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Sounds like you are having a real fight to get this crop off. Lots of good suggestions here to try and sounds like you have tried lots on your own. Hats off to you for what you have learned in your first year! There were major changes made in the area of the impeller to rotor transition between the 400 to 500 series. Some of that has been modified on later 500 and 700 series. I wonder if some of your backfeeding starts with wet green straw not being stripped off the cylinder? That whole area was a problem with dividing the crop and getting it to flow into the rotors. Or not. It makes sense that if the flow is not getting away into the rotors it backs up and causes backfeeding around the impeller, which can continue forward over top of the cylinder and on over top of the APS which then creates a big wad in the area between the feeder chain and the APS. The feeder chain runs out of space to dump swath and stops. This all relates back to solutions that SouthernSK, Seedcleaner, Sunnybrook etc. have worked on over the years in trying to divide the flow of material, specially when it is wet, long, tough. Since you are new to Lexion I mention this from the last decade the evolution of making this problem better. Since your machine is a 2005 IIRC it might not have any of these things done. A list of some of the things tried to rectify this problem are duck feet in the rotor, Sunnybrook segemented cylinder, sharpened knife on the dogs tongue to split this wet tough straw, notch in the impeller to receive dogs tongue to make a positive shear point, moving elephant ears on rotors as far forward as possible to grab straw, in later years Sunnybrook impeller, Lexion green straw kit. This is just a partial list of things that comes to mind. Early on some tried installing all the rub bars in the center to throw out. Not really successful. In 2004 on my 480 I worked with a concept of toothed impeller wear bars that ran at zero clearance to strip the straw off the cylinder and leave 3/8" of clearance between the teeth so the impeller did not slug when turning opposite rotation to the cylinder. Lots of ideas tried and after 14 years since the 500's came out it is better now. You ask the question where is the backfeeding starting. It could be in this area. The 480 had a post hanging down from the top of the rotor cage to support the front bearing so the opening to the rotors was almost 360 degrees. The 500's closed up the top, almost half of the intake. Never liked or understood the reasons given for that. Not trying to overwhelm you with complex solutions but to let you know there are fixes if this is the source of your problem.
 

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I think you need to start at the back of this machine and work forward.
Verify straw chopper there and working.
Verify two rotors are there and turning.
Verify impeller is installed and no buildup in the middle of it in front of rotors (via grain tank doors)
Verify concave is installed and level-ish. Not broken or hanging from one corner, etc...
Verify feeder floor is shiny, as seen from the upper end. (remove fold out door under cab and inspect, after emptying rock trap)
 

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I had a very similar problem with one of my machines this past season. Back feeding and plugging the feederhouse like crazy. I had a broken stopper on the top of the front drum of the feeder house on one side. It’s a little Metal tab that has a rubber piece on it and it was bent bad on one side and it was causing the front drum to ride wierd and plug up. I think it got bent reversing st one point. I spent two days chasing it from the front of the machine to the back. I would recommend opening the door under the cab and have someone run the machine and watch to make sure that it is not throwing material back from the impeller and causing the issue in the feeder. That way you know it’s the feeder for sure. Also would change the slip cluch at this point I’m sure it’s been plugged to the point that it will slip earlier. It’s not hard to do. Like a 30 min job max.
 

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Pretty sure it's coming from the front end not the back.

Was that header on a wide body machine? Just wondering are there stripper or auger extensions or anything like that when you put a narrow body on the same header?

We've only ever had wide body's and only had a narrow body for a short stint and promptly traded to another wide body.

Is there adjustment to lower the auger and try to limit what can get under it?
 

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I know on the pickup heads there is a exta section of flighting that you can bolt. It’s about a foot long or so. I run wide bodys.
 

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Discussion Starter #47 (Edited)
Have been dealing with picking crop out of the dirt for so many years and know all the symptoms of dirt build up and places to look. Nothing at all right now. I clean the rock trap constantly since there are pieces of sod and small roots getting in there, but it doesn't change anything.

The auger header is feeding terribly in certain conditions. Often one direction is a nightmare, the other in the exact same place is a breeze.

After it got tough last night and was virtually impossible to move without plugging, we removed all table auger fingers from the areas with flighting. Helped a lot with reducing feeding up the back of the auger. Had already tried setting them more or less aggressive.

Apparently the auger is already as low as it can go without a lot of effort, since the fingers hit the floor if I set them to the most aggressive setting.

The stripper plates do extend beyond the opening about 6".

No bolt on auger extensions, but there is holes for them. flighting goes well past the opening already.

I slowed down the table auger by swapping sprockets doesn't throw material up the back as badly.

