2019 Drought in Prairies - Page 2 - The Combine Forum
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post #11 of 334 (permalink) Old 05-30-2019, 10:35 PM
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15-20 bu/ac was about the average yield for many dryland farmers in southern Alberta last year.

Have a neighbor that farms much like Brian does, using a stripper header to leave the straw standing. This spring we had a blizzard that pretty much blew straight over my fields leaving them bare and I'm pretty sure it all ended up in his stubble where it melted in. Being able to take advantage of that kind of moisture has to really help. Always wondered with tall straw, some of which gets pushed over by the tractor and drill, what affect is there on herbicide application? Is coverage through the straw an issue, or does the straw cover actually keep some weeds from getting a foothold?

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post #12 of 334 (permalink) Old 05-30-2019, 10:44 PM
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A cloud like that would be good for an all day soaker around here, would gladly share with you.

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post #13 of 334 (permalink) Old 05-30-2019, 11:56 PM
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Around supper time tonight the wind got up and it was like the dirty 30's. The dirt was blowing, the air was full of dust, and your eyes got full of dirt when you went outside to enjoy the dirt filled air.
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post #14 of 334 (permalink) Old 05-31-2019, 12:11 AM
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jeez what an optimistic bunch.......
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post #15 of 334 (permalink) Old 05-31-2019, 12:22 AM
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Originally Posted by GrowerNotAShower View Post
Younger guy here, central SK. So, if it doesnít rain for the next two weeks, then maybe just an inch here and there after that, exactly had bad could yields be? Moisture under the top soil doesnít seem too too bad surprisingly (for now) but I donít know if that means much. Will earlier seeded pulses/cereals with a bit of roots already make out better despite moisture? I contracted a little more new crop wheat than I should have...
Well, now you know you aren't in a drought! Come back when you get some real stories like the recent posters...

AN ERROR DOESN'T BECOME A MISTAKE UNTIL YOU REFUSE TO CORRECT IT
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post #16 of 334 (permalink) Old 05-31-2019, 08:09 AM
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This is the 3rd year in a row for us receiving very little rain, last year crop was OK, but very little rain through growing season. But this spring is a doozy, we haven't had any measurable moisture for over 2 months. Wht and barley came up but look spindly, my fall rye is done even if it rained a ton, and canola is turning into a disaster, just very poor germination. hay crops are screwed, and pastures are a wreck. Other than that I'm loving life, just sick of the uncontrollable expenses. Input costs and fuel are ridiculous, canola seed is a crime, along with a lot of other expenses that are driven by us farmers(land rent at $120 a acre)??? wth?? I consider myself a older farmer, and I know a lot of younger guys in my area take very little risk management because they haven't farmed through the drought years. A lot of younger guys don't carry crop insurance cause it doesn't cover there expenses, sorry but that's a mistake. It may not cover all your expenses, but it could get you through if need be. Oh well I've seen this before, so its not new to me, lock on your caps and lets hope it changes.
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post #17 of 334 (permalink) Old 05-31-2019, 09:35 AM
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Agree grizzer. I wonder how many people understand how average rainfall is determined for an area and where the last +10 years fit in the calculation. It's actually pretty hard to find data on historical rainfall so this is the best link I can refer too. Maybe someone else can find better, and they should because these are things that matter.

Long-term performance of slab-on-grade house foundations in Regina, Saskatchewan :*NH18-22/109-100E-PDF - Government of Canada Publications - Canada.ca
The pdf in the link has a rainfall chart for Regina area, we just went through the early 1950s phase and are around 1957 on the chart. If you are penciling out your farm operation for the next 10 years based on the what the rainfall has been for the last 10 then I think you will be disappointed. I beleive there is a 60 year cycle at play therefore we just went through the 1950s, even if you disagree with that you better understand what is normal rainfall for your area, how vastly it varies year over year and where in the historical average you are basing future projections on. Low rainfall is not a symptom of global warming, it is a normal occurrence on the prairies. And just because previous 60 years does not show 3 very dry years in a row, that does not mean those were the worst years in recent history.
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post #18 of 334 (permalink) Old 05-31-2019, 11:29 AM
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Very interesting stats Ken, rainfall and slab construction! I agree that these medium long term trends tell us a lot about what is normal. Change and variability has always been the norm on the prairies. We want the perfect conditions every year but that is not normal. Based on the 60 year cycle theory, looks like it might be drier than average for a while. But who knows? It is the weather. Just an observation I made about 4 years ago while driving from Regina to Saskatoon at 100 km/hr, many of the old mature trees growing in a ring around the edge of sloughs were all under water and dead. Says to me that recently there has been more moisture than previously. I hope we all get a good rain soon.
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post #19 of 334 (permalink) Old 05-31-2019, 11:47 AM
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It comes back to the 2 Johns - Macoun and Palliser. Are the prairies a verdant paradise or an arid desert? It just depends when you visit. There's a reason why we have a black soil zone extending from Brandon to Red Deer and a brown zone beneath it. Hang onto your hats - it could be the start of 7 lean years or it might rain tomorrow. It must have rained across northern SK yesterday but the fire map for the province is still pretty well solid red.

R.J.(Bob) Evans

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post #20 of 334 (permalink) Old 05-31-2019, 05:37 PM
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Very interesting stats Ken, rainfall and slab construction! I agree that these medium long term trends tell us a lot about what is normal. Change and variability has always been the norm on the prairies. We want the perfect conditions every year but that is not normal. Based on the 60 year cycle theory, looks like it might be drier than average for a while. But who knows? It is the weather. Just an observation I made about 4 years ago while driving from Regina to Saskatoon at 100 km/hr, many of the old mature trees growing in a ring around the edge of sloughs were all under water and dead. Says to me that recently there has been more moisture than previously. I hope we all get a good rain soon.

I've been noticing that around here this year and last year with old stone piles out in the sloughs. Even with the last couple dry years, some of these piles aren't even completely out of the water yet, so it makes a guy wonder, how freakin' dry was it when they were put there? Some of the stones are a good size, so not like they were carried by hand, most likely dragged in by horses or very early tractors, and they don't just move over a slough bed that dried up in the fall.

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It's easy enough to be pleasant, when life goes by like a song. But the man worth while, is the man with a smile, when everything goes dead wrong!
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