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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to case combines i upgraded from a 860 massey I plugged the rotor 3 times in one day. Was combining lentils feed some green oats in once then some weeds twice. Rotor speed was set at 310 rpm and every time I plugged it went right to zero and alarm came on. Did not stall engine and belt I think looks ok. It is a 1997 case 2188 any ideas thinking the old massey will be doing a lot of combining again I am tired of unplugging the case
 

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When I do lentils I'm running 450 rpm. Make sure rotor belt is adjusted properly. This is in manual. Make sure all belt tighteners springs are adjusted up to pipes. Which rotor do you have? I was plugging the afx rotor in my 2388 on peas last year a lot. I put on a set of Kile KXF impellers and rotor transition bars. I can still plug in tough conditions but it is harder to plug and I don't plug as bad as last year. If you have a specialty rotor a Kile KRF kit will help or axceller kit. Read articles on Harvest Services website on how the IH rotaries work.
 

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Im not familiar with lentils either . Rotor speed seems low. If the rotor speed is dropping to 0 that easy without dragging down or killing engine sounds like a belt problem. I have had tensioner pulleys break. Rotor still worked but would not take load. The adjustment rod can wear where it slides through the little rocker and get stuck so it will not tension properly. The rotor pulleys may not be adjusted properly or the that is like a snowmobile belt could be worn enough so its not holding. Book gives measurements for these adjustments. I can adjust rotor speed to low on my 2388 and make it slip because the driven pulley can not self adjust far enough. If belt looks ok I think increasing rotor speed will probably fix it.
 

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I have been running same combine, any time I have plugged rotor it will drop RPMs, but not immediately, and it will also kill engine. It's a belt issue for sure.

Also, I find rotor at 410-450 works best on lentils(unless really dry) open up concaves and you will be fine.
 

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Crank the rotor up to 400-500rpm, if it still plugs without killing the motor your belt is not set correct, or it is screwed. Most of the time if you have to reset your belt it is stretched and screwed. When you change it change spring in the pulley it's $75 makes a big diff get the stiffest one.
 

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It might not be a belt issue but it sounds more like the PTO clutch is gone out . This is the hydraulic clutch that engages the rotor drive belts and the rest of the combine . it is right under the triple pulley at the back of the motor . If the combine starts up nice and slow and easy then it's probably the pto clutch as when you normally engage the combine it will go in with a bang or a good grunt .
 

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I would also be suspect of the rotor belt. Make sure the variable sheave on the right side is set very true to the torque sensing sheave. Also get the updated spring for the torque sensing pulley and the tool to put it in, about $40 for each of those items. Does your fan speed drop also or just your rotor? If it's just rotor then your variable speed belt is slipping. If you fan drops also, them it could be separator drive belt or pto. I would also recommend a Kile kit if it has a standard or specialty rotor, makes a huge difference.
 

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I dont blame you. The red rotor is a real sob to unplug.

If the rotor gear box is in low gear, 370 rotor speed is fine if that is working for your varieties of lentils. The engine should definitely bog hard, and the rotor should really make some bumping and thumping noises before it stops.

If it does not, then yes, definitely some drive issues. It can also be the tri rib belt that comes from the pto pulley to the main drive jack shaft. The belt will look to be in perfect condition, but the ribs will wear and the belt will sit on the outside band on top of the pulley.

When you engage the separator it should only take about 1 second and then the separator should really clunk into gear. It should not just slowly or gradually slip into gear, but rather abruptly engage. If not, you may have a clutch issue. This can be tested easily with a low volume flow meter and a low pressure gauge setup. There is an accumulator on that engage system that must also be in good working order. It takes I think about 100psi nitrogen and can be filled at your local hydraulic store or any brand dealer.

