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Discussion Starter #1
I'll be picking in a month and it looks like around 180bu+. I have large round concaves and key grates. In the past i left all the bars in, should i take every other one out or what should i do? Any suggestions is appreciated. THANKS
 

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Do you mean that you have the concaves with the 3/4" or so round bars or do you have the large wire concaves ? Both are available. I have the large wire concaves and beings I also harvest soybeans with this machine, I leave all my wires in. jeff
 

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We had a 1460 and ran large wire with all wires in 1st concave and every other wire out in 2nd and third concave. Worked well in corn and soybeans. With any more wires in we would have rotor loss even in soybeans with a 20 foot head. In corn we had to put vanes over rear grates in slow position also.

The 1460 is a great combine but does not have the concave rap or area of the 1660 and later machines so in high yielding crops it needs to be carefully set or you will have to much rotor loss.

The 2388 with round bar concaves is real easy to set and makes anyone an expert. The 1460 takes a real combine expert to get low rotor loss and a clean sample in the grain tank. Experiment and do a stall kill test to make sure you get it correct.

good luck
 

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Another tip is to make sure your rotor rasp bars are not wore out. The first 1460 we had was used and was hard to set until I put new bars in it.

Make sure you have weed knives on the rear of the rotor. The machine will take way less power in soybeans and you can go faster. We had a neighbor with a 1460 and he could not keep up with my dad on the other side of the fence until he put these on.

Also make sure the rotor belt tension is set by the book or the torque compensation pulley will not work correctly and you will pull the engine hard.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What do i look for in the stall kill test? And what are the weed knives? I have disrupters in the keystock grates. THANKS
 

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GPMC, what do you mean by the motor pulling hard if the torque pulley is not set right. I thought I understood how the torque pulley worked , but now I'm not so sure. Could you fill me in please. Jeff
 

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The weed knives or rear bars are bolted to the back end of rotor where the material exits. Looking at the case parts manual it is #183335C3 . On the 2388 they are improved and are called helical kicker bars. These bars help the crop residue to exit the rotor. Not all 1460 had them but they make a big performance difference.

The kill stall test should be described in the operator manual.
Look at what is in the augers under the concaves. Make sure it is not over or under thrashed. Check if there is grain in the grate section if so it is probably going out the rotor. Check if the concaves are plugging. Look at the distribution across the sieves it should not be concentrated to one side. If there is grain on the Rear third of the sieves it is probably going out the back when your running. Check your tailings elevator for quantity and type of material, Raw grain or to many pods is not good. Read your manual ...buy one if you don't have one. The manual has many suggestions on how to fix any of these problems. It will take experimenting and time in order to become an expert at setting a 1460.

We had disrupter's on a 1660 combine. Personally I do not care for them in corn or soybeans. One came off and put a hole in the side of the rotor cage. I think you can do as well by adjusting the vanes over the rotor.

We had a used and then got a new 1460. They are great combines but do take more skill and time to get them set perfect as compared to the new AFX rotor
 

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Reply to Jeff.

The belt and spring in the pulley should automatically respond to rotor loads and slow the rotor some but increase the torque input to the rotor. The engine will be buffered from these changes in the rotor load. If you do not grease your pulley bearings every day or let the rotor belt tension go way out of range then the torque multiply effect will not work correctly and the engine will need to develop more horsepower to hold speed.
This was noticeable on a 1460 where you do not have very much extra horsepower available. It was no fun going in and adjusting the belt tension but I was rewarded with better performance.

The new 300hp combines are not as sensitive to this because of extra available HP. I would think the belt still would last longer if kept adjusted.
 

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GPMC, thanks for the info. I just thought the purpose of the rotor pulley was to tighten up on the belt as the load increased. I had the honor of replacing the rotor belt last fall and I adjusted it back to where the book said to go. I will check it before I go to the field this fall. Also, I have to replace a little cast bracket that bolts on to the bottom of the rotor housing. It is the pivot for the High/Low lever and it broke off. Looks like I may have to loosen the rotor box and raise it up a little or rotate it around. It's just to close to the floor to take the old bracket out and bolt in the new one. If you have any more tips, I'd like to hear them. This is a good old machine that I have put 2366 vane transports and 2366 concaves in and it works well. I also built my own spiral feed rotor and put the st. john's welding cylinder bar kit on it. Feeder house will be the next item to rebuild. jeff
 

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Jeff, when you rebuild the feeder think about putting an electric reverser on it. I put an IH kit on our 1460 and that was one of the best improvements we ever made. Even though I was a young guy back then I got tired of using that huge wrench to unplug the head or feeder in soybeans.

Check the welds on the frame that hold the back Axel on. My dad was making a turn in the field and the Axel flew off. We had about 4000 hours on the second 1460 when cracks started appearing in the sheet metal around auger and other load bearings. So depending on your hours keep a look out for cracks.

That is about all the tips I have and you have a classic and great old combine that started the age of rotary combines.

However, don't try a newer 2388 or 2588 or you may be over come with an urge to spend some big money for one these new toys. The great design of the 1460 has been turned into a powerful and really amazing machine.
 
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