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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-30-2016, 03:44 PM Thread Starter
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AIM Command

Forgive me if this is a dumb question but I am trying to learn something before purchasing a Case 4420 sprayer with AIM. Some have multiple nozzle bodies but some 4420s just have a single nozzle body...I am looking to spray likely 4 gal for burn off and 10 gal for Liberty and 10 gal for Tilt etc in crop. Is there a decent single nozzle that will do all of that or should I only look at sprayers with multiple nozzles? I suppose another option with the single nozzle body is to switch nozzles with each product but that seems painful.

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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-30-2016, 04:15 PM
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I run 2 sets of nozzles on single nozzle bodies. 100 ft. boom only takes about 5 min to change for one guy. Doesn't really take much longer to swap the nozzle as opposed to turning the nozzle body. Wilger has an awesome app to help you decide on nozzles that factors in speed, GPA, droplet size, etc. I run combo-jet, red MR-110-4 for 4-6 GPA, and light blue ER-110-10 for 9-11 GPA.

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I have AIM command on a 4410 sprayer, its great wen it works. with aim all you need is 2 nozzles one for fertilizer the other for herbicide, pesticide, and fungicide. Remember you can make a big tip smaller, but you can't make a small tip bigger.
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-30-2016, 04:23 PM
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Also with AIM it was recommended to me to not run a screen for each nozzle. I just make sure my boom filters stay clean and I have had minimal problems. Except for achieve and a fungicide called Rovalflo. That white stuff will accumulate in filter housings and nozzle bodies, but it didn't seem to effect the spray pattern or efficacy of the chemicals
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-30-2016, 06:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Goodtime View Post
Forgive me if this is a dumb question but I am trying to learn something before purchasing a Case 4420 sprayer with AIM. Some have multiple nozzle bodies but some 4420s just have a single nozzle body...I am looking to spray likely 4 gal for burn off and 10 gal for Liberty and 10 gal for Tilt etc in crop. Is there a decent single nozzle that will do all of that or should I only look at sprayers with multiple nozzles? I suppose another option with the single nozzle body is to switch nozzles with each product but that seems painful.
Hey Goodtime,

Just to give you a rough outline of the bodies you are looking at. They are likely made by Wilger. They are actually expandable to just add a 5-way turret onto them.

Given what you are looking for application (4 GAL Burnoff/10 Gal for Liberty/Tilt), you are likely going to be shooting yourself in the foot a little bit if you were trying to do both with one tip.

For coverage/efficacy of the chem, most use a fairly different size of droplet size. A lot of it has to do with drift as well as how much of the leaf/head/weeds that need to be touched.

4 GAL BURNOFF
In short, you'd be looking for a 4 Gal nozzle that will reduce your drift to a point where you are comfortable with, but also so you aren't going to be losing your coverage by reducing drift.

If you are new to AIM, one of the easiest things to use is the P1/P2 preset sets. These will change how you spray a fair bit, as you'd be picking your pressure based on whether you are in a more drift sensitive area or in the middle of the field and want the best coverage possible (or ideal conditions).

I.e. For your headlands or other drift sensitive areas, you would have your P1 set to a lower pressure, so your drift is reduced (but so is your coverage). With AIM, you wouldn't necessarily have to slow down to reduce the drift, so a little more productivity there.

For your non-drift sensitive areas, or if conditions are ideal, you might be using P2 at a higher pressure, which would essentially increase your coverage (by getting more, smaller droplets).

If you wanted a glimpse into what this might look like, there is an app called Tip Wizard (free on Android/Iphone) that you plug your application rate/speed/spacing/etc into the app in the PWM application (PWM = AIM Command)

It would show you your speed range(s) for your application with each tip that would work, it would show the respective duty cycle at your speed, the % driftable fines, the VMD (just think average droplet size), as well as your % of small/useful droplets (Anything over 600microns is usually too big to do much good).

