Silly irrigation question from a dryland guy - Page 3 - The Combine Forum
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post #21 of 42 (permalink) Old 04-11-2007, 05:00 PM
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Re: Silly irrigation question from a dryland guy

Farmboy,

Judging by the fact that you mention sandhills, and you bought a T&L, I'll venture a guess you are in western Nebraska?

I wasn't meaning to imply that pivot speed is important. All I meant was if you are limited by a 1000GPM well, in order to get a good soaking 1 inch pass, you would have to run a 1/2 mile pivot so slow it would be 8 or 9 days to get around?? Maybe I'm missing something, like I said, I am guessing based of 1/4 miler experience, never ran a 1/2 miler.

All of the new pivots we have installed have been T&L. They aren't near as popular here than the Zimms and Valleys, but I think they are hands down the simplest and most robust designed pivot out there.
I am reminded of that every summer when we are working on the older Valley's and Zimmatics changing out the normal one gearbox per system per year when its 110 out and it pumped a nice big mudhole before it stopped.

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post #22 of 42 (permalink) Old 04-11-2007, 10:50 PM
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Re: Silly irrigation question from a dryland guy

Where we live the Zimm's are made 20 minutes away and there are no full section fields to speak of so if a guy would happen to land on a full irrigated section of ground it would have four Quarter mile systems on it already more than likely. Just my .02

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post #23 of 42 (permalink) Old 11-06-2007, 10:50 AM
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Re: Silly irrigation question from a dryland guy

Quote:No nothing about Pivots
so question when people say they farm 5 pivots or 10 pivots how many acres is that ? is a pivot always the same acres ?


Pivots are not all the same size, depends on the # of towers, end guns, etc.

A normal pivot I believe is around 120 acres water and 4 corners at 40 acres or 10 acres a corner... for a quarter section anyway 160 acres.
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post #24 of 42 (permalink) Old 11-06-2007, 09:20 PM
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Re: Silly irrigation question from a dryland guy

For a quarter mile system with a good booster pump on the end gun it should irrigate 132 acres per circle. 7 acres are left on each corner. With a corner system on it you are up to about 155 acres on a full circle but you have to add another 30,000 to the price of your pivot. Our quarter mile systems are rated at between 8 and 900 gpms and if I remember right it takes about 3 days to make a circle putting 1 inch down.
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post #25 of 42 (permalink) Old 11-08-2007, 07:42 PM
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Re: Silly irrigation question from a dryland guy

They do make towable systems. We operate six towable quarter-milers and usually move them twice a year. We'll start in the spring watering corn, milo, or something like that. When that's mature in late summer we move the sprinkler to the adjacent field and get ready to water wheat. In the spring when the wheat starts to turn, we'll move it back for the next year of spring crops. It's a royal pain, especially in dry years. Sometimes it gets hard to keep up with the water needs of two different crops.

I've seen drag lines once watering some new CRP grass, but here out west they're not very efficient. 100 degree temps, 30mph winds, and 9% humidity make for a lot of evaporation loss. Our goal is to apply the water as close to the ground as possible to minimize evaporation. Plus, drag lines take a lot of work and we switched to pivots because of lower labor requirements.

Pivots don't really take a lot of work aside from annual maintenance and the inevitable flat tire, bad gearbox, stuck tower, or some combination of the three.* We just drive by in the morning and evening and make sure it's still running and all the towers are in line, then check the irrigation motor. If you don't have any problems it just takes a few minutes a day per sprinkler.

*There are a hundred other things that can go wrong, but I think you get the idea.

We run six hydraulic drive sprinklers and two electrics. All but one of our towable units are hydraulic; we like them because they have on-board jacks that make turning tires a breeze. The electrics require us to carry a Hi-Lift jack through the field (or use the backhoe if we're lucky)**. The hydraulic drives seem to cause more problems as they age. This year we had a lot of problems with hoses blowing. It always seems to happen in the night, so by morning you have to work in a lake to fix it. We have less problems with electrics, but they're harder to fix when something goes wrong (heavy gearboxes, 480V power, etc.)

**My dad and I once turned all the tires on an 8-tower Valley in 38 minutes. We were using a Hi-Lift in ripening wheat, without a vehicle. That's got to be a record or something.

How much water applied per year is all dependent on the crop being grown, how much rainfall is received during the season, and the weather conditions during the year. There's been years here where guys started their wells in February and didn't turn them off until September. Those aren't good years.

Generally, corn will take more water than wheat or milo. Every year is a little bit different, though. We've got 6.5-7 inches of water applied to the wheat already. In a good year we'd only have to apply one or two inches to get the wheat up then it would be set for the winter, but droughts kinda throw a wrench into things.


Here's one of our T&L towables. You can see the jack hanging from the frame between the wheels.

Kevin

edit: Added the pic.
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post #26 of 42 (permalink) Old 11-09-2007, 09:10 PM
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Re: Silly irrigation question from a dryland guy

A pivot saves time and if you're willing to pay, then it's worth it. We have a T-L towable that runs a 1/2 circle and a little over 3/4 circle.
God created wheat and dryland corn so irrigators would have a crop to put on pivot corners.lol
We had a pivot corner of dryland corn this year that just about made more than the irrigated right next to it.
We also have a Valley with a corner arm system that supposedly doubled the cost of the pivot. A lot of the money goes into buring the wire to guide the arm.

Joe C.
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post #27 of 42 (permalink) Old 11-10-2007, 03:19 PM
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Re: Silly irrigation question from a dryland guy

I heard that they are using GPS on sprinklers now to turn the end gun on and off and guide the corner catcher system. Sure makes sense to use GPS as it's being used for everything these days.
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post #28 of 42 (permalink) Old 11-11-2007, 04:56 PM
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Re: Silly irrigation question from a dryland guy

I don't know about now but 5 years ago Valley still buried wire to guide the corner arm.

Joe C.
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post #29 of 42 (permalink) Old 11-13-2007, 07:55 PM
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Re: Silly irrigation question from a dryland guy

Reinke makes one that uses GPS to guide cornersystems and where to shut off and turn on end guns. Valley had one in the works but not sure where they are at. I think you would need an extemely accurate and repeatable sytem or you would have trouble with corner systems fighting to get out of existing tracks if the position isn't identicle each time around. For end gun shut offs it would work fine.
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post #30 of 42 (permalink) Old 11-27-2007, 10:51 PM
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Re: Silly irrigation question from a dryland guy

at less then 90 degrees in my opinion wouldnt b efficient. and yes they can actually now even turn pivots on and off with gps that including the well.

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