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-   -   peas, no inoculant (https://www.thecombineforum.com/forums/19-planting-tillage/332201-peas-no-inoculant.html)

NWsask 05-11-2019 01:36 PM

It would be nice if there had been peas there before but i still think just leave it and see what happens. Its not like you can re inoculate the peas in the ground and double seeding isn't a great option.

DDF 05-11-2019 02:38 PM

What spacing are your peas?
My first thought was to try and apply liquid innoculant with as little ground disturbance as possible, as a desperation move to get some of those bugs in the soil. Disc side dresser? A drill with just MRB's down? Planter with a liquid kit? I am not a pea grower, but if nodulation is not accomplished, could N be top dressed post emerge to compensate?

Marusko 05-11-2019 03:56 PM

Depends on your soil and how much natural rhizobia are present and if they're compatible with peas. Had a screw up last year on fabas where none at all went down and it yielded great still. This was on land that has never seen pulses. It might be ok. 2-4 weeks after emergence, check nodules. Cut them open. If they're pinkish-red inside, they are working. If not, consider top dressing but do the numbers, it's pricey for the amount you need and for what yellow peas are worth right now. DDF's suggestions are interesting but it's supposed to go right in the seed row, could be tough to get it placed right without disturbing the seed.

wheatking 05-11-2019 11:27 PM

I had a bad batch of innoculant once, difference was 60bpa vs 20.

schraefel 05-12-2019 09:04 AM

I certainly wouldn't worry about it. Even bridged, you would have got some on you would think. I do think they recommend a higher rate than is required to accommodate rate screw-ups, as with liquid, peat or granular it never seems to be a perfect rate. It will be interesting to watch over the season. If it's that bad you could top dress with some N but I bet it won't be that bad. Here's hoping!

Millie 05-12-2019 09:33 AM

It happens and there is nothing you can do so don't worry about it. But you will see it, it will prove to you how good ot works.

brazil08 05-12-2019 09:45 AM

The waiting and the apprehension that go along with experiments like this is the hardest part, but think you can be assured that everybody been there, done that. It would be good to hear results of experiments where putting on granular inoculant after seeding, but my opinion is that as much as you hate wasting product(if you find anybody that takes back inoculant already tank and/or pays damages would love to hear), you likely saving fuel and keeping your pea seed bed uncompromised by just tossing it rather than applying after the fact. As has been mentioned you have other options after crop comes up if you feel like spending more money - experiments that save money this yr may be the best.

If it makes you feel better I have a few pretty much planned experiments this yr - no inoculant, high residual N(Ie - over 100lbs/a), poorly applied peat Inoculant - low residual N, pretty healthy dose of fertilizer, and even no inoculant, healthy dose of fert after seeding(ok - this was bit of unplanned thing). I am pretty sure that the biggest crop will be on the no inoculant, very high N land, however, the peas may stay greener, longer than is healthy in this country. FWIW - I do not grow peas for its N fixing abilities and have found in past that crop following peas is always better regardless of inoculant. I am sure different land responds to Inoculant differently like so many other things in farming.

Slip clutch 05-12-2019 09:59 AM

6 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by brazil08 (Post 3333289)
The waiting and the apprehension that go along with experiments like this is the hardest part, but think you can be assured that everybody been there, done that. It would be good to hear results of experiments where putting on granular inoculant after seeding, but my opinion is that as much as you hate wasting product(if you find anybody that takes back inoculant already tank and/or pays damages would love to hear), you likely
saving fuel and keeping your pea seed bed uncompromised by just tossing it rather than applying after the fact. As has been mentioned you have other options after crop comes up if you feel like spending more money - experiments that save money this yr may be the best.

If it makes you feel better I have a few pretty much planned experiments this yr - no inoculant, high residual N(Ie - over 100lbs/a), poorly applied peat Inoculant - low residual N, pretty healthy dose of fertilizer, and even no inoculant, healthy dose of fert after seeding(ok - this was bit of unplanned thing). I am pretty sure that the biggest crop will be on the no inoculant, very high N land, however, the peas may stay greener, longer than is healthy in this country. FWIW - I do not grow peas for its N fixing abilities and have found in past that crop following peas is always better regardless of inoculant. I am sure different land responds to Inoculant differently like so many other things in farming.

Keep an eye on all your f ups. Like I have every year and I have lots like you mention lol. and tell us your experiences.

marshall 05-12-2019 10:04 AM

I am seeding soyabeans on land that had them last year ( ran only 17 bushels due to drought ) with just the dealer applied liquid on the seed but am wondering if I should put some phos down the opener as well because I won't be using the front tank for anything ? I know that it won't help the beans but for next year .

kenmb 05-12-2019 10:18 AM

Different land responds to innoculant differently is one thing that research seems to agree on. I was looking for info on the subject this season and research into rhizobia carry over from previous years and, strangely, I can't find any research data. I understand this example is for ground that hadn't seen peas before. But the one common point made on the subject is that some land types are expected to see rhizobia carry over for many years. I beleive it was soil with less than Ph 7.0 and high temperatures were detrimental to long term survivability. It would be nice to see hard numbers on that, but if we take this as truth then one can't simply accept blanket statements on forum posts saying you have to innoculant every time. I have run a few tanks of seed with no innoculant to see what would happen and couldn't see any difference but that is hardly research. My soil Ph is +7.5. My yield monitor may not be accurate enough, or variability of my ground may dictate I had good carry over already in those areas. I don't know. Proper research would be beneficial so if someone comes across some papers it would be good to post.


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