Tons of confusing things in the last two paragraphs, but the app has little notes that explain each of them a little bit too. (Or ask me if you have any questions)

For Burnoff, depending what you use, a typically application of Roundup/Glyphosate would target a droplet size of 350microns in IDEAL conditions, but since most guys don't get ideal conditions, I usually tell them to scale it up depending on what kind of winds/applications/drift sensitivity you have to deal with. (i.e. usually guys trying to hit the 400 micron-ish range are very happy with coverage and drift reduction)

10 GAL (Liberty)
Since liberty applies a lot differently than glyphosate, both in spray quality (very 'soapy in the wind') as well as function (contact herb versus systemic herb), it demands a different kind of application to be get the best efficacy.

Use what I said above, as well as the label 'ideal' VMD of 250 (which is pretty darn fine and drifty) with added droplet size to accomodate for the nasty conditions and spray quality. Most guys I talk to settle around the 325 VMD for their Liberty. The guys who might be more drift sensitive for Liberty might even go a little bigger for drift reduction, but they might be adding a little bit of water volume to make up for the coverage.

Tons to read, I know, but AIM has a lot that it that it can do, but you need to understand a little bit more of how to spray like a pro. (Haha, that sounds cheesy, but its pretty true)

If you did need a hand or wanted more info if you were looking into it seriously, send me a PM or I can even give you a call.

(Just for transparency, I do a lot of the sprayer clinics for Wilger across Canada and help guys work through picking tips and all that jazz)

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Originally Posted by jrsharpe View Post
Also with AIM it was recommended to me to not run a screen for each nozzle. I just make sure my boom filters stay clean and I have had minimal problems. Except for achieve and a fungicide called Rovalflo. That white stuff will accumulate in filter housings and nozzle bodies, but it didn't seem to effect the spray pattern or efficacy of the chemicals
Good advice for any sprayer with or without AIM.
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-30-2016, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by farmall007 View Post
I have AIM command on a 4410 sprayer, its great wen it works. with aim all you need is 2 nozzles one for fertilizer the other for herbicide, pesticide, and fungicide. Remember you can make a big tip smaller, but you can't make a small tip bigger.
+1
Just a rough idea for those non-AIM users. Each second nozzle pulses every tenth of a second. If you are using a tip that would be applying 10GPA at your speed/pressure, AIM can reduce its duty cycle to keep the pressure constant, but only apply 5 GPA. This would effectively be a 50% duty cycle.

For a small tip trying to make it bigger, you'd have to slow down.
For a big(within reason) tip, it can be made smaller. Keep your duty cycle ideally between 40-80% when you are picking your tips/rates. If there was a magic number to try strive for, it'd be something like a 70% duty cycle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrsharpe View Post
Also with AIM it was recommended to me to not run a screen for each nozzle. I just make sure my boom filters stay clean and I have had minimal problems. Except for achieve and a fungicide called Rovalflo. That white stuff will accumulate in filter housings and nozzle bodies, but it didn't seem to effect the spray pattern or efficacy of the chemicals
Initially AIM solenoids were kind of 'super protected' by strainers that were inbetween the nozzle body inlet and the solenoid. One issue was that not many operators knew these strainers existed, so they'd be confused when their nozzle strainers and inline strainers were cleaned but there were still flow issues (these were removed in 2013 4430s I think). Over time they announced that if you are using best practices when filling your sprayer (straining before you get it into the transport, then straining again going into the sprayer, then straining in-line) you should be okay to not use strainers.

One thing to watch for with the AIM solenoids is that inside the solenoid, junk can build up on the little poppet (the little spring loaded cylinder inside) and can effect the spray, but usually you'd notice the nozzle leaking a little bit first. (as the solenoids would almost be stuck open)


Just wanted to throw a few things out there.

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Last edited by WilgerIndustries; 03-30-2016 at 06:40 PM.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-30-2016, 09:04 PM
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Originally Posted by farmall007 View Post
I have AIM command on a 4410 sprayer, its great wen it works. with aim all you need is 2 nozzles one for fertilizer the other for herbicide, pesticide, and fungicide. Remember you can make a big tip smaller, but you can't make a small tip bigger.
I agree its great when it works! I have changed about 20 solenoids in the last 3 years. What a messy job when you have chemical in the boom!

