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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-04-2009, 11:14 AM Thread Starter
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shop heating

we have a 60 by 100 steel shed that we want to turn into a shop its got a cement floor in it already, now I know floor heat is the best but can you make floor heat with cement thats already poored, what else is the best heat to heat it and insulation.

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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-04-2009, 06:09 PM
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Re: shop heating

I would love to know the answer to whether or not one can install infloor heating in a shed that has a cement floor already installed as well; anyone done it or looked into it?

Maple,
We have been debating doing this for sometime now, we were thinking that we could put the hose down and then just poor a few inches of concrete over top of the hoses, but am not sure if this will work or if it is a good idea. I would like to talk to someone that has tried it or to a company that specializes in infloor heating.

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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-04-2009, 08:16 PM
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Re: shop heating

Unless someone chimes in and says their uncle's neighbor did it, I'd say no. Radiant-heating tubing has to be laid before the concrete is poured. It's tied into the reinforcing mesh.
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-06-2009, 01:48 AM
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Re: shop heating

If you have concrete and want to put in floor tube heating you should tear out the current concrete. The system is too expensive to not do it correctly. Protect your investment. If done correctly a reflective insulation is rolled down first. A sheet of wire mesh is then laid down to attach the tube runs to and then rebar is laid out on top just like you would for a normal concrete floor. In floor heat will be the most expensive upfront install by far.

Radiant tubes from the ceiling or forced air (any fuel) are your best options if you can't part with your current concrete.
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-06-2009, 12:55 PM
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Re: shop heating

Of course you put down tubing and pour a couple of inches of cement over top. It would have to have small rock in the concrete though for it to settle out properly and get the correct finish on the top. It will not be insulated under the slab or on the sides, so if you live in a cold climate you will have some heat loss.

From a pure heat situation, the top of the slab is where you want your heat pipes. It has enough concrete for a heat sink and it will radiate upwards very well. If you place your heat pipes deep down below the concrete, you loose much more heat into the ground, as it is harder to radiate through the mass upwards.

Downside to being in the top of the concrete is that you have to be carefull when drilling/nailing, etc. that you don't hit it. Make sure that you put in several different loops beside each other so that if one should leak that you can turn it off and just use the rest. If you put a loop outside the door and cover it you can melt the snow off the outside pad also.
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-10-2009, 11:26 AM
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Re: shop heating

We have had excellent luck (and cost savings over forced air) with Infrared tube heaters.

It warms objects not the air, once the floor and everything else is warm it doesn't take much to keep the place warm.

You will notice that you can open doors and run equipment in and out without loosing the heat that is already in the objects in the room. This translates into faster recovery of shop temps.

IMHO you can't go wrong with tube heaters.
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-19-2009, 07:19 PM
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Re: shop heating

If you can get enough oil to keep you going thru winter, a used oil burner works very well. There's always people wanting to get rid of used oil, just be sure it doesn't have water or anything else in it. Makes it hard to keep burner going.
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-07-2009, 06:48 PM
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Re: shop heating

I agree with 5thgen radiant would be your best bet. Used oil heaters work depending on your oil supply and the size of your shop, and what your ambient temps are. One hanger I used to work in had a used oil heater in it. If you wanted to get warm you had to cut your oil with jet fuel. Otherwise the straight oil didn't spray good enough to burn very well.
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-07-2009, 09:42 PM
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Re: shop heating

Here is the link to the insulation, and heating package we are putting in our shop........... http://www.thermaldesign.com/ ........This is your best bet the HVAC units are under accessories then energy craft HVAC......They will take your shop specs recommend insulation then a HVAC setup. It also comes with ceiling fans. The radiant heat sucks because if you pull a truck in to work on it it warms the top of the truck, but it's cold on the floor.
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-03-2009, 07:17 AM
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Re: shop heating

im getting in late on this conversation but someone is going to read this again. what if you rented one of those big carbide concrete saws and cut trenches in old floor lay down pipe lay rebar on top for later line location and poured new layer cement over? im no contractor or pro just a farmer thinkin out loud. concrete is expensive where i live and there are alot of buildings outthere that could benifit from floor heat but not a complete new floor

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