Biggest round baler - Page 3 - The Combine Forum
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post #21 of 23 (permalink) Old 02-21-2019, 05:46 PM
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Curious how you designed the bale chamber? Just reverse engineer an existing design with expired patents, or your own proprietary design? Lots of trial and error?

I really like the idea of the wide belts. Have never understood why multiple narrow belts became the standard on round balers. Is it tracking issues, or just the expense of replacing an entire wide belt if one gets damaged? I've always thought that a single continuous baler belt would be almost permanent.

Hay baling is one area of farming where no large progress has been made in recent decades, unlike the capacity of combines, spraying, seeding, even feeding. About time to take the next quantum leap. Actually going to this baler is a smaller jump than going from small squares to large rounds in the 70's, and I'm sure everyone said they were too big, no one would buy one, how would you feed or move, them or that they would run away down hill and destroy a village... But they seem to have caught on.
Was kind of wondering the same things.

Think the first round bales were like 4ft. Then got a lil taller n wider. Then stoped.. it wouldn't work for me but has to be a place for it. Probably not huge but some interest. If you didnt have to long hual I dont think it would be an issue getting them home to feed.

I was chatting with some guys about balers around xmas and how they aren't bigger but the speed of increased. Compared to 20 years ago you can make probably 3-4 times as many bales in the same amount of time with newer balers.

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post #22 of 23 (permalink) Old 02-21-2019, 07:50 PM
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Was kind of wondering the same things.

Think the first round bales were like 4ft. Then got a lil taller n wider. Then stoped.. it wouldn't work for me but has to be a place for it. Probably not huge but some interest. If you didnt have to long hual I dont think it would be an issue getting them home to feed.

I was chatting with some guys about balers around xmas and how they aren't bigger but the speed of increased. Compared to 20 years ago you can make probably 3-4 times as many bales in the same amount of time with newer balers.
Actually the first ones were even smaller and a lot earlier than you are thinking, patents go back to very early 1900s and the balers themselves in the '40s. Vermeer is considered the predecessor of the modern round baler and the first was of the 605 model, which was a five by six bale. Was around '72 or three they first built them. There was also a few earlier ones that rolled the hay on the ground, Hawkbuilt was one best known in this part of the world, had that raddle chain that was run hydraulically. I even have one sitting with trees growing thru it, had intended on using it for rolling up slough hay on really soft ground but just never did get into that soft and wet conditions thus far. Have one of those Roto ones too.
Link to the Allis history...
https://www.farmcollector.com/implem...er-round-bales



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post #23 of 23 (permalink) Old 02-21-2019, 09:38 PM
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Very flat and large fields here. Definitely would not want to be caught with one rolling in your direction. We realise that these won't fit many operations but have had more interest than we figured. The idea came just to serve our personal needs. The main push was aggravations with current Balers due to conditions we run in, downtime, missed knots, depreciation, and continued trades as machine prices increase every year. Our main goal is to produce a long life with high tonage production keeping cost per ton equal to or less than current methods.

I like this idea for the most part. Our grass meadows and wintering areas are all contiguous here with no public roads dissecting it. I use 4x4 x 8.5 squares now with an accumulator. Everything gets moved into position in rows with a stackmover and fed to beef cows with another modified stackmover in the winter. It’s sort of a bale grazing principal with more feed being set out every two to four days.

For most of my life we used a Hesston 60A stacker in a similar manner. When unloading for feeding in the winter I just drove forward faster than the unloading chains to stretch the stack to about double it’s length and half of its height. You had to load the stack from what was it’s rear end to accomplish this.

There is a little less waste with the large squares because they really only feed from the ends and can’t get on top of them so well. I’m not fond of dealing with routine twine and knotter issues though and do miss the care free days stacking.

I’ve thought of trying to build a giant round unit based on the old roller design because there is no shortage of used pipeline scrap around here, but it’s too big of a project for a one of a kind experiment.

If I had one of your balers I would get a stackmover that would load three bales end to end and place them near the yard in long rows at least three bales wide. If they would stay mostly together without twine I wouldn’t even use it. They would likely end up 7 feet high and 11 feet wide.

My only concern would be eye irritation in the cattle when there is hay above their heads. That will certainly occur feeding stacks left at full height such as with an electric wire. It would be interesting to see how a giant round bale would graze down.

As I recall our old Haybuster from the 1960’s made mighty nice round stacks for grazing that were 16 & 18 foot diameter with vertical walls that would stand up until the bitter end. Maybe that’s how these big bales should be set out, but I suspect that setting the field side down would be the better way.
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Last edited by Haystack; 02-21-2019 at 09:44 PM.
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