What a find - The Combine Forum
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Unread Yesterday, 02:08 AM Thread Starter
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What a find

Ok, i have been going through all of the building in my yard, one by one, cleaning up and throwing out a ton of obsolete crap. I found one of my Grandpa (1895-1986) old spool of twine (hemp) for his binder, i have the binder still in the valley that he bought brand new, the year not known, i also have the canvasses for in in the rafters in one of the granaries in remarkable shape still serviceable. I have found his owners manual for a McCormick-Deering Grain binder. beside the fact it is a very memorable piece of my families history. I find the twine in amazing shape like he bought it yesterday, it has got to be close to over 90 years old. This binder was the only new piece of harvesting equipment ever bought in three generations. I thought i would share some history of a man who survived WW1 Poland, to walk here and live his dream of owning 160 acres.
Also is the first combine my dad ever bought was a Cockshutt 112 (1945) that also sits next to the binder. also some pics of the owner's manual.
Interesting note, the binder manual is bilingual (french). I don't know what to do with it, also have a half a can of harness oil for oiling the harness of his work horses. Just blows my mind the time it crosses. I have more stuff in the back that has to be gone through.
Point of interest, the Cockshutt combine has a hand crank table lift, LOL. Can you imagine HAND CRANK, He converted it to hydraulic, it was the big mod of the day. Frickin hilarious.
Just noticed in the binder manual, the corners of the pages or folded on the the knotter adjustment page, and knot troubleshooting page.

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Last edited by Combine Pilot; Yesterday at 02:30 AM.
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Unread Yesterday, 02:38 AM
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Barn
It's really neat to have that stuff!
I moved onto my grandparents farm 6 years ago. I am 4th generation and there are lots of things around here too, equipment, harnesses, books... all nostalgic.
But what kinda hit me just the other day... I acquired grandma and grandpas 80's triple E motorhome and driving it home from my uncle's place turned on the radio, it started playing a tape.... a tape I so vividly remembered listening to on our way to the Pysanka festival in Vegreville, and numerous fishing and camping trips they took us on...... then I looked up and saw grandpas CB radio he put in........... he passed a few years ago now, but the memories we have of our late family are reignited buy the seemingly silliest things left lying around the homestead.


Keep calm and combine on....
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Unread Yesterday, 10:07 AM
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Good morning! Its really neat to hear these stories.Combine pilot I also have (whats left) a Mcormick Deering binder manual that was my Grandfathers , and its also bilingual. Considering its a pre-1920's piece of machinery , that speaks volumes for the amount of machinerey they sold in Canada at that time. Where we farm ( NW of Maple Creek , Sk. ) I am the fourth generation to live here since 1910 , and I am living in the house my Grandfather and Great Grandfather built in 1916, which I'm pretty proud of. My son is 13 and he is the fifth generation to live here. I turned 50 in April , and I have noticed that i'm getting more nostalgic as I get older. I have a box of old manuals , newspapers , machinery flyers ( some of which I have laminated) reciepts of equipment my Dad bought years ago , you name it . Looking at old tax returns from the pre- World War one era is such a reality check to the modern age today. I truly think that we are only ahead in the convenience side of life . Those people back then were tougher than we are , but they did not have as many outside factors chewing away at them every day like we do. That is my opinion , maybe no the right one , but it's mine!

I have a whole bag full of letters that my Great Grandpa sent home from the early 1920's when he was down in the USA looking for land,etc. but they are all in German "script" and I don't know where to go for help for deciphering them. My Dad is 93 , and even he has no idea as to how to translate them , and I fear that I have a wealth of information on my past that I can't access.

