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I run a 2188 w/ 30ft. head in wheat. This past summer the wheat was 60-90 bpa and it seems to me that i didn't have enough capacity. It wanted to throw wheat out the back(sieve loss) with any speed over 2.5MPH. Is this normal? Hear and see guys put 36' on and going faster! I had front two concaves OEM small wire, third larger wire and key stock grates. 1 5/8 top sieve. Any suggestions or is that all i can expect? We do have a open slat sieve we use in beans and corn, can i use that in wheat? Mechanic says i won't be able to clean the wheat up good enough?
 

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I would run concave up fairly tight and set top front seive at 1/4 middle at 1/2 and rear at 1/2. Bottom seive about 1/4
LOts of wind 1000 or more and rotor depending on conditions probably in 950 range' Now these setting are what I use for durum which can be harder to thresh than some other wheat varieties.
 

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The 15/8in chaffer is pretty much for corn and beans only. To do a good job cleaning wheat you'll need the 11/8in sieve. The short toothed sieve works in corn and beans as well. We weren't terribly happy with our short toothed sieve, so we got an adjustable Peterson to use next year. I'm not exactly sure what it looks like since it's still at the dealer (maybe pick it up tomorrow). If I recall correctly, we used to use a non-adjustable Peterson chaffer in the old combines. Dad said they were good, but sometimes he wished he could close it down some; this new one will allow that. I guess I'll know how it works next June.

With our 2388 and 36' header I can't go any faster than 2.5mph in 80bu straw, but I feel like I'm just running out of horsepower trying to stuff so much material through the machine.
 

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Yeah you need the 1 1/8 sieve and i would run the concave as open as possible while getting all the white caps and heads thrashed. The idea is to not overthrash the straw an overload the sieve with foriegn material. if you do this you can open the sieve alittle, also crank up the air.
 

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A lot of people around here run 1 5/8 chaffer sieve for all crops unless you want to change sieves all the time. I don't like the job that a short finger sieve does in corn, beans is okay. I can't say for sure, but if you definitly do have sieve loss and you have the long finger chaffer, I would have to guess that you are over loading the cleaning system with mog. The drier the conditions, the more of a problem it can be. Merry Christmas to all !
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the info. Is my rotor setup allowing too much MOG on the sieves? I have it that way because we had a rotor loss problem and couldn't get the wheat separated out, so i put the keystocks in, but maybe it's too extreme?
 

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Do you have both sets of straight bars on rotor? That can chew straw up a fair bit especially when it gets dry. I normally only run the front set for small grains. You probably could run with out straight bars on if you keep the keystocks, but if you go back to smooth grates you will likely have rotor loss again. I would probably keep one set on. I always found that it was really difficult to get rotor loss down real low with out having the keystocks in. If you are not concerned about straw quality, then I would leave them in. I know everybody has a different idea or way to go about setting a combine but I normally run two small wire concaves and one large at the back and then I have a couple cover plates so I can put one or two on if it is hard threshing early in the season. I like to run the concaves pretty tight, and then adjust the rotor speed to suit. Try to run it as slow as possible and still do a decent job. This will cut down on rotor loss because the crop has more time to seperate out and also the slower you run the rotor, the less you will chew the straw up. A tighter concave setting and slower rotor speed does take more power though. A short finger 1 1/8 chaffer will do a better job in grain, but if you do keep the long finger 1 5/8 you should keep the front section pretty well closed and the middle and back sections about half inch. A couple posts above it is mentioned that you should run concave as open as possible while still doing a good job. This can help with the mog problem, but higher rotor speeds will berequired to do the same job, and that can lead to rotor loss. That is not to say that it won't be the answer for you. Conditions and location play a role too, so you will have to spend a little time to find the right setup for you. Good luck.
 
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