The Combine Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,210 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm hoping to pick up some tips and tricks from you guys. I'll be cutting my first crop of wheat in a few weeks. I have a 4420 with 13 foot head. The 4420 has about 2300 engine hours on it, no hour meter for separator. Most of the hours by far are corn, so it has some wear. Will be cutting white winter wheat, bearded. Right now the wheat looks awesome, should be around 60 - 80 bushel, lots of straw if I cut it low. . .

Though suggestions on new parts and kits and so on will be appreciated, none of that will be happening this year as no money to put into machine, and not enough acres to justify much investment anyway. So, try to help with settings, things to look for, the best I can expect and so on. TIA gang
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
This will be your first time running the 4420 or just the first time doing wheat with it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
the 13 foot header is a little small for wheat on that size of machine, so don't be afraid to have some pretty good ground speed to keep the machine full and minimize walker loss. if it has a chopper make sure the knife is in the "in" posistion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
Last year was my first time running wheat with my 6620 T2. I made my settings the way the manual said except I went to the extreme. I mean concave set to the tight end of the range given in the book. Cylinder speed to the fast side of the range,,,, you get the idea. I run a 920 head, so I agree with the above poster that you'll need to push it a lil bit with a 13 foot head. FYI-- I was running 3.0- 3.2 mph in 60 bushel wheat, cutting it low. Hope this helps.

I forgot to say, get out and check the ground behind the machine again and again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,210 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
@phishstik, I'v run the machine a little in corn, a little in oats, and also some soybeans. (very little in oats) Last year, my dad ran it in oats, and judging by the way the deer tore into the round bales of straw, I'm thinking some grain was left in the heads or at least carried out the walkers. I was not in the field at all when those oats were taken off.

Just a question, how exactly does keeping the machine full minimize walker loss? Another dumb question, what are "white caps" I always read about on here?

The combine has filler plates in the cylinder. I didn't know squat about that kind of thing when I bought it . . . now I know slightly more than squat. The previous owner was a dairy farmer, and given the fact he had Harvestore Silos on the premises I'm assuming he used it for some high moisture corn? And the filler plates help with that? Should I take them out? Is it difficult to take them out? Can I leave them out for "dry" corn (around <= 22%)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
4420 book says leave the filler plates in the cylinder once you install them for corn. In corn they keep ears from moving through the cylinder and bypassing the concave. Doesn't matter high moisture or dry, you need them for corn.

We just recently sold our 4420. Last year, my uncle was certain that us having had the filler plates in ours for many years was the/one reson we couldn't get it to really eat up the oats! I'm not sure, but book says you can leave them in. Our problems might have had a lot to do with many things including generally tough/high moisture straw. I believe you are in a moist climate too, we had good weather this year, but sometimes not. The humidity does make for late starts and an early finish to the day for us.

If you want to, it's not too bad getting them out, just lower the header, raise the catwalk in front of the engine and get in there through the top cylinder door and unbolt them.

One problem area on ours was always the cylinder speed bicycle chains coming off. If your cylinder tach works, keep an eye on it so you don't get plugged if it slows down in small grains or you begin grinding in corn when it speeds up on you. It can also just get out of time and slacken the belt if the lower chain comes off!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
tbone, keeping the "machine full" just means there's enough material grinding around in the concave to properly knock those seeds off. Admittedly its hard to judge just what that is on smaller combines like this but you will get a feel for it.

As markat already said, you'll need to get that concave down close and cylinder speed up. I haven't done wheat, but for barley I find my settings are more extreme than the book recommends. I think the fan speed could be a big help, although since theres no tach on it its a b***h to get perfect too!!

You've got me wondering if mine has filler plates in it now..............
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
yank those filler plates!!!!!! you will have a lot less vibration and a bunch more power. if you have the cylinder set to 900 or so you could get a heck of a shake if dust settles in the wrong spot. unless your corn is real wet you don't need them. we had a 95 and left the plates in for wheat once. it shook a lot until one slipped and then it really shook. i took them out in my 7720 t2 and could not believe how much more power i had. can average about 4.5 in 90 bu wheat wit a 920 header. before i did that 4 was about it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,952 Posts
If you have an engine tach, keeping it "full" means dropping about 50 RPM from no-load full engine speed. You'll be able to get more out of it, but that's a start...

