Farm shops - Page 9 - The Combine Forum
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post #81 of 90 (permalink) Old 01-20-2019, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by drylandfarmer View Post
My shop accounts for roughly 40% of my total gas bill. House and shop are on same meter. So some pretty rough numbers here. Can't really say about electricity costs as there are too many variables so I'll just give you the natural gas heating costs.

I will use last years numbers as we had a very cold winter in 17/18.
Taking 40% of the natural gas consumption for the 6 month heating season I came up with 175GJ to heat the shop. Our current gas cost is $2.24/GJ plus $1.5 for cost of service for a total of $3.74 per GJ.

Thats a total heating cost of $654 for the winter heating season or about $109 per month.

This year's costs will be down a bit with a warmer winter.

I'm not including the stupid Alberta Carbon Levy of $1.517 per GJ or $265 for the winter as this is a BS tax that I'm confident will go away with a new spring government.
While doing some research before building my shop many years ago, I came across a little book printed by Alberta Ag. The thing that really left an impression on me was a section where they talked about using really good insulation and doors. The example shop was 40x60x16. That' 2400 sq ft. They broke down heat loss into ceiling, walls, windows, doors, foundation, floor. With R40 ceiling, R20 walls, and a modest R value in the grade beam and maybe floor, the whole BTU requirement for the building was only 14,000 btu. That was with no doors or windows. Then you start adding BTU for all the perforations in that perfectly sealed wall. 40,000 BTU for a big OH door 20x14 and on and on. So you can see how important good doors and windows are.

If you want to do a little number crunching as to heating cost for your proposed building, just expand these numbers by a per cent factor. One GJ of energy equals 948,000 btu. Since BTU is for a time of one hour, then you must multiply your BTU rating for your building x 24 hours if you keep your heat on all the time. For example in my shop, similar size and numbers to the example, if I use 50,000 BTU total heat loss would be 948,000 btu/ GJ divided by 50,000 BTU per hour = 19 hours per GJ of energy. So 19 hours for the cost per GJ of energy, say 3.00 plus the carbon tax that we all hope goes away!! of 1.50 ?? equals $4.50 for 19 hours = .24 cents per hour or $5.76 per day. I always looked at it like it was no more expensive to heat my shop than to have a couple of vehicles plugged in 24/7. The benefits were obvious.

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post #82 of 90 (permalink) Old 01-20-2019, 04:09 PM
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Is anyone having trouble with their bifold’s freezing to the building during the winter?

My uncles shop has a 30-35ft or so and they pretty much hate it. I should have asked who’s door it was.
I have a few bi-folds on the farm, two on the heated shop. Of the two on the shop one is on a wood frame and the other has an integral I-beam frame that it closes against. The one with the steel frame is prone to freezing and tearing the seals off if it is used a lot and humidity present in the building. I was using the tractor and blower every day a couple years back and it was a real problem, ended up putting fans inside to keep it from freezing. The metal transmits cold too easily. It was a handy thing to install for me because it stuck above the roof line and it is structural, but next time I would try to frame it with wood. Diamond door.



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post #83 of 90 (permalink) Old 01-20-2019, 06:51 PM
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Very rough numbers but our 1440 ft2 house cost about $100 in gas and $250 electric. Once we added the 60x80 shop(in floor gas boiler) both doubled I would say.
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post #84 of 90 (permalink) Old 01-20-2019, 08:59 PM
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When I built my house in 2003, I put in double pane windows only. That was a big mistake, would like a do-over on that one.

Built my shop in 2016 and put in triple pane energy efficient windows in. Huge difference in my opinion. My house windows are always cold to the touch and cold near them. Shop windows are not cold at all and you don't feel that cold air feeling when beside them.

Might replace some of the windows in our home someday. That is unless the shop is in need of something first..........
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post #85 of 90 (permalink) Old 01-24-2019, 12:59 PM
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I have a Prairie Steel building. There are a couple of things that I really like about it over a wood framed building.
The first is that the ceiling between the roof trusses (usually 20 to 25 ft apart) follows the slope of the roof so if you are working on something high like combine just park it between the roof trusses and you have a few more feet of headroom if you need to get on top of the equipment to work.
The second is that I had an I-beam used for the bottom of each roof truss and now I have a place to put overhead hoists that can be rolled from side to side of the shop. I do plan on building a rolling frame between two of the trusses so that I will be able to move the hoist in both directions. So far I have two electric chain hoists on one of the I-beams which are great for pick stuff up, once I get a frame build they will be even better.

As far a doors go the building has a 40.5 ft X 18 ft Diamond bi-fold in centered in one end and a 20ft wide by 16 ft overhead door offset to one side in the other end. This works well most of the time, as always there are times a person wishes they were bigger.
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post #86 of 90 (permalink) Old 01-30-2019, 03:55 PM
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Some good discussion in this thread. I have a question to add into the mix. I’m a couple years away from building a heated farm shop and cold storage shop. Would it be best to build the two as one building and a wall in between the cold storage and heated or build them as separate buildings? Trying to think of pros and cons. Having one building would be nice but wouldn’t be able to drive right through unless went through the width way. Thoughts?
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post #87 of 90 (permalink) Old 01-30-2019, 04:19 PM
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It would definatley be cheaper to build the two shops as one because you are eliminating one wall. The only downside would be if fire strikes it will take out both shops if they are one building. You would have all your eggs in one basket. It seems the bigger the claim with insurance the less likely they are to pay out.
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post #88 of 90 (permalink) Old 01-30-2019, 04:23 PM
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Originally Posted by K-MAN View Post
Some good discussion in this thread. I have a question to add into the mix. I’m a couple years away from building a heated farm shop and cold storage shop. Would it be best to build the two as one building and a wall in between the cold storage and heated or build them as separate buildings? Trying to think of pros and cons. Having one building would be nice but wouldn’t be able to drive right through unless went through the width way. Thoughts?

Depends a bit on size you are building and local regulations. My cousin builds pole sheds/shops and said the most common size he puts up is 60x100' because any more square feet and it gets classified as commercial and requires an engineer to sign off on the plans. That adds a lot of extra cost. We were talking about a 60x140 that was split and he said it because that would have been commercial it would have been cheaper to build as 2 separate buildings.
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post #89 of 90 (permalink) Old 01-30-2019, 04:28 PM
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I don’t think you have to worry about the “commercial” thing in Saskatchewan.

I would build two separate buildings. Won’t cost a whole lot more. Leaves more options open in the future.

Brent.
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post #90 of 90 (permalink) Old 01-30-2019, 05:58 PM
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We bought a big combined (hot and cold) building from Prairie Steel. With the steel frame construction, and cladding the interior of the warm side, we're not that worried about fire destroying the entire thing. Not sure how much money we saved, but given the location requirements, this combined building fits us far better than two separate buildings.

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Last edited by torriem; 01-30-2019 at 07:43 PM.
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