Class 1 licensing in Canada - Page 6 - The Combine Forum
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post #51 of 77 (permalink) Old 02-09-2019, 11:20 AM
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About 10 years ago do you know who had the highest failure rate among commercial vehicles? City of Calgary city buses. I find it interesting that my insurance is so cheap on grain trucks. That tells me they are in very few accidents relative to their time on the road. You can talk all you want about farm trucks being unsafe but it doesn't change the fact that my insurance company has never once requested that I inspect my trucks. If the government gets to keep demanding an unending set of rules and regulations from me I think I should get to demand a guaranteed rate of return on my crops. As a farmer I can't be the one carrying the burden because of some stupid mistake made on a rural highway. My farm is getting to the point that it can't do more with less anymore.

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post #52 of 77 (permalink) Old 02-09-2019, 12:31 PM
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Alberta farm plated trucks dont need a CVIP. But if pulled over by the DOT they are held to the same standard as a commercial yearly CVIPed vehicle, this was straight from a DOT officer that pulled me over. Was just coming back from getting a CVIP on a tandem. I do my trucks every 2yrs just to keep up on things. Dont put enough miles on to notice if something is wearing improper.

Almost think instead of going to the extreme for licensing, maybe a greater DOT presence on major and secondary highways. Thought I read somewhere the Humbolt semi had 70 vehicle violations before the crash. If he had been pulled over it would have been and out of service ticket and fines.

https://globalnews.ca/news/4204667/e...ction-tickets/

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post #53 of 77 (permalink) Old 02-09-2019, 01:24 PM
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More mermaids isn’t the answer. As far as I know the truck in the accident was in service condition. A brand new truck off the lot would have done the exact same thing.
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post #54 of 77 (permalink) Old 02-09-2019, 01:30 PM
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The whole issue points out the lack of driver experience, something which farmers have a lot of. I can't speak from knowledge, but it stands without reason that if you hire an immigrant who drove a bicycle (a mo-ped) in his own country, you may just have a problem with giving him a semi license after 6 months in the country without a regular license. It would be like me going to Australia, having a Class 1 and starting a new job driving on the other side of the road. That is a danger zone.

By hearsay, one driver mentioned that these guys are trained by their own in their own schools. You pile 5 guys in the sleeper and passenger seat and by observation they are granted a Class 1. The guy that mentioned this has driven most of his working life in semis. He has a lot of driver experience and also mentioned that he was involved in an accident where the other driver of a light vehicle clearly committed suicide by driving into his path. Political correctness never corrects real issues. How many commercial jetliners have gone down due to pilot suicide and not pilot error? How many were "suicide bombers"? No one wants to talk about it! MH370 (Indonesia) was a pilot suicide not an accident. EgyptAir just off the coast of Massachusetts was the same thing. GermanWings flight 9525 went straight into the mountain in the Alps.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...es-pilots.html

I always maintained that although the Humboldt accident was very tragic - the number of casualties was greater due to the vehicle weight and had nothing to due with a Class 1 drivers ability. Simply, the man behind the wheel did not exercise due care and attention. In this situation, it was very unlikely that he had an ulterior motives. He blew the stop sign and it would have not mattered if the vehicle was 50 MT or 1 MT - only the gravity of the situation grew larger with vehicle weight.


I was driving with my farmer friend the other day and he has reclaimed a lot of semi tires, wheels and rims from pastures along the #1 Hi-way. Common sense is something that society seems to lack and inventing new rules to cover this is the nature of the game. He says if you look for skid marks on the hi-way, there is almost always a tire at the end of it, somewhere in someone's field! They usually are totally wrecked but they come in duals and tires damaged by the fence wire! The wheel bearings failed and eventually the axle busts off and the tire rolls off into the fields through the fence. Fortunately our hi-ways are not crowded and so far ,it will never be reported until an accident occurs where one of these projectiles kills another innocent driver. It could even by a bus of hockey players, making it even more tragic!