But for sure the rotor box must be in low gear. I think the 2188 has a 3 speed box does it not? I dont know as I only run old junker 1680s. But if it is in low speed your rotor speed is fine if it is working for you. The rotor must make some bad noises before it plugs or you have drive issues. Also, if you are direct cutting, (I dont know how your area harvests lentils) make sure your header to feeder adjustments are proper and that the feeder chain is adjusted right up front at the drum. These adjustments for direct cutting will keep the material flowing properly intot he feeder. If they are not adjusted proper, you will get bunch feeding and that can rope up quickly at the transition cone and plug the rotor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the great ideas. It rain over a inch so will have time to check it all over now. I am straight cutting with a 1020 and 2188 only has a 2 speed gear case. I do not think the fan was slowing down before rotor alarm came on each time.
 

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Ok, if nothing else slowed much, then as said by previous members, it is likely the rotor drive. At very slow rotor speeds, the driven sheaves are close together and proper belt tension, which uses a special method of tensioning, is required. With the variable speed sheave system, you cant just pull it tight like a regular belt. The torque sensor hub must also be in good order and properly lubricated so it can react to torque input and keep the belt tight under load.

On the drive sheaves, there are 3 pins that keep the sheaves driving together and in proper alignment. Those pins set in a bushing. Those bushings will wear out and allow the sheaves to wobble and not grip the belt proper.
 

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you do have a better bite on the belt in the higher speeds on the variable
in high or low. but that is probably not it.

the machine drive belt tightener, can wear the rod , and then it gets stuck
happened on 2388, as belt wears , pipe and spring look tight ,
but does not actually tighten the belt.
easy to take apart and inspect.

torque sensor check belt tension, check for free movement of torque sensor.
step on belt to spread TS pulleys. then start and run to watch if they snap back.
check ramps for worn spots , and bearings for flat spots.

as a long shot what is your concave set at
never wider than 4.

as for afs ans kile fronts , that is not your problem.
i have one with one without , performance diffs are not great
 

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I beg to differ on the KXF front last year I would have one little wad that would come and plug the rotor . This year with KXF I have smoother more even feeding and don't have a nasty tight wad. An Axceller kit or KRF would be great for him if he has elephant ears. Rubbing all that material onto an expensive rotor cone seems foolish to me. With short days now any extra capacity is well worth it. There a few other things that could explain differences in capacity not just impellers.

I'm going to check my torque sensing spring in the off season. Thanks for bringing that up. Staggered rock trap beater will go in before next year too.
 

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Just a shot in the dark - we had a 1460 do the same thing. The rotor belt runs from the rotor to the other set of sheaves - that set of sheaves is on a splined shaft. The splines had rounded out and would not catch properly.

When the rotor was empty, everything would work fine. As soon as anything green went through, the rotor would slug without any warning.
 

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Just a heads up, the factory manual calls for molybdenum free grease for the torque sensing hub. Supposedly the moly will seperate from centrifical action and collect in the hub blocking flow which would stop the belt from tensioning as load increases. Might be BS to sell case ih grease or maybe not?
 

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Just a heads up, the factory manual calls for molybdenum free grease for the torque sensing hub. Supposedly the moly will seperate from centrifical action and collect in the hub blocking flow which would stop the belt from tensioning as load increases. Might be BS to sell case ih grease or maybe not?
Looked today and our 1460 manual says to use some IH # 251 or something grease or equivalent #2 Lithium based grease. Looked like that was the only fitting that had a grease recommendation by it. Didn't forbid moly grease but how common was moly grease in 1981? I'll have to look at our grease now but its probably had about 3-4 kinds since it came onto the farm 10 years ago with no problems so far.
 

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I recommend the Case grease. Additives in others can cause the hub to bind. Grease daily. When you warm up in the morning run your rotor speed all the way up and all the way down. This distributes thelube on the collor and knocks the dust out of things. I have had to do this miday on dusty peas because the dust builds up so bad it makes the pulleys slick and piles up inside. I have had issue running at the slowest rpm as well just due to the drive pulley isnrunning on the smallest area and doesnt have enogh bite, and the belt in th driven isnt running deep enough to dig in and make the torque hub bit. Try 450rpm. Good luck.
 
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