CX combines, differences, what to look for, wear points, upgrades etc. - The Combine Forum
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post #1 of 30 (permalink) Old 02-10-2019, 01:59 PM Thread Starter
jvw
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CX combines, differences, what to look for, wear points, upgrades etc.

Acting on the advice of fellow posters to upgrade combines after another harvest from h***, am looking at some CX machines. Probably CX8080, but from what I can tell, very few performance differences from an 860 to the 8080, is that accurate, what changes were made between models?

Any significant difference between an early 8080 and late 8080?

Going to look at an 8080 with 1800 separator hours, which probably has nearly as many engine hours as my youngest 8460 realistically. Owner thinks it is original stock cylinder and concave, probably even rub bars. So it will likely need some work, and in my own experience, an upgrade to Sunnybrook. Is that worthwhile to gain some momentum?

How easy is to to inspect the cylinder and concave from outside? Can you check the concave for bends through the rock trap without removing the feeder house?

What about the beater and rotary separator, do they contain consumable parts that need to be checked for wear?

I keep hearing about NH combines needing new sieves regularly, is that just a CR thing, or common to both, do they share many components( a lot more CR's in wrecking yards than CX's if needing parts in a hurry)? What about CIH combines, are they built on the same platform, or is the CX it's own animal all the way?

At what hours do straw walker crank bushings need attention?

Where does sheet metal wear out first?

What other weak points need checked that wouldn't be obvious.

Any options that are must haves, not real certain what was considered standard equipment by this era?

I did search through old posts, and had many other questions answered already.

I did work side by side in exceedingly wet canola(raining actually) with a CX840 this fall, and while mine wrapped the rear beater and eventually plugged solid, the CX never wrapped at all, but wasn't making any better time. My biggest hold ups this year, not counting where the header meets the dirt, were:
1) objects on top of the inadequate rock trap, or in cylinder.
2) wrapping the beater and or plugging cylinder in wet green long canola
3) and the inability to reverse the feeder house with the wimpy electric reverser.
A CX should solve those issues. An increase in capacity would be a bonus.


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post #2 of 30 (permalink) Old 02-10-2019, 02:20 PM
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From an engine standpoint, CX 860 has a 7.8 litre engine rated at 330 hp. CX 8080 has an 8.7 litre engine rated at 360 hp. CX 8070 has the same 8.7 litre engine rated at 322 hp, which can be tuned up to CX 8080 specs. I believe all threshing components are the same size.

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post #3 of 30 (permalink) Old 02-11-2019, 10:19 AM
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We been running the conventional NH combines on our farm since the early 90's starting with the TX 68 so I've pretty much seen these machines inside and out.

My opinion on the Sunnybrook is that unless your doing alot of cereals you don't really need them as you can very aggressively thresh with the stock cylinder.

You can very easily inspect the cylinder and concave through the rock trap. Behind the rock trap door is another smaller door that opens forward which exposes the concave and deck. If you open the cylinder all the way you can easily inspect the front concave. There are also access panels on both sides of the machine to inspect the concave.

Beater and rotary separator do have wear parts but you don't need to worry about them till at least 3000 separator hrs. Though that may depend on what kind of crops your predominately threshing.

I've never replaced a sieve on these machines.

I've never replaced the straw walker crank bushings but I have replaced plenty of straw walker bearings. Keep them greased. I have seen the walker crank actually split on 2 occasions that I suspect is due to 1 or 2 walkers plugging up really bad therefore putting uneven weight on the shaft. Keep an eye on the walkers. If they don't unplug over the course of a day or 2 you may want unplug them.

Sheet metal under the chopper definitely wears out first. The floor of the feeder house generally sees alot of wear. I highly recommend replacing the steel feeder house bars with the plastic coated ones, it will save some wear on the sheet metal and be a lot quieter.

In tough conditions the return grain pan will get plugged with crap and eventually screenings will start spilling over into the clean grain auger. This is something to check if you can't get a clean sample no matter how you set the machine.

On the grain return and the clean grain elevator there are little slip clutch packs made by Waltersheid DO NOT grease them regularly in season or else they will slip all the time and be useless. A quick shot of grease at the beginning of the season is all it needs.

If your looking to use large straight cut headers you won't be able to lift them with modifying the hydraulics a little.

Hope this helps
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post #4 of 30 (permalink) Old 02-12-2019, 10:01 AM
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Make sure chopper rotating knives are fairly square on the leading edge.
Chopper straw bridging is never fun.
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post #5 of 30 (permalink) Old 02-12-2019, 10:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Don Boles View Post
Make sure chopper rotating knives are fairly square on the leading edge.
Chopper straw bridging is never fun.
oh you go to experience that too?
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post #6 of 30 (permalink) Old 02-12-2019, 11:12 AM
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Biggest difference between an 860 and 8080 besides engine is the monitor in the cab.

If you need to replace your cylinder bars look around for a take out enclosed cast one somebody has removed to put in a sunnybrook. In your less then ideal conditions a sunnybrook might be worth it.

Inspection is pretty easy going through rock trap or there are a couple good sized doors you can take out on each side of the cylinder.

Sieves are a CR problem.

As for header lift there are two different options for lift rams.

Last edited by meskie; 02-12-2019 at 11:15 AM.
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post #7 of 30 (permalink) Old 02-12-2019, 12:24 PM
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oh you go to experience that too?
Sure did.
It was one of the reasons I started looking elsewhere back in 1999.
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post #8 of 30 (permalink) Old 02-12-2019, 12:42 PM
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Sure did.
It was one of the reasons I started looking elsewhere back in 1999.
CX didnít come out till 2001......
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post #9 of 30 (permalink) Old 02-12-2019, 12:46 PM
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cx didn’t come out till 2001......
tx 68
Same
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post #10 of 30 (permalink) Old 02-12-2019, 01:01 PM
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tx 68
Same
But different.....

From talking to guys that have run both the CX was better then a TX for chopper bridging.

Funny how you started looking for something different and the Claas isnít much better then a cx for having to keep knifes sharp.

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