Bourgault 3710 review - Page 49 - The Combine Forum
 125Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #481 of 539 (permalink) Old 03-27-2019, 09:50 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 859
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 162 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cat man View Post
Well here we go replacing the failed bearings in the packer cleaner pivot. This was the first area Bourgault updated to bearings instead of dry bushings. At this time Bourgault installed 2 bearings in this pivot with nothing between them. Over time we found that the bearings either slide to one side or they both slide into the middle of the housing. This allowed the seals to get wiped out easily being so far from the bearings. They filled with dirt and went out quickly.

This current update includes a plastic spacer between the bearings. I am removing all cleaner/packer assemblies and installing this update. Pins are all coming out extremely hard. Bearings are all together either in the middle or off to one side.
So how many hours have you spent fixing your drill. It must be like a helicopter with 30 hours of maintenance for every hour of run time.

SWMan likes this.
wheatking is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #482 of 539 (permalink) Old 03-27-2019, 10:40 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 5,018
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Quoted: 850 Post(s)
The 2015 70’ 3720 that I drive has yet to have any needle bearings replaced in either the packer pivots or any of the parallel linkage. Those bearings are all still fine at 40,000 acres. Catman’s experience will be different because it is an older unit that began life with brass bushings that in the case of that particular drill, wore out and began moving inside the castings.

We have changed a dozen or more disc bearings though, simply because they didn’t understand the volume of grease it takes to actually fill the disc bearing hub. We grease those and the entire drill again at the midpoint of planting with a hydraulic greaser with about a 100’ hose.

(2015 was the first year of standard production using torrington / needle bearings)

8850Champion likes this.

Last edited by Haystack; 03-27-2019 at 10:49 AM.
Haystack is offline  
post #483 of 539 (permalink) Old 03-28-2019, 02:37 PM
Senior Member
 
8850Champion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: nw north dakota
Posts: 560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 198 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haystack View Post
The 2015 70í 3720 that I drive has yet to have any needle bearings replaced in either the packer pivots or any of the parallel linkage. Those bearings are all still fine at 40,000 acres. Catmanís experience will be different because it is an older unit that began life with brass bushings that in the case of that particular drill, wore out and began moving inside the castings.

We have changed a dozen or more disc bearings though, simply because they didnít understand the volume of grease it takes to actually fill the disc bearing hub. We grease those and the entire drill again at the midpoint of planting with a hydraulic greaser with about a 100í hose.

(2015 was the first year of standard production using torrington / needle bearings)
Although I still hate our 3720 (2015 as well) I have to agree with this statement. No needle bearings only probably 20 hub bearings have needed replacing.
8850Champion is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #484 of 539 (permalink) Old 03-29-2019, 11:28 AM
Senior Member
 
wavesofgrain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: South Central Washington State
Posts: 637
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 63 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8850Champion View Post
Although I still hate our 3720 (2015 as well) I have to agree with this statement. No needle bearings only probably 20 hub bearings have needed replacing.
Why do you hate it? Just curious as BG is making drills with on frame tanks for the hills of the PNW and I was considering one of them to replace our Cross Slot in a couple years.

"Never deliberately make an enemy in life, you'll make plenty by accident." Abraham Lincoln
wavesofgrain is offline  
post #485 of 539 (permalink) Old 04-02-2019, 09:24 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
cat man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: North Dakota
Posts: 449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haystack View Post
The 2015 70í 3720 that I drive has yet to have any needle bearings replaced in either the packer pivots or any of the parallel linkage. Those bearings are all still fine at 40,000 acres. Catmanís experience will be different because it is an older unit that began life with brass bushings that in the case of that particular drill, wore out and began moving inside the castings.

We have changed a dozen or more disc bearings though, simply because they didnít understand the volume of grease it takes to actually fill the disc bearing hub. We grease those and the entire drill again at the midpoint of planting with a hydraulic greaser with about a 100í hose.

(2015 was the first year of standard production using torrington / needle bearings)
That's good positive news to hear that you are not having trouble with pivot bearings. Do you know if your drill has the plastic spacer installed between two bearings or three bearings installed in the pivots?

My drill was born with lube free composit bushings not brass. I don't believe they ever made them with brass bushings, please correct me if I'm wrong on this. And my drill was updated to two bearings with no spacer. And the needle bearings themselves moved inside the housing to one side of the pivot allowing the seal on the opposite end to get wiped out and fill with dirt. So this is the third set of wear parts in the packer cleaner pivot. This time a plastic spacer is being installed to keep the bearing on the outside of the housing directly against the seal.
cat man is offline  
post #486 of 539 (permalink) Old 04-02-2019, 09:50 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 5,018
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Quoted: 850 Post(s)
I’m not sure if the bearings have a spacer between them or not inside this 2015 3720, we haven’t had a linkage apart yet in its four crops of use. We used a new 2014 60 foot 3710 for one crop while the 70’ foot HF 3720 was still being developed. By the propaganda at that time I assumed the dry composite bushings used in 2014 were an evolution of the 3710’s era. Perhaps brass bushings were never used in Bourgault’s paralink drills??? Someone else will need to clarify that. I thought the earlier designs used greasable brass bushings???

I’m sure things will straighten up when you get any of your bearings and seals that are moving to stay in the proper position.

We don’t usually have any cobbled field surfaces to plant on, so no doubt that helps with the longevity of the opener linkages also.
.
Haystack is offline  
post #487 of 539 (permalink) Old 04-02-2019, 11:39 PM
Senior Member
 
8850Champion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: nw north dakota
Posts: 560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 198 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by wavesofgrain View Post
Why do you hate it? Just curious as BG is making drills with on frame tanks for the hills of the PNW and I was considering one of them to replace our Cross Slot in a couple years.
My experience is based upon the drill itself and lack of a good dealer. The drill does a good job, but is a pain to work on and operate in my opinion. I was agonizing on how to fix my surging meters, my openers that would drop down on the road even when the safety lock was engaged, and my section control manifold that wouldn't stay in place. The first 2 issues have been "fixed" in the Bourgault world for 3 years, but I only heard about it last May even though I asked the dealer about it repeatedly. On the 3rd issue all I got from the rep was a "well, that shouldn't happen"... no help, no give a ****...

