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So on the chopper drive there is the double idler between the second stage chopper belt and the third stage belt that goes to the chopper itself.

There’s the regular tensioning spring and tension indicators. Once that is setup to the proper tension there are ears that stick out on each pivot shaft that have adjustable stoppers that more or less fix the position of the idler. When you have those setup you can pull on the belt and it won’t compress the spring.

Once those stoppers are adjusted put another bolt through with washers behind it in the slot because they like to slide back just about no matter how hard you tighten it.
 

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Discussion Starter #63
I agree with the assessment that a draper header would likely make most of the problems go away, and in my disasterous 2018 harvest thread, many here recommended that as a solution. Last year my limitation was never auger header feeding, but where the header meets the ground. This header has solved that completely, but now won't feed, which wasn't the problem with the 8460 auger headers. And this year side by side, the 8460 never plugs the feeder house, even in ridiculously tough conditions.

Finally had some good harvest conditions yesterday. switched to canola in the middle of the night after giving up on barley ( grain was dry, first time all year, straw was green and tough, and air got very humid). Very heavy, and very green stemmed Canola went through decently, but slowly, plugged regularly all night and even worse early morning, till the wind came up, then it was a monster. I could easily do over 1000 Bu per hour, and even sustain over 1500 Bu/h in really high yielding areas without plugging at all. Till it rained of course...

While waiting on weather, I will replace the worn out Caps with the ZAPS. Changing both feeder house bearings, one is warm, the other is borderline hot, and see what else I can find i there. At one point when moving fields(coming from wheat), I checked the drum stops, and one was against the bottom stop, and free, one was against the top. couldn't pry it down. Lots of material jammed along the edges of the feeder house. Went combining anyways since it was about to get too tough, and next time I checked it was down again. I think the full side covers are in order.

I also think some proper harvesting conditions are also in order. Hot, dry, sunny, ripe crops. Hard to believe straw can be this obviously green at the end of October after all the freezing conditions. Could likely still silage the straw it has so much moisture and sap. Glad I didn't apply fungicide.
 

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Discussion Starter #64
Can you post pics of the crop and header, etc?
The best I can do today is post a picture of snow...

Wheat ranges from completely flat, but aiming in all directions except straight west, to mostly flat with random stooks still sticking up, to all drooped over, but not quite on the ground. Straw looks ripe in some places, some places ( the worst for combining, obviously) it still looks green then the straw is green almost everywhere. Very high yield, as in you wouldn't believe me if I posted it.
 

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Discussion Starter #66 (Edited)
If you can’t beat 8 t/ha wheat I will not be impressed, lol.
Well, first I had to do some math to convert to your archaic system of measurement...

The only places yielding that low are where it was badly frozen and am blowing the lighter seeds out the back.
 

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What are you referring to as "both feederhouse bearings"? The rear hex shaft utilizes three bearings fyi. I don't think they are a common failure though.
 

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So on the chopper drive there is the double idler between the second stage chopper belt and the third stage belt that goes to the chopper itself.

There’s the regular tensioning spring and tension indicators. Once that is setup to the proper tension there are ears that stick out on each pivot shaft that have adjustable stoppers that more or less fix the position of the idler. When you have those setup you can pull on the belt and it won’t compress the spring.

Once those stoppers are adjusted put another bolt through with washers behind it in the slot because they like to slide back just about no matter how hard you tighten it.
Is this why that bar keeps cracking on me?!
 

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Discussion Starter #69
Update. Harvest seems to be over for a while at least.

I changed the caps to ZAPS, but never got a chance to try them out. Certainly looks much more aggressive, old ones wore fast, were just flush with the mounts at the beginning of the season, well below the mounts already, and it was been a very brief season. Really thinking that is going to help though. Could often hear something grumbling before the feeder house plugged, so having the APS more aggressively pulling material out can only help. Changing them isn't quite as much fun as it sounds, especially in the snow and cold and dark.

I did pull the cover on the APS and looked for cracks, is it the inside weld, or outside, there are two incomplete circular welds on the right end, one to the shaft, one to the hub? Either way, both look fine.

