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I should have included all the relevant info again. Lexion Maxflex F540 auger flex header. In flex mode right now. Full finger auger. With strippers set tight, tried it without the fingers(except for the center) last fall, didn't stop the wrapping at all. Tried all positions for the finger eccentric.

Moved on from flat barley to flat canola, and it is feeding well, no wrapping or backfeeding, plugs the feederhouse very occasionally, for good reason when it does. But it is tall tangled plants, which drag eachother in, even leaning straight away, it will take it all in without using the reel. Unlike barley which required standing it all up and feeding it back with the reel very aggressively. The barley feeds into the auger as a fluffy random mess. If we push it too fast, it starts grumbling, then plugs the feederhouse, and by fast I mean much over 2 km/hr, or 700 bushels per hour. ~20% engine load. In canola we are achieving close to 100% engine load, and getting comparable tonnes per hour, running the entire 6 feet of stems through the machine.

dg, thanks for the reminder about the covers for the front of the feeder house. I started to build them last fall, will try installing them and see what happens. What is the theory, does the end of the slats catch material and wrap it around and back out the top?
I never figured out the physics behind it but a chain doesn’t stand a chance without the end covers installed. I like the wider European ones even better.

finger timing is important and make sure the stripper plates are almost touching
 

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Discussion Starter #82
Got back into barley, installed the side sheilds over the ends of the feeder house. Fed equally bad, still rumbling and growling sounds under the cab. maxed out at 2 km/hr and ~700 bu/hour. The crop starts wrapping at the ends of the auger and feeds in wads. strippers very tight, fingers as unagressive as possible.
Didn't get a video since shortly after starting discovered a bearing out in the center of the table auger( just happened, not related I doubt).
 

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JVW I really feel for you in your struggle to get this crop off! Are you looking in the wrong place for your plugging problem??? There are some strippers for the top feeder chain shaft that keep the buildup away from where the chain rolls onto the sprockets. Are those in place? Regarding the side shields and bottom corners of the feeder house, I had both off of my 480 and 590 for years. I never had a chain jump and minimal feeder house plugging unless the crop was stupid wet or I had wet black dirt on the bottom somewhere. Another friend did the same thing to his 580. No problems in 2,000 hrs except one year on very tough flax he had to bolt some deflectors on each side.

You installed some zaps last winter IIRC. Obviously not a solution. What cylinder do you have? Is your impeller worn down and not stripping materal off the back side of the cylinder? The impeller is pretty important component to keep material moving into the rotors. I recall you saying you were getting 1500 - 2000 bu/hr at times. Those are real good numbers. Is it just in real wet straw that you have so much trouble?
 

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We had absolutely nothing but grief with those same shields removed! Chain’s jumping on HP’s. Even chains jumping on regular feeder houses and they never jump otherwise.

Pretty much have to stop the wad feeding to the feeder chain or it’s hopeless.
 

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We had absolutely nothing but grief with those same shields removed! Chain’s jumping on HP’s. Even chains jumping on regular feeder houses and they never jump otherwise.

Pretty much have to stop the wad feeding to the feeder chain or it’s hopeless.
Joe you just need to get a better swather operator! 😉

I have no experience with HPs. Is that the difference or source of his feeding problems?
 

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I still think it’s coming from the head and is the cause.

I wonder if you took a few fingers out if it would give the chain some more time to chew through the wad.
 

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I would say it is either from the head or impeller. If the straw is dry I doubt it would be the impeller. Have you tried running you reel max speed so it fluffs or breaks apart the mat as it come in. In my opinion a Macdon Flex draper would be a great investment for you. Maybe check with the dealers in your area to see if they would rent you a used one. We once had a bearing holder slack off on the left side which detentioned The impeller belt. We could not feed anything without plugging or crawling. If I remember right 3 of the four bolts fell out of the bearing holder ( one that was never touched by us previously ).
 

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Discussion Starter #90
I would say it is either from the head or impeller. If the straw is dry I doubt it would be the impeller. Have you tried running you reel max speed so it fluffs or breaks apart the mat as it come in. In my opinion a Macdon Flex draper would be a great investment for you. Maybe check with the dealers in your area to see if they would rent you a used one. We once had a bearing holder slack off on the left side which detentioned The impeller belt. We could not feed anything without plugging or crawling. If I remember right 3 of the four bolts fell out of the bearing holder ( one that was never touched by us previously ).
I wouldn't rent me a header to use in these conditions, and I wouldn't want to be liable for damages to a rental header in these conditions. Ground was rolled, but we are scraping the dirt, and still finding rocks, antlers, dirt, scrap metal, and roots, plus lots of mud and dirt. The next two quarters have areas of recent breaking with roots still showing up. The last quarter will have a lot of rocks.
Running reel full speed, and fully down, just to pick it up the crop. It feeds as a fluffy tangled up mess. Tends to leave a pile just behind the knife and keeps feeding the crop over it, which requires moving the reel back to feed it in often. Cutting across the direction it is mostly laid down in. Doing an amazing job of getting all the heads. Have the header pitch set very flat, to get the knife up off the ground slightly to avoid dirt and rocks, but still have lots down pressure to allow lots of float if that makes sense. Last fall, was running it opposite, angled down hard to get knife close to ground and using rigid mode. Flex mode makes feeding even worse, since the reel can't even reach down to sweep material back from the knife. Still very good yields, and ,massive amount of straw.