Inspection of vehicles, should involve looking at wheel bearings and their oil levels! Common sense as a farmer means you look to see if their are traces of oil on the rim - just like you do with any farm equipment - tattletale signs of problems. I watch Bison transport everyday hook and unhook double 53 trailers. Dropped off and picked up by the next driver - each on his own run. It would be interesting to see how many inspections are made or if you get in the habit of checking off boxes and signing your name. I am not saying that they are negligent, but everyone is guilty of this offense in one way or another (complacency!). Murphy's Law always proves this. The one time you don't do it, it happens. Finally paperwork gets so heavy that you just go through the motions! If this were not true, DOT would not be always finding problems during non-accident inspections when they stop trucks.

Most people avoid them at all costs and rightly so. If they find one loose gravel stone on a frame, that is unsecured cargo and you will pay the price. Log books kept incorrectly another. Most people keep these on cellphones nowadays. What I can say is that they are made to edit. So much red tape that willful and un-willful errors due occur - making it farcical and a game!

As someone pointed out, everyday each one of us commits an indictable offense by law. Could you imagine a coming day when stepping into a vehicle you are tracked by GPS and satellite to see if you traveled at 101 km/h in a posted 100 km/h zone or you decided to pass someone at 110 km/h in a similar zone to avoid an accident? You receive the infraction, like by photo radar, into your mailbox. Better yet, the process i could be automated to remove this fine from your bank account without even a paper trail!

It is not What you know, it is WHO you know that counts! Currency is a UNIT of debt - not value!
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post #55 of 77 (permalink) Old 02-09-2019, 07:19 PM
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All the rules in the world will not change anything until this province/country deals with the ethnic problem we have. That's maybe racist but Its the truth and until the population realizes that nothing will change. Are the new rules retarded yes for sure they are. As for farmers having having a different class of licence I dont agree on that they should be held to the same standards as everyone else on the road.

How is the Alberta government dealing with testers that literally give away class 1's ? One company gave away over 1500 licenses and they didn't even sit in a truck. It would seem that is the actual problem, but I haven't heard a single mention in the news how that is being dealt with.
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post #56 of 77 (permalink) Old 02-09-2019, 11:21 PM
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I am not trying to bash any farmers here or say they have to do a CIVP every year, I think most guys that care and make sure everything is in running order also care who they put behind the wheel and then there’s always those that don’t care and put anybody behind the wheel and that goes for commercial guys as well, but for commercial guys if they get to many points on there safety code then the company gets shut down, I know a lot of guys would say that never happens but I know of two companies that did get shut down

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post #57 of 77 (permalink) Old 02-09-2019, 11:46 PM
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As someone pointed out, everyday each one of us commits an indictable offense by law. Could you imagine a coming day when stepping into a vehicle you are tracked by GPS and satellite to see if you traveled at 101 km/h in a posted 100 km/h zone or you decided to pass someone at 110 km/h in a similar zone to avoid an accident? You receive the infraction, like by photo radar, into your mailbox. Better yet, the process i could be automated to remove this fine from your bank account without even a paper trail!
I'm not as worried about governments doing this as I am insurance companies, to be honest.