Changed both bearings in the feeder house lower drum. Turns out the bearings were like new, but someone had installed them on worn out shafts. Built them up and cut snap ring grooves in, plus new bearings. In the process I discovered that one of the tensioner springs had a coil broken off at the end, so wasn't getting even tension. I replaced both with pipe sleeves as suggested. Ran fine for the next day, but when I tried extremely tough canola( in between rains, in a last desperate attempt before a foot of snow fell), it plugged/backfed, and broke one of the threaded rods in the adjuster. So I built some slotted spacers and now have the adjusters tightened down in the slot, as well as the solid pipes. Haven't been able to try since.

Rarely plugged in canola, except when it was extremely tough at night( or in the rain), and green plants.

At least by spring, the straw should be cured/rotten and should solve the plugging problem, and exchange it for a whole bunch more...
 

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I would recommend loctite on those zaps, at least if some of them are bolted to lugs that have been bent and are slightly out of shape.

Joe, I have cracked the stage two belt stabilizer bar a few times. I wonder if this is because I never had that adjusted bolt tight? Also, stage three has a slot for a bolt but no bolt there. Should I put one there and if so, that would prevent me from going from low to high correct?

Sorry for the thread derailment.
 

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I can’t say for sure if that’s going to stop the cracking. We did have one crack and was before we knew about the stoppers and haven’t broke one since we keep them snug. Shouldn’t effect speed change just the ratio changes not the belt length or should be close enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #72
I did put red loctite on the ZAPS bolts. Had to bend a few mounts as well, since the flanges of the ZAPS wouldn't quite fit over, and was afraid the cast would break if I forced them on with the bolts.

7 day forecast is all positive temperatures, and no more snow in the forecast, so there is hope again. Except the snow we have is compacted and frozen from the rain, so will be hard to get rid of.
 

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I tightened a several zaps down on previously bent mounts. The ears on bent around the mount when tightened.

Those that didn't fit quite right, if they didn't get reshaped properly, I tapped them on while tightening the bolt so they would be fully seated.
 

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Discussion Starter #75
The saga continues this spring. Straight cutting flat barley. Grain is dry ( almost forgot that was possible). Straw is still tough, and even looks green. The flex header is picking up everything, very impressed with that. Working beside it with a rigid header, and the rigid is leaving a lot, and spends most of the time pushing dirt.

But the flex head is still feeding poorly, back feeding, wrapping the table auger, and causing a lot of growling and banging in the machine, then plugs the feeder house. So my question, what is backfeeding or causing the noises, and what can be done. Tried different combinations of speeds, feederhouse, vs cylinder vs rotors, without any improvement. Unplugs easily from the cab

I was hoping the ZAPS were the answer. And maybe they were, but i now have a new problem. Last fall when the feeder house was plugging in wet crop, there were no bad noises prior, cylinder rpm didn't drop. So maybe the ZAPs have moved the problem further back to the next weak point?
 

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Probably a silly question, but do you have the kit around the feeder house throat that covers the outside feeder house chains - had a new claas came without it and wouldn't feed at all. Can't imagine that your 585 doesn't.
 

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Does the feed drum on the (Macdon) flexheader have the retractable fingers when you put into reverse. Check the timing on the fingers when running forward as when this screws up causes wads at the front of feeder house and it also starts to back feed. A dirt buildup at the front of the feeder house also does this.
 

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Can you make a video during harvest to get some footage of the issue. It wold be nice to get new eyes on this problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #80
Rained out, found time to respond.
I should have included all the relevant info again. Lexion Maxflex F540 auger flex header. In flex mode right now. Full finger auger. With strippers set tight, tried it without the fingers(except for the center) last fall, didn't stop the wrapping at all. Tried all positions for the finger eccentric.

Moved on from flat barley to flat canola, and it is feeding well, no wrapping or backfeeding, plugs the feederhouse very occasionally, for good reason when it does. But it is tall tangled plants, which drag eachother in, even leaning straight away, it will take it all in without using the reel. Unlike barley which required standing it all up and feeding it back with the reel very aggressively. The barley feeds into the auger as a fluffy random mess. If we push it too fast, it starts grumbling, then plugs the feederhouse, and by fast I mean much over 2 km/hr, or 700 bushels per hour. ~20% engine load. In canola we are achieving close to 100% engine load, and getting comparable tonnes per hour, running the entire 6 feet of stems through the machine.

dg, thanks for the reminder about the covers for the front of the feeder house. I started to build them last fall, will try installing them and see what happens. What is the theory, does the end of the slats catch material and wrap it around and back out the top?
 
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