On a recommend, I started with no nozzle filters. I blew out 1 or 2 tanks and decided that not filtering is a bad idea. With pulse spraying, you have a harder time watching your patterns to see if your spray pattern has "whiskers" in it. I run a main boom filter and a filter on every nozzle. I have never been sorry and I have never had to clean any of the single filters either. They get rid of the final bit of microscopic dirt that seems to affect your pattern. I do run Wilger nozzles and their filters.

For me, it certainly has never been an annoyance factor with the additional filtering. It just gives me peace of mind that I am getting the best pattern I can out of my nozzles.

Wilger versus Teejet. I think Wilger is likely the best when it runs behind the boom if it is a rear mounted spray boom. I love their charts and easy to size. I dislike Wilger on my front mount boom as it is located on the back side of the boom pipe. I have broke lots off and again I don't like playing with nozzles that are full of chemical. Because they are mounted on the rear side of the fluid pipe and therefore located higher up on the boom, I have very messy booms that seem to really get "blitzed" with chemical as a result.

My original sprayer had Teejet and I converted to Wilger, Sharpshooter (AIM) at the same time. Teejets are located under the boom and I had never knocked any off and my booms stayed 100% cleaner of chemicals. Not perfect but way cleaner. Forgot to mention, the reason for breakage - I have a monoboom Miller type sprayer. If you ever try to circle poles or obstructions and the boom momentarily swings back, you will break the plastic fitting right off at the stainless steel boom hole. If it doesn't break it, it shears the plastic off and it leaks right there. Very messy to change when chemical is running out of the boom. I hate chemicals!

Again, this is my opinion. There are pros and cons to all systems. I also found Teejet were easier to watch spray pattern as it was below boom level. With Wilger top end seems to be masked more by the boom itself and or combination of pulsing which doesn't let you see a continuous pattern coming out of your nozzles in the light!

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Last edited by RunninREDharD; 03-30-2016 at 09:10 PM. Reason: added the last 3 words to clarify
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-31-2016, 11:10 AM
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I agree its great when it works! I have changed about 20 solenoids in the last 3 years. What a messy job when you have chemical in the boom!

On a recommend, I started with no nozzle filters. I blew out 1 or 2 tanks and decided that not filtering is a bad idea. With pulse spraying, you have a harder time watching your patterns to see if your spray pattern has "whiskers" in it. I run a main boom filter and a filter on every nozzle. I have never been sorry and I have never had to clean any of the single filters either. They get rid of the final bit of microscopic dirt that seems to affect your pattern. I do run Wilger nozzles and their filters.

For me, it certainly has never been an annoyance factor with the additional filtering. It just gives me peace of mind that I am getting the best pattern I can out of my nozzles.

Wilger versus Teejet. I think Wilger is likely the best when it runs behind the boom if it is a rear mounted spray boom. I love their charts and easy to size. I dislike Wilger on my front mount boom as it is located on the back side of the boom pipe. I have broke lots off and again I don't like playing with nozzles that are full of chemical. Because they are mounted on the rear side of the fluid pipe and therefore located higher up on the boom, I have very messy booms that seem to really get "blitzed" with chemical as a result.

My original sprayer had Teejet and I converted to Wilger, Sharpshooter (AIM) at the same time. Teejets are located under the boom and I had never knocked any off and my booms stayed 100% cleaner of chemicals. Not perfect but way cleaner. Forgot to mention, the reason for breakage - I have a monoboom Miller type sprayer. If you ever try to circle poles or obstructions and the boom momentarily swings back, you will break the plastic fitting right off at the stainless steel boom hole. If it doesn't break it, it shears the plastic off and it leaks right there. Very messy to change when chemical is running out of the boom. I hate chemicals!

Again, this is my opinion. There are pros and cons to all systems. I also found Teejet were easier to watch spray pattern as it was below boom level. With Wilger top end seems to be masked more by the boom itself and or combination of pulsing which doesn't let you see a continuous pattern coming out of your nozzles in the light!
I don't understand the highlighted sentence. You say they filter "microscopic dirt" but you have never had to clean them. If they are filtering anything at all, why would they not need to be cleaned??. Also, this "microscopic dirt" should be small enough to go right through the nozzle without disrupting flow or constricting the orifice in any way and if so, how does filtering it out help?. Could you please clarify what you mean. Thanks
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