VR seeding Pea Canola Intercrop? - Page 2 - The Combine Forum
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post #11 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-11-2019, 10:50 AM
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A query for those that have grown peas and canola together previously.

Did you notice an impact on pea nodulation and vigour?
We tried some fodder rape/pea/oat mix in a grazing scenario and the pea vigour seemed to be markedly decreased vs other paddocks that just had pea & oats.

Curious if anyone else had observed this, I was guessing this may be due to the fodder rape acting as a bio-fumigant(?). Peas were innoculated during sowing.

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post #12 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-11-2019, 11:32 AM
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I'll get back to this thread later but I am going to make a quick point
Nothing in nature is a monoculture

You got my interest!

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post #13 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-11-2019, 02:19 PM
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Originally Posted by BrianTee View Post
Why not just seed a good crop of canola 1 year, then a good crop of peas the next year?
The "Why" is the key to everything with this. Your Canadian research farms have proved the why when compared to standard farming practices. I don't know how the economics would compare to high input farmers that can get 60+ bushel canola in a given year, but I suppose that is for another thread...
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post #14 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-11-2019, 02:44 PM
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Every time intercropping shows up, especially since it's usually about peaola, my question is how do you address disease issues? The easiest, most guaranteed way to control disease is increase your rotation, especially with clubroot. Around here, at least before canola market took a nosedive, guys have been reluctantly going back to peas as a rotation-extending tool between canola years. Seems to me that a canola-cereal-pea-cereal rotation is the ideal rotation to limit canola to 1-in-4 years to control clubroot.

Intercropping peas and canola takes that tool away. You'll still be increasing your spore load.

If you're in an aphanomyces area, that must be considered as well.

These seem like good reasons "why not".

If we had more crop options, I'd be intercropping already.

RE: the OP, varying the seeding rate as you describe (more peas on the high areas, more canola in the lows) makes sense to me, the peas don't like wet feet and will do better on the high land if you get any significant amount of moisture, and the canola will make better use of the moisture in the lows. I think canola is more salt tolerant too.

If I were you, though, I'd still do a couple passes at fixed rates, and do your own trial to compare; hopefully you have a cart to take weights.

Last edited by Marusko; 04-11-2019 at 02:51 PM.
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post #15 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-11-2019, 04:59 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by 8850Champion View Post
The "Why" is the key to everything with this. Your Canadian research farms have proved the why when compared to standard farming practices. I don't know how the economics would compare to high input farmers that can get 60+ bushel canola in a given year, but I suppose that is for another thread...
How did the canola variety you used last year work out as far as maturity?
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post #16 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-11-2019, 05:18 PM Thread Starter
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Every time intercropping shows up, especially since it's usually about peaola, my question is how do you address disease issues? The easiest, most guaranteed way to control disease is increase your rotation, especially with clubroot. Around here, at least before canola market took a nosedive, guys have been reluctantly going back to peas as a rotation-extending tool between canola years. Seems to me that a canola-cereal-pea-cereal rotation is the ideal rotation to limit canola to 1-in-4 years to control clubroot.

Intercropping peas and canola takes that tool away. You'll still be increasing your spore load.

If you're in an aphanomyces area, that must be considered as well.

These seem like good reasons "why not".

If we had more crop options, I'd be intercropping already.

RE: the OP, varying the seeding rate as you describe (more peas on the high areas, more canola in the lows) makes sense to me, the peas don't like wet feet and will do better on the high land if you get any significant amount of moisture, and the canola will make better use of the moisture in the lows. I think canola is more salt tolerant too.

If I were you, though, I'd still do a couple passes at fixed rates, and do your own trial to compare; hopefully you have a cart to take weights.
No clubroot here yet. The canola, cereal, pulse, cereal rotation is a popular one here too. The field I'm looking at is virgin pea ground and has grown canola once. I get your point though and it has occurred to me as well. This is why I'm not doing huge acres. More of a field here and there. It does make the placement of the mono crop canola difficult. While not ideal cereal cereal can be done and having peas or a pulse twice every 5 years doesn't seem burdensome to me but it depends completely on the rainfall during the year. Hate to give up a year of canola but maybe this is the year to do it? Ha

I did several trials when I grew it 3 years ago. Had a screen cleaner set up at the elevator so I could use the scale. Only had 30 acres but being a one man show with several trials it took all day ha. Will have peas across the road. Will have to see how ambitious I am when the rubber hits the road.
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post #17 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-11-2019, 06:16 PM
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How did the canola variety you used last year work out as far as maturity?
The peas were still mature a little earlier (maybe a week?) than the canola. I didn't lose any to shelling, but by the time they got to the bin there were some cracks because they were plenty dry. I'm gonna use the same varieties again as I don't see any Clearfield canola varieties that are earlier maturing than the Pioneer that I used. Gonna flat rate mine again this year. My seeding rates and fertility rates are tuned for the peas winning the battle more so than canola... We shall see!
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post #18 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-11-2019, 08:16 PM
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I think research on the disease angle needs to be done. But my hypothesis is that intercropping may be beneficial to reducing the spore load in the soil. We already know that peaola requires less (or no) fungicide for common leaf diseases. I suspect soil-borne diseases would also be reduced. Fungicide in general is really bad for the soil. Who knows what diseases are getting worse as fungicide kills off the beneficial fungi in the soil.
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post #19 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-12-2019, 12:30 AM
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There is a lot of concern about volunteer RR canola in soybeans and then it not being a break year from canola because it contributes to the spore load, I don't see an intercrop being any different. Either you are growing canola or not IMO, why bother with a half crop and eliminate having it as a monocrop in your rotation? Unless you are low input and wouldn't manage for high yield anyways then maybe an intercrop would net the same, I don't know. But neither of those crops reach maturity at the same time so something has to give. I would also be concerned about using my canola bullet without getting a group 10 Chemical in the chem rotation. Obviously I'm not sold on inter-cropping, so maybe my advice is useless on this one...
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post #20 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-12-2019, 01:18 AM
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There is a lot of concern about volunteer RR canola in soybeans and then it not being a break year from canola because it contributes to the spore load, I don't see an intercrop being any different. Either you are growing canola or not IMO, why bother with a half crop and eliminate having it as a monocrop in your rotation? Unless you are low input and wouldn't manage for high yield anyways then maybe an intercrop would net the same, I don't know. But neither of those crops reach maturity at the same time so something has to give. I would also be concerned about using my canola bullet without getting a group 10 Chemical in the chem rotation. Obviously I'm not sold on inter-cropping, so maybe my advice is useless on this one...
I use it as a means to add diversity to my rotation +/- 10 crops total. I can't grow peas or lentils by themselves due to disease in average to wetter then average years because of way too many peas/lentils over the last 25 years. Much like the OP I see it as a way to have a pulse in my rotation with less risk of having a total loss on half the field if it isn't a dry year. I've experimented on and off with this for the last 3 years and I there are a few things that I don't have dialed, but the results are promising... If you and others on this thread are profitable with your current rotation/agronomics then that's awesome,

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