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Does anyone have experience with our problem. Case 4690 brakes are basically non existent rolling forward. Pedal feels normal but does nothing to stop forward motion. Rolling in reverse and touching the brakes is extreme, stop on a dime, braking power.

We have a service manual, just haven't sat down to start looking through it. Are the brakes hydraulic - just activated by the pedal?
 

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Brakes are a central unit on the back of the transmission case and are actuated by a hydraulic setup like a car with a slave cylinder moving an arm. The brakes themselves work with roller balls moving the plates out when the pedal is depressed.


You need to get under safely and have someone press the pedal and see what the slave cylinder is doing . There is an adjustment there and your handbrake operates on the same linkage so follow it down . Its on the right under the cab looking forward.
 

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There is no caliper . As I said above it operates on plates and a moving set of balls. It is all sealed inside a housing and works before the main drive shaft takeoff to the rear wheels.

Jodman, would you look in your manual for a circuit diagram for the 3PL hydraulic motor thanks . Perhaps an exploded view?
 

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there is a arm on top on top of the unit called a caliper arm. It has the piston attached to it they seize and the piston won't have enough force to move it. It a common thing
 

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I think you know what you mean but let me explain it again. The brake master cylinder attached to the foot pedal pushes fluid to a slave cylinder attached to a lever . The lever moves the balls out and the balls move the brake disks against a flywheel type plate attached to the transmission.


Brake cylinder and slave both have pistons in them which can sieze.

A caliper is what is used on disk brakes and there is no caliper in this system.
I think you simply have the terminology confused.
 
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