The Combine Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got a rain and have a few days. How long does it take, and how difficult is it, to install the flow kit. I usually get along pretty good working on this machine, just have not done this job. Thanks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,060 Posts
I did mine with the impeller out. I would change the rotor bearings while you are doing this if they have more than 4-500 hours on them. The dealer told me they rarely get a 1000 hours out of the rotor bearings. They are to small for what they do. There is a bolt on the dogs tongue between the rotors that is hard to get at and it was hard to reconnect the grease lines without stripping them. There are a series of bolts that goes around the cover.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,924 Posts
It is not hard. I feel I could have done mine by myself in an easy 6 hours start to finish but...

My right rotor bearing was going bad so I ordered two bearings. I thought I was greasing them better, even though my grease tip often leaks. Since the repair, I bought a "lock n lube" on Amazon and it does not leak grease. $30 well spent. I now understand it is essential to grease these bearings often and do so until grease comes out of the purge hole. The bearings are not hard to install since the bearing hangers are off already for the update. I drilled and tapped a 1/2" hole in one of the bearing covers to use it to pull the bearings off the rotor. It worked well.

I also ordered the 2 elephant ear wear strip per rotor as they were showing wear. This was very difficult to install and adjust with the impeller in the way. The four wear strip have slotted holes and should be adjusted forward as close to the bearing hanger as possible without them striking.

If your impeller needs wear strips, you are installing the flow kit, and might be doing bearings or elephant ears, I would pull the impeller. If your only doing the flow kit it is not hard. Remember to take a strap on the back if each rotor and pull them to the back. The rotor bearings in front hold the rotors from sliding forward.

So far, I am not happy with the flow kit in the 5 acres of soybeans I have done. Might post more about this after talking to dealer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,924 Posts
I didn't have trouble with the grease lines but could see the potential difficulty. I the dog tongue, rotor key, nose piece thingy bolts can be accessed via the upper grain tank covers or from chaffer. I did it from chaffer and had no trouble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,052 Posts
I find it curious that so many rotor bearings go bad we've had 2 480's, then 2 595's and now 2 780's never replaced a rotor bearing. We have had some issues with one of the 595's and impeller to rotor feeding but it was only 1 yr and we even thought it was operator issues but we are not certain of this. We are straight cutting over 90% of our crop now and it is mostly dessicated and have had very little issue feeding or plugging. Incidently I managed to plug the APS this year in the only 60 ac of Canola that we swathed. The other 2100 ac were straight cut without problems...all were dessicated though.

I do feel the 400 series and now the 700 series are a much better combine than the 500 series. We had most troubles with the 595. In fairness the 780's are new to us this year but we had no mechanical problems just a couple of computer and speed sensor problems. I also think that cruise pilot and cemos makes for a more trouble free harvest and we wouldn't operate our combines without it.

Just my 2 cents
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top