Deere 1895 in heavy soil - The Combine Forum
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-26-2019, 02:20 PM Thread Starter
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Deere 1895 in heavy soil

I am thinking of going to a John Deere 1895 to make seeding a one pass system. I farm very heavy silt clay in an old lake bottom. It is super sticky.

I plan on seeding right into soybean stubble. I have looked at some 1895 rigs and it looks like the gauge wheel on the rear rank runs right over the furrow made by the fertilizer rank. My concern is the gauge wheel on the seeding rank building up with wet soil.

Does anybody have any real world experience with this unit in these conditions?

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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-26-2019, 04:37 PM
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Depends on the clay but I know from experience it sticks to the discs and u have to keep the guage wheel as close to the disc as possible or it will build up on the disc. Probably should of raised the midrow row banders to be shallower and wouldn't of built up.

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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-26-2019, 07:58 PM
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Has jd put an angle on their gauge wheel to disk or are they still straight up and down. That little angle is a huge deal when it comes to disk drills and mud.
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-26-2019, 09:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Notinteresting View Post
I am thinking of going to a John Deere 1895 to make seeding a one pass system. I farm very heavy silt clay in an old lake bottom. It is super sticky.

I plan on seeding right into soybean stubble. I have looked at some 1895 rigs and it looks like the gauge wheel on the rear rank runs right over the furrow made by the fertilizer rank. My concern is the gauge wheel on the seeding rank building up with wet soil.

Does anybody have any real world experience with this unit in these conditions?
Not interesting, I have run a 1895 for several years now and wished I had one even sooner. I rebuilt the drill and the 1910 tank. when I got it, I changed the specs because it was built for southern sask, not the heavy clay from the red river valley. If you will run it in clay like I do you have to take off the solid gauge wheels and put the spoke wheels on and in real wet conditions take the small scrapers off the gauge wheel assemble. Also I put a couple more washers on each gauge wheel to bring it away from the disc. Very important make sure all the cams on the depth control slide up and down. A lot of mine seized and I rebuilt all of them with the new style to make greasing easier. Mine is set up with nh3 on front row and back two rows are seed. All 3 row are equally spaced with no over lap. Be prepared for annual maintenance but as long as you look after the equipment it will be a game changer. I don't miss my hoe drill one bit! You will also have to play around with the down pressure to see what works the best. Nice thing with clay your discs will last a lot longer. Also check the main pivot arms because that is what determines your seed slot. Also check the bushings in the closing wheel. In heavy clay you need a tight closing arm assemble so the closing wheel will cover the seed row. If it is loose it will bounce from side to side and leave the seed slot uncovered. Again lots of moving parts but a very good seeding tool bar . An old farmer once told me , Seed too wet and you will regret. Park it if its too wet.
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-03-2019, 12:45 AM
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Oat king said it very well but I’m in red river clay and the smooth closing wheel is ok in dryer soils but in stiff clay it will leave a clay core above the seed whe closing the slot. There are various options to avoid this but by far the best is the Needham closing wheel conversion for leaving crumbled soil in the seed row.
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-25-2019, 09:51 PM
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Did anyone out there buy the case DS disc dill and compare it to the deer 1895. Would like to know the differences between the two when the crop is growing. When using the deer 1895 do you put all the phos in the same pipe as the seed or do you split the difference or ????
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-25-2019, 10:52 PM
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Did anyone out there buy the case DS disc dill and compare it to the deer 1895. Would like to know the differences between the two when the crop is growing. When using the deer 1895 do you put all the phos in the same pipe as the seed or do you split the difference or ????
Yes....all the phos goes into the seed pipe

Let's face it......
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-28-2019, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by shmiffy View Post
Has jd put an angle on their gauge wheel to disk or are they still straight up and down. That little angle is a huge deal when it comes to disk drills and mud.
JD has never had the blade truly vertical -- it has always been tilted slightly towards the gauge-wheel side. Unlike the Flexi-coil FSO and Case PD-500, which are truly vertical. Truly vertical is a better design, although the PD-500's lack of an in-furrow firming wheel (seed-lock wheel) is a major downfall.

The JD drills can go in mud fairly well if you put on the open-rim gauge wheels (and I want them shimmed up tight against the blade). Seed-lock wheels may need to be upgraded to aftermarket also, as the Deere firming wheels don't exactly like mud either.

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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-29-2019, 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by matt hagny View Post
JD has never had the blade truly vertical -- it has always been tilted slightly towards the gauge-wheel side. Unlike the Flexi-coil FSO and Case PD-500, which are truly vertical. Truly vertical is a better design, although the PD-500's lack of an in-furrow firming wheel (seed-lock wheel) is a major downfall.

The JD drills can go in mud fairly well if you put on the open-rim gauge wheels (and I want them shimmed up tight against the blade). Seed-lock wheels may need to be upgraded to aftermarket also, as the Deere firming wheels don't exactly like mud either.
I was asking about the gauge wheel to disk. If the gauge wheel is touching the disk at the bottom and a 1/16 to 1/8” gap at the top. Works way better in mud.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-30-2019, 09:11 AM
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I was asking about the gauge wheel to disk. If the gauge wheel is touching the disk at the bottom and a 1/16 to 1/8” gap at the top. Works way better in mud.
You can get beveled washers easily from bolt places. I think they are used for I beam construction.

I used them on Barton openers to take the scrub angle out of the packers when it is dry.

They would rely on the bolt bending to get the angle however.


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