Twenty years ago I was on a tour bus in Turkey that was stopped by the police (fastest speed limit was 90 kph in the country and he was going over 100 easily). Even back then the bus had a black box that recorded speeds continuously over the last 24 hours. Police pulled the report and saw that he'd been going over 120 the previous day and he was hit with a pretty stiff fine. So I guess it's possible we could get that here some day. But I expect insurance companies to force it on us long before governments do. I'd think police in general would oppose it as it would eliminate a lot of their work and local income.
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post #58 of 77 (permalink) Old 02-10-2019, 12:06 PM
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I feel that the emphasis to acquiring a licence should focus more on the actual driving than on the pre-trip. While there are certain very important things to check daily, such as oil levels on axles, tires and lights, in reality I am more concerned about the driving ability of the drivers I meet on the road than if something will fall off of their trucks. These trucks do have to go in every 6 months to a year for inspections to be looked over by professional mechanics who are trained to look for even the less obvious issues. In fact, if accidents are being caused by mechanical issues I would rather see the length between inspections decreased to 3 or 4 months instead and have an actual mechanic looking for the issues instead of people who signed up to be drivers. We are kind of expecting people who want to be drivers to also be mechanics. Some people are very capable in both aspects but there are very good drivers who will never be very mechanically inclined and there are mechanics who will never be top notch drivers. We are kind of forcing a trade on drivers that some simply may not be the best at. Before someone bashes this idea, in reality, if you observe professional truckers in truck stops, very few actually do much more than a quick walk around their truck. They really don't need to either, they know the truck and a good driver will know if something isn't quite right.

I believe that if we want better drivers we need to focus more on the actual driving abilities. Train them on things like properly securing a load and chaining up. It might never be required but when needed those skills are the full responsibility of the driver. Train them how to properly load each axle. Train them on the rules of the road. Train them to drive proactively because these heavy rigs do not respond well to sudden maneuvers. Train them how to be able to handle icy conditions. It might even be best to have a series of driving tests to be certain that the drivers are progressing from novice drivers to more advanced drivers and to accommodate testing in various weather and conditions.

In the end accidents will happen. We are all human. Other trucks and light vehicles have blown through intersections before and hardly make the news because nobody was killed. The only real difference between it being an almost non-event and the situation the truck driver in the Humbolt crash is facing is unlucky timing. We all should all remember that it could happen to us someday. Non of us are immune to causing accidents.
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post #59 of 77 (permalink) Old 02-10-2019, 12:18 PM
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I feel that the emphasis to acquiring a licence should focus more on the actual driving than on the pre-trip. While there are certain very important things to check daily, such as oil levels on axles, tires and lights, in reality I am more concerned about the driving ability of the drivers I meet on the road than if something will fall off of their trucks. These trucks do have to go in every 6 months to a year for inspections to be looked over by professional mechanics who are trained to look for even the less obvious issues. In fact, if accidents are being caused by mechanical issues I would rather see the length between inspections decreased to 3 or 4 months instead and have an actual mechanic looking for the issues instead of people who signed up to be drivers. We are kind of expecting people who want to be drivers to also be mechanics. Some people are very capable in both aspects but there are very good drivers who will never be very mechanically inclined and there are mechanics who will never be top notch drivers. We are kind of forcing a trade on drivers that some simply may not be the best at. Before someone bashes this idea, in reality, if you observe professional truckers in truck stops, very few actually do much more than a quick walk around their truck. They really don't need to either, they know the truck and a good driver will know if something isn't quite right.

I believe that if we want better drivers we need to focus more on the actual driving abilities. Train them on things like properly securing a load and chaining up. It might never be required but when needed those skills are the full responsibility of the driver. Train them how to properly load each axle. Train them on the rules of the road. Train them to drive proactively because these heavy rigs do not respond well to sudden maneuvers. Train them how to be able to handle icy conditions. It might even be best to have a series of driving tests to be certain that the drivers are progressing from novice drivers to more advanced drivers and to accommodate testing in various weather and conditions.

In the end accidents will happen. We are all human. Other trucks and light vehicles have blown through intersections before and hardly make the news because nobody was killed. The only real difference between it being an almost non-event and the situation the truck driver in the Humbolt crash is facing is unlucky timing. We all should all remember that it could happen to us someday. Non of us are immune to causing accidents.
Great post. And at drivers ED Train the young drivers not to cutoff the hiway trucks there bigger than you and need three time longer to stop!
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post #60 of 77 (permalink) Old 02-10-2019, 01:32 PM
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I donít know if youíll be able to view this picture or not Iíve never posted pictures before,
I was hauling this rig last spring 150í long gross wieght 117 ton

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