Slip clutch for header ( doesn't have one on auger, just driveline, poppet type as well, and adjustable), was stuck, I proved that by twisting off the shaft at the end of the table auger last evening. Got that set up so it slips about right, an improvement, and much easier to unplug when it stops before making it worse. Rotated the dogs since the leading edge was worn almost square, backed off the spring tension.

Reel is already as agressive as possible, gets worse if I angle the teeth forward. Will try drilling more holes to see if I can use the reel teeth to stand the material in front of the auger instead of under it.

At one point I ended up with rotors turning slower than cylinder while trying different combinations. That made the bad noises and plugging much much worse. Keeping rotors 200 rpm ( maxed out) above cylinder is helping. So some of the issue was further back.

I will go and check the upper stoppers.

I ran the 8460 for a hopper full last night after the crew went home since it was so tough, terribly wet straw, middle of the night, table auger and strippers in awful condition( picked up a fence post 2 days ago, bent auger, broken fingers, damaged, bent, rough flighting, damged stippers from before). It feeds absolutely awful in one direction, giant piles coming up behind auger, going over reel, all feeding at once, and nearly stalling the engine, but never plugged, and didn't even slow me down. The F540 plugs the feeder house on piles a fraction that size.

I changed the header pitch to tilt it up more, somewhat closing the gap between auger and chain, possibly improved. It did help with the contour a lot though, now I can set it through much more of a range ( was almost at the limit for the wands to reach), and gouges in the dirt less, apparently the angle of approach of the skid shoes is better.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
Wasn't the torque to slip the feeder clutch supposed to be 600 ft lbs at one time?
I haven't tried to measure it. But when it plugs, it is plugged good. requires lots of rocking back and forth, sometimes disconnect header driveline. Probably every 4th time it requires removing the header, and still a struggle.

Chain is really tight, would less tension allow more room for slugs, or it doesn't matter since it all has to compress through the top anyways?
 

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I’m convinced it’s nothing more than a header issue. If you can go one direction and it’s a breeze and go the other and it’s wadding it up and flipping it over the reel that’s never going go through the combine very well.

I’m positive a Macdon Draper would put an end to the agony.
 

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Wasn't the torque to slip the feeder clutch supposed to be 600 ft lbs at one time?
I haven't tried to measure it. But when it plugs, it is plugged good. requires lots of rocking back and forth, sometimes disconnect header driveline. Probably every 4th time it requires removing the header, and still a struggle.

Chain is really tight, would less tension allow more room for slugs, or it doesn't matter since it all has to compress through the top anyways?
I would guess that's your problem right there. It's not grabbing crop soon enough being really tight and therefore has to have a pile a crop for it to grab on to in the first place and then at that point will plug easier with no flex in your chain.

Loosen it up

Mine is pretty loose to where I asked the tech when he was out for something else if this is way too loose and what I should tighten it too. He said it's good leave it.
 

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I didn't read the whole thread but I had some 5ft rye that would wrap on the auger of our 535 due to needing new stripper bars and I plugged the feeder house several times.. started watching for clumps going in and realized it was actually coming back down on the top side. I knew I needed new aps caps so I put new ones in and problem went away.
 

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The third slat from the front should just touch the feederhouse floor. Than you should be alright, everything else is too hard on the chains and bearings. Good luck!
 

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We set ours so we can just get our fingertips under the lowest slat and you have to press down a little to touch the floor.

I’ve never noticed any perceivable difference in feeding between a loose chain and a tight one.

I don’t know if Sunnybrook is behind on the APS caps but we stock a set here I could ship out in a hurry. We honestly didn’t see much difference if any between machines that had them and not.
 

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We set ours so we can just get our fingertips under the lowest slat and you have to press down a little to touch the floor.

I’ve never noticed any perceivable difference in feeding between a loose chain and a tight one.

I don’t know if Sunnybrook is behind on the APS caps but we stock a set here I could ship out in a hurry. We honestly didn’t see much difference if any between machines that had them and not.
Maybe a tight chain would be fine in my mind a tight one isn't going to grab material as soon and you'll have to have more for it to grab in the first place. Like stated above, mine touches the floor third one back first being straight forward in the middle of the drum

I don't have the Sunny Brook caps just worn ones to new ones the difference was incredible
 

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Well 1/2” off the floor isn’t tight and does not change the geometry of the front drum at all. A loose chain will let the feeder house plug way easier than one property tensioned.
 

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Pros and cons to both looser and tighter. Furthermore, does no good to compare if you don't specify if the drum is in the raised or lowered position.

I made my own upper and lower drum blocks out of polyurethane. It is closer to the raised position than lowered, and I leave it there for wheat, soybeans and corn.
 

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Joe, can you go into more detail or have a picture of this?

"The chopper idler in between second and third stage has stoppers that need to be bolted tight after its tensioned so they can’t whip."
 
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