Whitecaps are when you break the kernels, and you see the "white" flour inside of the wheat. Cracked kernels are dockage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,210 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the input so far guys. I too "assumed" white caps had something to do with hulls, but it was only a guess. So, what can you do about that if it happens?

I've also always generally understood a full combine worked the best, but this is the first time I've heard anybody put a number on it (drop 50 rpm from no load, thanks Chris, at least its a start like you said). What I didn't get was relating it to "walker loss". But I think I get it. What you're saying is if the combine isn't full, it won't be adequately thrashed, and the grain will stay in the head on the way out the walkers, not blown over the back of the chaffer. . .

Always some disagreement on filler plates, and here again I see. But, sounds like I'm on the right track with my reasoning about the guy and his high moisture corn for dairy. . .I never plan on combining wet corn, at least not that wet!

I just hope after last nights storm, I have something left standing to combine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,210 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Well, I took the filler plates out last night. Um, to the guy who said "not too bad. . ." whew dude, you're a glutton for punishment. I suppose I've done worse jobs, but that was pretty rough I thought.

Let's hope that was worth it and works well enough for corn. I guess putting them back in wouldn't be as bad as taking them out. Let's also hope the crop is good, some problems around. . .

I'll try to get pictures of this up someday. .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,210 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Doing wheat around here is next to impossible this year. We're picking at it between showers, high humidity, cloudy days. . .And most people's quality is in the crapper, and even if not, the elevator that was buying white wheat last year is not this year even if it is good. Our sample has not been tested yet, but guys are having trouble with sprouting given all the showers and humidity. We have only seen a couple sprouts, but there's a nasty rain on the way is as we speak. Tried to take some off yesterday, moisture was 18.5, will be drying that load but quit combining. Picked a great freakin' year to try wheat
Yeah, I don't know whether to be mad or just cry


As for the combine, she's working ok. Interesting, I can't really seem to fill the combine to create a little load on the engine without overcoming the header feed rate. Just as I start to get a slight pull on the engine, the wheat is building up in the center of the header, and if I let that slug go through, it will clog. Found that out the hard way after about 1/4 of a grain tank!

Looks like we're going to lose our butt on wheat this year. Preliminary estimates look like we grew 80 - 90 bu . . .of garbage that nobody wants. Great. And that probably means it will be my last crop of wheat for a good many years. Man I'm disappointed, my heart was soooo in to this, and you get kicked in the teeth for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
tbone, I'm having some of the same feed-in problems as you are. I believe it's weather related. I finished today with a 15+ mph wind blowing. It fed in better today than at any time all season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
It should be worth something for feed at least. Lots of things can eat some amount in place of corn. Of course that would mean it would sell for about the same as corn............... ouch!

One thing to check on the header feeding, Do you have the front drum on the feeder house adjusted properly as well as set in the lower (grain) position? All the fingers in the auger present and working? Header drive chain on the larger sprocket (left side of feeder house) and feeder house drive chain on the larger sprocket over on the right side?

Check that the main separator clutch lever (tightens 2 belts under the seat) takes a good hard push to snap it in. Also check the tension on both the belt on the cylinder variable speed pulleys and those on the 3 groove sheave behind it. These both should have a gauge tab to tell you how far to tighten the nuts on the adjuster.

Looks like we are going to dry out some this week. We went from too dry to wet from last week to this. Hit us about right, lots of corn filling the ears right now. Hope you get some fair weather too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
Fellow 4420 pilots, I need some info on your feeder house belts. I had a hard time at JD dealer today figuring out WTF I needed. Its the set of 3 smaller belts at the bottom of left side feeder house.
I realize some feeder houses on 4420's are chains on both sides instead of belts on left though.

My 3 original belts began with part # "H77" on them. JD is telling me they don't have that number in the part system at all, and gave me one set too small, now another one coming tomorrow that will apparently be 1" longer than the H77 but "should work anyways". New ones start with "AH" serial.

WHAT THE HECK belts do you guys have on yours?
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top