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Titan equipment as a 2000 2388 with 5800hrs on it. I just can't recall seeing that new of a combine with that many hours on it. In case you were interested they want $60-something for it.
 

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I am sure that it is a custom harvester machine, and if it were used alot, then it would have that many hours on it. That machine is now 6 years old and that's averaging a little less than 1000 hrs a year. For a custom harvester, that would not be totally out of proportion, especially if it were cutting multiple crops per year.

On the other hand, I would probably stay away from a combine that has that many hours on it. I imagine that it would be pretty rough and wore out! That's a lot of hours!
 

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Quote:

On the other hand, I would probably stay away from a combine that has that many hours on it. I imagine that it would be pretty rough and wore out! That's a lot of hours!


Rother, I understand what you are saying, but also do understand that hours are still only a relative issue. I have seen Axial-Flows in very good condition with over 7-8K hours, but their great shape was the result of careful overhauling/rebuilding season to season. Yes, these were custom combines.

While it is true low hours do help sell a lot of combines, I do tend to resent the big focus on the fact this or that machine was a FARMER-owned combine as opposed to a custom harvester. personally, I would prefer a CH-owned combine, just knowing how most combiners do take optimum care of their machines. Too bad many, many farmers I know personally, don't take any better care of their combines [including lack of knowledge to even correctly adjust them] than their gravel roads!


No, I'm saying this to offend any farmers here, but I do see more of this coming from farmers, than I do CH's. In fact, just the presence of a farmer right here on a combine forum tells me much about his/her genuine concern for combines and IMPROVING their ability to handle them, set them and such.

I would almost bet big bucks that in order for this A-F to have sustained some 5,800 hours and still run good enough to sell again for farming and not a salvage yard, it was one well-cared-for combine! It just seems logical, having not actually SEEN the said machine.
 

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I do agree with these comments. However, in my area and knowing our customers, this is not the case. On average, the farmer who owns a machine this recent, is usually concerned about productivity and efficiency. Therefore, they usually bring them in to the shop for maintenance every winter. So, I would be much more inclined to buy a farmer owned machine as to a CH's machine. The CH machines that I have had experience with are usually not very 'slick' so-to-speak. I am not saying that all of them are like this, but this is just my personal experience.
 

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Alot of it would also depend on what crops it's been used on. that many hours in wheat is alot different than rice or even high yielding corn.
 

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Quote:Alot of it would also depend on what crops it's been used on. that many hours in wheat is alot different than rice or even high yielding corn.


Very true! A machine that's been up North cutting corn with 1000 hrs on it is like a machine that's been cutting nothing but wheat with 2000. Just estimates for illustration, but it makes a huge difference.
 

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Yes on the crop differences! Again, I am not saying all farmers are poor combine owners, but overall, it seems more combiners are apt to take utmost care of their machines, as their very livelihood depends on them. In this era of low profit margins and ROI, the old fly-by-night kind of CH is long gone. This is certainly no longer a quick way to a fast buck!

Here in Oklahoma, I'm very glad to just know there are some farmers who will take in their combines to real shops for proper care and repair if they just are not able to do so themselves. It's too bad that my husband's and my own experience over the past 15 years involved 4 farmers who could not even properly set their own combines, let alone know just what it took to keep them running at their best. Two such combines are now no longer with us because of neglect in key areas.


I also know that if a combiner does not keep up his combines, he will soon find himself stuck in the trailer park with his fleet while all the others are in the fields!
 
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