Case ih 8500 air hoe questions. - The Combine Forum
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-28-2011, 10:57 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
doorknob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Hillsboro Oregon
Posts: 3,259
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Quoted: 281 Post(s)
Case ih 8500 air hoe questions.

Hi all. I have a couple questions about the 8500.

Soil penetration, how much "down pressure" so to speak would this unit have? I know down pressure is a term mostly for the disk drills, but that is all I am familiar with.

It appears that high residue is not an issue, but how about root bound soils that are bound with perennial grass roots? Can these openers stay in the ground with that much drag against them?

What other points would you make to a first time operator of such a drill?

Thanks.

doorknob is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-29-2011, 05:16 PM
Senior Member
 
GrampaMark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Hogeland, MT
Posts: 209
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by doorknob View Post
Hi all. I have a couple questions about the 8500.

Soil penetration, how much "down pressure" so to speak would this unit have? I know down pressure is a term mostly for the disk drills, but that is all I am familiar with.

It appears that high residue is not an issue, but how about root bound soils that are bound with perennial grass roots? Can these openers stay in the ground with that much drag against them?

What other points would you make to a first time operator of such a drill?

Thanks.
I had an 8500 for 8 or 9 years. It's a good drill for conventional- or minimum-till. In no-till the openers can ride up out of the ground in tough or dry conditions.

There isn't really any adjustment for down pressure. You can move the boots up or down and change the angle of the point. The trip spring is the limiting factor and that really isn't adjustable. Once the spring tension is overcome the opener is going to run shallower.

I have a neighbor who still uses an 8500 for seeding wheat in chemfallow no-till. He uses a narrow carbide point and gets decent results in reasonably mellow soil. Hard and/or dry soil will cause his drill to produce a somewhat uneven stand.

I used my 8500 for small grains in a minimum-till situation and had very good results. (When I bought a Flexi 5000 a few years ago I switched to straight no-till.) I had good luck with the drill. Some parts are getting hard to find. Axles for the cart wheels, the drive sprocket which mounts on the right-side cart hub and the bushings for the end of the feed shaft where the rate adjuster is are items that seem to be in short supply.

I found that the 8500 was flexible enough to follow the ground well and the seeding rate was fairly accurate. The parts issue is common to most pieces of equipment that have been out of production for quite a few years. The all run monitor is a nice feature, but you will probably find that the majority of the alerts are false alarms resulting from a worn sensor or broken wire. Not having a hopper-bottom tank makes the drill something of a pain to clean out between crops or at the end of the planting season. That's not a job for an old guy like me, but, my son belongs to FFA (father farms alone ). I was happy to get a drill that was easier to clean out.

Mark

GrampaMark is offline  
post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-01-2011, 12:15 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Sask.
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hey grandpa mark, did you or could you run fertilizer through the seed side as well and use the tank for deep banding. I would like to deep band with it but will be filling constantly if you can only use the fertilizer side of the tank? Would it ruin the seed feed cups( i forget what its called) if you run fert through it i guess is my question or could it be done that way?
duxnbux is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-01-2011, 11:08 PM
Senior Member
 
GrampaMark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Hogeland, MT
Posts: 209
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by duxnbux View Post
Hey grandpa mark, did you or could you run fertilizer through the seed side as well and use the tank for deep banding. I would like to deep band with it but will be filling constantly if you can only use the fertilizer side of the tank? Would it ruin the seed feed cups( i forget what its called) if you run fert through it i guess is my question or could it be done that way?
We never used ours for all fertilizer but I know some folks who did.

We never put any fertilizer through the 8500; we took the dividers out that separated the front and back sections of the tank and used the drill for all seed. We applied liquid fertilizer separately ahead of the drill.

I don't think running fertilizer through the seed cups would be as much of a problem as trying to deep band with the drill. In a spring like this year you could put fertilizer down to China. In dry conditions it would be hard to keep the openers in the ground.

Mark
GrampaMark is offline  
post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-01-2011, 11:13 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Crookston, MN
Posts: 839
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
You can change the divider and the fertilizer sprocket to "band" fertilizer only. With seed the small sprocket will only put down about 85 lbs of fertilizer.
mvpfarms is offline  
post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-02-2011, 12:02 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Sask.
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvpfarms View Post
You can change the divider and the fertilizer sprocket to "band" fertilizer only. With seed the small sprocket will only put down about 85 lbs of fertilizer.
thanks for the help, I saw on the little video on youtube that with a quick adjustment you could use the unit to deep band. I just bought the thing and the owner could not find the manual at the time. He has now so I'm going to pick it up soon. I would like to put down about 165lbs deep banding. is this possible? I read on here before the guys were saying through the fert cups you could max out at about 85 lbs. Any help would be appreciated on how to set it up to do more. Thanks trent
duxnbux is offline  
post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-02-2011, 12:13 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Crookston, MN
Posts: 839
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Once you get the manual it will tell you how to do all of this.
mvpfarms is offline  
post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-02-2011, 12:45 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Sask.
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
perfect, thanks guys
duxnbux is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Combine Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Case IH 8500 Air Drill Observations Christian A. Herrnboeck Planting & Tillage 47 10-04-2019 01:00 PM
IH 8500 air hoe for fert morb1lee Planting & Tillage 3 04-09-2015 09:34 PM
Case IH 8500 packer tires 5488 Planting & Tillage 2 07-25-2014 11:00 AM
case 8500 monitors philonthefarm Planting & Tillage 9 11-30-2010 10:19 PM
case 8500 air drills philonthefarm Planting & Tillage 0 04-16-2010 11:35 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome