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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys, I thought I'd come in and introduce myself a little bit by showing some pics of the kit we use on Silverton (the property seen in these pics). These Pictures are from Last Year's Sorghum Harvest. Some of them arn't great but, its worth a look ( I think so atleast lol)

This first Image is of the CTSII we use, It's seen sitting a day before it was sent out into the paddock. The Sorghum in the comb is from when we were doing Moisture tests.



This is a Shot from Inside the Cab while harvesting - The Paddock is the connoly paddock, that paddock is one to be careful in. Hidden dangers are everywere.




Coming in to unload



Snap, unloading!




Front on view



Turning back into the rows



Near the end of a row



Sunset Unloading



The T950 - Hard as nails rig.



Full Grain tank



Sunset Unloading from another angle


Photo Credz go to my cuz Jarrod!

I'll be heading back up there for the Wheat Harvest this year. so hopefully I can produce more pictures then!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes that is from a Property in Central Queensland in Terra Australis.

The Sorghum on Silverton (this property) is mainly sold to feed lots and cattle farmers. But some of it go to the Grain board wich disperse it from there.

Thanks for the comment!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm not really sure, all I know is that the main buyer of the stuff from the property is for animal feed.

I could find out what is used for if you want, I think its also in some foods, I'm not really sure, details are kinda sketchy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hmm, I dug around in Wikipedia for info about its uses.

This is what I got:

Numerous Sorghum species are used for food (as grain and in sorghum syrup or "sorghum molasses"), fodder, and the production of alcoholic beverages. Most species are drought tolerant and heat tolerant and are especially important in arid regions. They form an important component of pastures in many tropical regions. Sorghum species are an important food crop in Africa, Central America, and South Asia and is the "fifth most important cereal crop grown in the world" . African slaves introduced sorghum into the U.S. in the early 17th century.
 

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Quote:It's a starch based crop, like corn, it can be used in the ethanol biofuels industry, cattle feeds, you can actually pop milo like popcorn and it's pretty good....

Well that was definitly an interresting and usefull tip. Thanks alot!

Any preperations needed in order to make a bowl of "pop-milo"
 

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Quote:It's a starch based crop, like corn, it can be used in the ethanol biofuels industry, cattle feeds, you can actually pop milo like popcorn and it's pretty good....

Actually, while "popping sorghum" is edible and tasty, it is still quite just a novelty. However, while North America, much of Europe and Australia use the sorghum largely as stock feed, many people in Africa, and Indonesia value the grain sorghums as a chief food/cereal crop. It is just as much a staple there in those countries where it was originaly from and native to, in the first place.

Actually, except for high oil, grain sorghum has much the same biochemistry as corn does--and was proven by a farmer in Scott City, KS just how well it could finish hogs as any corn, thus he began what became a very large and lucrative business producing sorghum-fed hogs.


Brickwalker, those are fantastic photos of your header, too. I especially love the top one. Such a beautiful machine! Take good care of her!
 
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