electric_Drive.pdf (546.2 KB, 31 views)
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