Straw was green when frozen last fall, still has greenish tinge to it, but is very dry, and falling apart.

What am I looking for regarding wear on the impeller? I haven't crawled in since fall. It has had new wear plates installed, and they were still well above the wear on the impeller itself from before replacement, so I assumed that was a good sign. The impeller hasn't plugged ( except once last fall when rotor belt was slipping). It just makes bad noises until finally plugging feeder house.
 

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Pull one of the lower inspection doors off on the back slope of the grain tank to inspect the impeller. Look at the points of the v in the center for wear. If the v is wore it will not work well. I would also install a knife on the dogs tongue to cut the material going into the rotor. A sunny Brook impeller, knife on the dogs tongue, and a welded up v at the back of the concave solve impeller issues. When the impeller will not feed the material will circulate over the top of the cylinder and APS smashing and bending the front door on the top back of the feeder house that gives you access to the APS ( same door you take off to put the APS caps in). Maybe try run a few minutes will this door off and see if material recirculates and flys on top of the feederhouse.
 

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Discussion Starter #92
Pull one of the lower inspection doors off on the back slope of the grain tank to inspect the impeller. Look at the points of the v in the center for wear. If the v is wore it will not work well. I would also install a knife on the dogs tongue to cut the material going into the rotor. A sunny Brook impeller, knife on the dogs tongue, and a welded up v at the back of the concave solve impeller issues. When the impeller will not feed the material will circulate over the top of the cylinder and APS smashing and bending the front door on the top back of the feeder house that gives you access to the APS ( same door you take off to put the APS caps in). Maybe try run a few minutes will this door off and see if material recirculates and flys on top of the feederhouse.
On the 8460's whenever they backfeed, it does exactly as you describe, and bends the door. This lexion door still looks like new. But I like your idea of running without the door and watch what is going on, will try that as soon as it quits snowing, and the 2 1/4 inches of rain ( plus another day and a half in forecast) goes away.

This straw was long and tough to start with, but by now, it breaks up really easily. It was always in really tough and tall canola straw that the 8460's would wrap. We just finished running 6 foot high canola through the lexion with no issues, but the winter did get some of the green and sap out of it.

I believe you answered this already, but how big a job is it to R and R the impeller?
 

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Maybe thought of and mentioned but If memory serves me " it often doesn't " at least one of the front shafts has no individual speed sensor . Is it possible you have some belt slippage ?
 

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we are scraping the dirt, and still finding rocks, antlers, dirt, scrap metal, and roots, plus lots of mud and dirt. The next two quarters have areas of recent breaking with roots still showing up. The last quarter will have a lot of rocks.
The next time I feel I’m in adverse cutting conditions I’ll just think of this and realize it’s just another day paradise for me.
 

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The impeller is removed from the left side. We usually use a engine hoist to support it as we pull it out. It will take 2-3 hours atleast to get it out if you know what you are doing. You can weld up a knife on the dogs tongue and back of the concave from the impeller hole. You can also replace the rotor bearing easily when the impeller is out. While the impeller is out take of the two small elephant ears on the rotors and see if they are wore in the leading corner. They have to have a business card of space or tolerance or should be as tight as possible without rubbing. You can build them up or buy new ones if wore. First inspect the impeller from the grain tank and see what it looks like. If it looks good the impeller may not be your issue. Call me if you have questions.
 

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Discussion Starter #98
The next time I feel I’m in adverse cutting conditions I’ll just think of this and realize it’s just another day paradise for me.
I failed to mention that it has rained or snowed nearly every day while doing so. So far in May, the weather station south of me shows precipitation on 19 out of 21 days. And snow on the ground for 7 days. We started trying to harvest in April, and i just checked, only had 8 days all month that didn't have precipitation.

And after destroying two reels with crop lifters in the past, I'm going without this year. Doubt they would be effective when the straw is breaking down.
 

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Discussion Starter #99
Here are some pictures of the impeller and elephant ears. I tried to show how much more worn the impeller was before the current wear plates were installed, as the wear plates are much taller than the impeller except at the points in the center.
When you say the elephant ears have to be as close as possible, is this close as possible to the front wall?

Probably will persevere to finish the spring harvest, then pull the impeller before fall and make some upgrads as suggested. The Sunnybrook impeller is an aggresive looking monster compared to this. Is it a necessary upgrade, or if everything is back in shape, and the knife added etc, is it redundant?

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The Sunnybrook impeller is an aggresive looking monster compared to this. Is it a necessary upgrade, or if everything is back in shape, and the knife added etc, is it redundant?
Beneficial, absolutely, necessary depends on your definition.
I would not spend any money or time fixing the original impeller, an SB impeller is the single best improvement you can make to a Claas combine.
 
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