ANY help would be appreciated!
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Unread Yesterday, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by cropwellfarm View Post
Good morning! Its really neat to hear these stories.Combine pilot I also have (whats left) a Mcormick Deering binder manual that was my Grandfathers , and its also bilingual. Considering its a pre-1920's piece of machinery , that speaks volumes for the amount of machinerey they sold in Canada at that time. Where we farm ( NW of Maple Creek , Sk. ) I am the fourth generation to live here since 1910 , and I am living in the house my Grandfather and Great Grandfather built in 1916, which I'm pretty proud of. My son is 13 and he is the fifth generation to live here. I turned 50 in April , and I have noticed that i'm getting more nostalgic as I get older. I have a box of old manuals , newspapers , machinery flyers ( some of which I have laminated) reciepts of equipment my Dad bought years ago , you name it . Looking at old tax returns from the pre- World War one era is such a reality check to the modern age today. I truly think that we are only ahead in the convenience side of life . Those people back then were tougher than we are , but they did not have as many outside factors chewing away at them every day like we do. That is my opinion , maybe no the right one , but it's mine!

I have a whole bag full of letters that my Great Grandpa sent home from the early 1920's when he was down in the USA looking for land,etc. but they are all in German "script" and I don't know where to go for help for deciphering them. My Dad is 93 , and even he has no idea as to how to translate them , and I fear that I have a wealth of information on my past that I can't access.

ANY help would be appreciated!
Could you post a picture of the German script? I might know somebody that could translate it
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Unread Yesterday, 10:09 PM
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Hi cropwellfarms,
I went to school in Germany and in the sixties we learned to read Suetterlin writing, If it is in Latin letters its no problem at all . I could translate, but let harvest our crops first,
regards Martin
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Unread Yesterday, 11:55 PM
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Those things are keepsakes. I cherish everything my grandpa taught me or used. I have an old rusty .22 cooey pump he used to carry on his W6 international with a 6 volt spot light to get an occasional deer lol. Got his old felt hat too. He cleared more land by hand in his lifetime by horse and hand then most could even imagine. Cordwood was currency and he would harvest all the wood and break the land, then move on to where there were more trees, and start all over. His hands were huge and so were his shoulders and his heart as well. Sunday although he wasn't really religious was a day of doing something all together as family. Could be gardening or travelling on a trailer behind the W6 to pick berries. Where did we go wrong? Most of our ancestors did this or is this just my grandfather that did it? He wasn't wealthy but we felt like we had everything we needed to be happy. He raised 3 kids and had cows and a farm to take care of and still found the time to spend 1 day a week with his family.
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Unread Today, 09:07 AM
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Thank you. when you are done harvest , contact me . Very appreciated!

Make every Day count for something!
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Unread Today, 06:05 PM
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Originally Posted by cropwellfarm View Post
Good morning! Its really neat to hear these stories.Combine pilot I also have (whats left) a Mcormick Deering binder manual that was my Grandfathers , and its also bilingual. Considering its a pre-1920's piece of machinery , that speaks volumes for the amount of machinerey they sold in Canada at that time. Where we farm ( NW of Maple Creek , Sk. ) I am the fourth generation to live here since 1910 , and I am living in the house my Grandfather and Great Grandfather built in 1916, which I'm pretty proud of. My son is 13 and he is the fifth generation to live here. I turned 50 in April , and I have noticed that i'm getting more nostalgic as I get older. I have a box of old manuals , newspapers , machinery flyers ( some of which I have laminated) reciepts of equipment my Dad bought years ago , you name it . Looking at old tax returns from the pre- World War one era is such a reality check to the modern age today. I truly think that we are only ahead in the convenience side of life . Those people back then were tougher than we are , but they did not have as many outside factors chewing away at them every day like we do. That is my opinion , maybe no the right one , but it's mine!

I have a whole bag full of letters that my Great Grandpa sent home from the early 1920's when he was down in the USA looking for land,etc. but they are all in German "script" and I don't know where to go for help for deciphering them. My Dad is 93 , and even he has no idea as to how to translate them , and I fear that I have a wealth of information on my past that I can't access.

ANY help would be appreciated!
My great aunt can read German, but do you know what kind of German you were? My Mom and Dadís familyís are of German descent but came from Russia, they speak a low German. My Momís Aunt (married Momís Uncle) was from Germany. She said she learned German from her parents and can read and write it, as long as itís the same dialect.
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