On to the drill. I think the seed opener works fine with the latest scraper update. It places the seed consistently at the bottom of the trench. I had issues with the old scraper, but it works a lot better now. I seed into a lot of tall residue like sunflowers, corn, stripper wheat and flax straw. What happens is that the long straw wears the grease zerks and loosens the hydraulic lines that attach to each openers cylinder which inturn makes a mess and requires the operator (me) to climb up and down the frame quite often. If you seed into residue that can jam or wrap around the opener Bourgault offers a shield that wraps around the front of the disc hub. The shield does its job, but it makes greasing, changing discs, and even adjusting the scraper position more challenging.

On to the MRB's. The Mid rows are attached to the frame and cannot follow the contours of the ground that well. Leveling the Frame is a matter of adjusting air pressure on the front tires on the toolbar. Once you get it dialed in it you can usually adjust all of the MRB's with the same depth shims, but to run 2" deep some MRBS have 2.5 inches of shims and some have .5 inches of shims. If you have any perfectionist or OCD bone in your body it will drive you insane. That first day you use them every year takes a few months off of your life. I have the closing tine instead of a guage/packer wheel. It does work better than I thought it would.

On to the tank. (7950). Most everybody loves the Bourgault cart and I can see why. There are a lot of good things about the cart... I really only have 2 issues. First, I have 8 primary lines for fert and 8 for seed. With my blockage monitor it can show a flow rate and compare tower to tower. Some towers are going to be up to 8-10 percent hot and some are going to be 8-10 percent light. There isn't a way to fine tune the air flow system like there is on some other brands. Does it really matter? I would say probably not a whole lot, but you can occasionally see some streaking if you pay attention. The other issue that I have which may be a tractor issue instead of cart, but the fan RPMs really change as the hydraulic oil warms up. As an example it could be 4200 RPM starting out but 4800 rpm when it warms up. For most people that may not matter, but I try to use as little air as possible so seed or fertilizer doesn't "bounce" out of the trench. If the operator isn't paying attention this is the difference between running smoothly and plugging a few runs.

Because of all my little complaints I find it to be a highly stressful drill to run and it unrealistic to put any john smith in the tractor for a weekend to run this. However, the crops that come up behind this are usually really good. Hopefully that answers your question.
8850Champion is offline  
post #488 of 539 (permalink) Old 04-03-2019, 09:48 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 5,018
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Quoted: 850 Post(s)
The sectional control distributor would slip at its slotted mounting hole on top of the hitch and tilt itself forward on this 7950 cart as well. I just levelled it up and welded the two parts together inside the slotted holes beside those two bolts. You also need to be very cautious not to cut the replacement primary hoses too short in that area, it’s surprising how much slack it takes for turning or crossing drains and old roads.

Personally I don’t like minimal fan speeds. My concern is that the most pronounced sags in the primary hoses on the machine will stratify some seed and fertilizer in the bottom of the sag, this reduces the remaining airflow area inside the hose at that spot which causes a smaller amount of airflow and material to exit into that port back at the distributor, therefore causing the unaffected primaries to flow a greater than average amount of air, along with a greater than average amount of material.

If you are routinely plugging primaries this is likely occurring. If I was concerned about one or two fast flowing primaries I would put a muffler clamp on those two primaries and use it as a an air volume throttle. So far I haven’t seen the need for it.
.

Last edited by Haystack; 04-03-2019 at 09:57 AM.
Haystack is offline  
post #489 of 539 (permalink) Old 04-03-2019, 11:16 AM
Senior Member
 
8850Champion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: nw north dakota
Posts: 560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 198 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haystack View Post
The sectional control distributor would slip at its slotted mounting hole on top of the hitch and tilt itself forward on this 7950 cart as well. I just levelled it up and welded the two parts together inside the slotted holes beside those two bolts. You also need to be very cautious not to cut the replacement primary hoses too short in that area, itís surprising how much slack it takes for turning or crossing drains and old roads.

Personally I donít like minimal fan speeds. My concern is that the most pronounced sags in the primary hoses on the machine will stratify some seed and fertilizer in the bottom of the sag, this reduces the remaining airflow area inside the hose at that spot which causes a smaller amount of airflow and material to exit into that port back at the distributor, therefore causing the unaffected primaries to flow a greater than average amount of air, along with a greater than average amount of material.

If you are routinely plugging primaries this is likely occurring. If I was concerned about one or two fast flowing primaries I would put a muffler clamp on those two primaries and use it as a an air volume throttle. So far I havenít seen the need for it.
.
I also welded mine in place. I hear you on minimal fan speeds. I've never plugged a primary. I just have a couple of seed runs that have a little dip so I can really see what my minimum RPMs are. With my flow rate system on my blockage monitor I compared different fan speeds to see if distribution was any different and couldn't see any difference unless I was at the minimum RPMS on the edge of plugging. Fan speed with the new scrapers isn't nearly as critical for performance as with the old ones.
8850Champion is offline  
post #490 of 539 (permalink) Old 04-10-2019, 11:13 AM
Senior Member
 
kauppfarms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: New Dayton, AB
Posts: 883
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 348 Post(s)
Anybody else lose cleaner/gauge wheels almost every single day? Terrible drill these things


Any inquiries-
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
kauppfarms is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Combine Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome