Residue Management- Schulte Soilstar - Page 2 - The Combine Forum
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post #11 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-30-2019, 12:45 AM
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Has anybody had a chance to demo the Schulte units?

The DHX600 interests me as a replacement for both our heavy harrows, as well as possibly our ProTill as we move to less true tillage. And would probably also get rid of our old deeptiller that's strictly reserved for drying out potholes.

We rented a gates coulter harrow without the rolling baskets, and I liked the job it did, but this just looks better.

I'd like to demo one, but no real Schulte dealers in our area.
My concern with any unit like this that stirs up damp soil before harrows is that straw does not harrow very well/even if it is not dry. Also being heavy tines it will do a generally poor job at straw management. Looks very heavy too.

Honestly have you tried a Super-7 harrow? There is a reason that Bourgault/Summers and possibly others now are copying that design, it is amazing at straw management. If you have bad ruts no coulter unit or harrow will smooth it out properly, better keep the deep tiller. If it's wet the Super-7 will do a pretty good job on ruts though.

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post #12 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-30-2019, 09:29 AM
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I see it having a fit in the spring for drying. Good pressure on the counters, light pressure on the harrows. That's when we used the Gates and it did an excellent job on wheat stubble, after 9 inches of rain in 12 days. But I see your points about ruts and damp straw.

I think a guy could have every set of harrows and piece of tillage equipment sitting in the yard, so you had one that worked in every condition, and when the time came, you still wouldn't know which to use

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post #13 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-30-2019, 11:46 AM
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Conditions here are probably pretty different from you. However some no till guys in heavy wheat (100+ bu/ac) have settled on post harvest mowing, chiseling, and then a spring harrowing before 1 pass seeding. I wouldn't call it no till. But they like you want to open up and dry out the soil for springtime. I'm sure you've heard that residue management starts with a combine, I know you can only do so much with it as well. Kind of surprised the pro till didn't work for ya, the guys that have tried it around here talked pretty highly of it but no one owns one. I'm still figuring out my system but right now I get away with just heavy harrowing but like I said conditions are drier here. In the future I plan on fall chiseling if residue and weed control is necessary. Curious what kind of drill you use?

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post #14 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-30-2019, 04:16 PM
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I do actually love our Protill, and it works excellent for residue management, but can turn things quite black very quickly. This is fine if the bias stays wet, but we've been caught a few times where its sopping wet in the fall, then in the spring it's too dry.

And it's really not a great spring tool in our operation. Even with the rubber packer, it leaves things a little too loose if its dry, and packs it to concrete if its wet and sees some sun. If done in the fall, these are non- issues.

We replace hammers yearly, and always sharpen or replace stationary knives. PowerCast tail board does an excellent job of spreading residue full width. We generally like to harrow in the fall when it's hot and dry if we can, and that's usually enough. But if we don't get the weather in the fall, spring we can fall flat.

We have an Amity (back to Concord) PSD61. Its proven itself an extraordinary no till drill, even though it itself isn't no till.

Where I feel like we need an implement to fit better is in the spring for warming and drying, if necessary. It's a big heavy drill that doesn't like mud, which we can often have a lot of.

My dad farmed a lot of dry years, we've both farmed in a lot of wet as well. The key here, is trying to be flexible and adaptable
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post #15 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-30-2019, 06:24 PM
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I see it having a fit in the spring for drying. Good pressure on the counters, light pressure on the harrows. That's when we used the Gates and it did an excellent job on wheat stubble, after 9 inches of rain in 12 days. But I see your points about ruts and damp straw.

I think a guy could have every set of harrows and piece of tillage equipment sitting in the yard, so you had one that worked in every condition, and when the time came, you still wouldn't know which to use
If I had every piece of tillage equipment that I could use in every condition likely would not want to look at the fuel bill let alone the cost of the iron. As mentioned above, being adaptable without breaking the bank is pretty important. For now that means renting a protill if Fall conditions/fertilizer prices warrant it. I do think that Schulte is interesting as could almost see it as being useful in most any Spring condition we have. Getting that soil warmed up around here is a real benefit most years and even if it is dry using the harrow without the coulter would be ok. If it built as tough as Schulte mower we have it may be good, but that price is still hard to justify. I am very sure that I will not be first person to buy one around here; it would be nice to rent though. With conditions we have here now will be digging out old cultivator with spikes and getting it tuned up for at least a few aces.
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post #16 of 18 (permalink) Old 07-01-2019, 03:35 PM
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And even if you had them all, sometimes the answer would still be none
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post #17 of 18 (permalink) Old 07-01-2019, 08:42 PM
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A couple things about that unit would concern me on our operation.
First off I believe the high speed discs, especially with concave discs without notches, can become major compaction culprits.
The rows of discs look to be too close to me. At high speeds, the first row of a concave disc can really throw dirt and residue straight back on to the top of the second row discs, which can cause plugging. At least this was the case with the Joker we used to have. I always thought the Joker would plug less if the distance between disc rows was greater. This was a problem magnified in corn, which may not be a concern to many of you.
In wet conditions there were times that I thought harrows on the Joker would have been much better. However, if possible those tools should probably be avoided in wet conditions due to compaction.
So if conditions are right... I think having packers on these discs would be desirable. When you flop that much dirt around, it's probably going to dry out if you don't press it back down immediately with some press.

The most versatile tillage unit on our farm is our Summers Super Coulter. If stones aren't a problem, I think it would have a great fit on most farms. However, you have a similar machine with your Gates.
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post #18 of 18 (permalink) Old 07-02-2019, 04:36 PM
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I think you're talking about the other SoilStar machine. The Protill/Joker/speed tiller etc competitor. I don't like the design of it. I agree with your points on it

If I was back in that market, I'd look seriously at a Versatile Fury.

It's the one with the two rows of coulters and the heavy harrow sections that I'm more interested in
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