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Discussion Starter #1
Since starting on Aug 10, we have combined 14,400 acres of peas, lentils, barley, wheat and durum with a pair of 7010's running 40' 2162 flex drapers. We just finished last night. My crop was hailed out early in the season so I went to work for a local farmer who ran these machines. On my farm we run a pair of 2388's so I was pretty excited to see how their big brother stacked up.

The Good:
I really like the cab. Lots of room, good visibility, quite comfortable and much much quieter than a 2388. The 600 monitor is great too once you get it all figured out. Being able to save crop settings so you can just pull into a field and go was such a nice feature. Being able to change your transmission gear with a dial was great compared to the old stick in the corner of the old series.

As for the combine itself I was under the impression that it was a pretty complicated machine but after using it this much I think it is actually less complicated as a lot of belts, chains and moving parts have been replaced by driveshafts and hydraulics. We only blew one line all harvest; I've blown 4 in a season with a 2388 before on a lot less acres! I liked how most of the hydraulic lines were metal not braided rubber hose; it makes for alot less wear points. There is also very little maintenance on the machine so that was a bonus. The only reason a person should be scared of upgrading to this machine is that it does take a little while to find your way around the computer. The combine did a good job of chopping and spreading the straw. I liked how quick and easy it was to change concaves that weigh half as much as the ones in the 2388. The rotor and fan speed also was much quicker to set as you didn't have to hold the button down for a minute before it would change RPM; it was instant! Seive adjustment from the cab is the best thing going! I found it did a really good job of thrashing the wheat and durum once the hard thrash kit was installed.

The Bad
The feederhouse needs some re-engineering. We broke 4 feederchains on account of rocks at the front of the feederhouse. There just didn't seem to be any give. There was just too much power and no slip. I broke rocks the size of basketballs in half, and then of course the chain would break. I now know the 2162 is terrible for picking up large rocks, but on our 2388 as soon as a rock like that would hit the feederchain the belt would slip. There needs to be an adjustable slip clutch to allow for the same kind of give as the 7010's doesn't slip at all! We also had problems with the drum bearings and shafts going.

Next the unloading auger on this machine is awful. We have never once had a problem on our 2388's regardless of how tough the grain was. On the 7010's we broke belts, chains, and at least 15 shear bolts. We only had the slots on 2/1 in the hopper over the augers. On red lentils testing 15 moisture I had to have my unload rate at 1.5 bu/second or it would break. RIDICULOUS! If the grain was at all tough you had to stop and run the combine at low idle while unloading or you'd break a shear pin. This doesn't do much good when you don't know you have 30bu of semi tough grain in your tank when you're unloading on the go and the bolt breaks or when you can't adjust your auger covers once you have grain in the tank. This setup needs to be fixed bigtime!!!

The return, or rethrasher is a bit of a joke. If you have any amount of green weeds it plugs like crazy. On the weedy peas we had to actually run with the return covers off or we couldn't combine. Good thing peas thrash easy and there weren't many coming through the tailings. It seems like a Mickey Mouse setup for such a large combine and should be changed back to what the 2388's have.

The last problem we kept having was breaking rotor cage veins at the back of the rotor. This happened in semi tough conditions. We broke 7 veins in total between the two combines. You'd know right away because when they hit the chopper it got kind of loud. We put the veins at the back up to the high position and didn't break anymore, but never once have we even touched a vein on our 2388's. Case also had no suggestions to the problem, though it was happening quite a bit and wasn't unique to us. Maybe they should make the cage expand at the back (like the John Deere STS serries does). Just a thought.

Header:
I never thought I'd be running a 40 header over very rough terrain cutting an inch off the ground, but the 2162 changed that in a hurry. We had a Macdon about 10 years ago and were really dissapointed in it. We have run Honey Bee's on our farm for the past 9 years and have been pretty happy with them. After running this header I think I'm trading in one of my Bee's for a 30ft flexdraper. This thing works amazing IF YOU SET IT RIGHT!!! It takes awhile for new springs to loosen up, and takes at least a few hours of trial and error, but once these things are set they will outdo a traditional flexheader any day of the week. The pea auger worked much better than the one on our Bee and we never got any little rocks stuck under the center canvas (a terrible problem with the Bee). There seemed to be an unbelievable amount of hydraulic power driving the canvas. I put a 200lb rock on it and it didn't even stop it!!! That being said this header was terrible for picking up large rocks. I've never picked up anything like this with our Bee's in all our time running them. Word of caution I guess. I also liked how you could adjust the angle of the knife from the cab. That was very handy.

So my overall experience with this combine and header was positive. There are some pretty major issues that need to be addressed and perhaps they will be on the 09 or later machines. If we had over 4000 acres I think this is the machine I would get. Happy harvesting.

BTO
 

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Why would anyone have rocks the size of basketballs or 200lbs!!!! left in a field? It doesn't sound like the feeder needs to be improved it sounds like the rock picker man needs an attitude adjustment. WOW I would be furious if I picked a rock that size with a combine!!!

Anyway I do agree with the rethrasher, we had some problems with canola. We had lots of rain before we go the last 200 ac off and the sprouts were real bad under the swath. If you picked too low you would pull sprouts and it was heck on the rethraser. It was bad conditions but should be something done different.

We also broke some veins in the cage on our 8010. Was thrashing canola and I guess I was trying to run the rotor too slow. Thats the only thing I or my mechanic could come up with. Sped the rotor up and got a dirtier sample but never had any more problems.

Sorry to hear about your crop, hope 09 is a bumper!
 

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The unloader chain tensioner slide has to be lubed. If it is not lubed the tensioner will not move and cause chains to break and shear bolts to break. When unloading the tensioner moves more than one would think.

That might not completely fix your problem, but it is a place to start.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I guess with that many acres they don't have enough manpower to pick their rocks. There will always be the odd large boulder in a field, but yeah, if it was my farm these rocks would have been picked even if I had to hire some hutterites to come out and do it. I'm pretty sure they will be doing a better job next year.

As for the unloader, we lubed the chain pretty pretty frequently but didn't touch the tensioner. I'll pass the word on.
 

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Those mac don headers are the best things going. After running a FD 70 all summer our last wheat job the farmer runs with us and he has a honey bee. After riding with us for one round and seeing it work he said that hes going to own one. That head will make the combine more productive. Mac don really did their homework on this one.
 

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We have 7010 with 2062 36 footer and it has a nasty appetite for rocks as well. It doesn't take a very big rock to take out a chain, or even bend multiple paddles in a split second. This summer I took out both chains with a single rock hit dead center while shaving severely lodged wheat. On 2 other occasions I took out a chain in soybeans. Rocks were just big enough that they wouldn't go under the drum. We're pretty quick now at piecing them together and stuffing them back in again. Apparently the driveline is protected by a slip clutch inside the feeder chain gearbox but it doesn't provide enough cushion to protect the chains when a rock hits the drum. I know a land roller would be a great investment for our fields but that flat wheat was a custom job. Our draper has a rock retarder kit on it and the 7010 has a stone trap. No matter how good you think you are, you just can't watch 36 feet of header going 4-6 mph shaving a dense crop. If anyone knows of a solution other than picking every stone or cutting higher, I'd like to hear it. Our 2377's and previous 2166's would just spit them back out with never anything more than a bent paddle or two. The only other mechanical issue I can think of with our 7010 was a cracked cleaning fan motor mount that was noticed after the speed sensor got chewed up from the vibration.
 

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we also have a 7010 with macdon fd70 and our only problem so far has been picking up softball sized rocks and either jumping a chain link or bending slats or both. this has happened several times in the 30 hours we have run the combine in soybeans.
 
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