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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if anyone else has had fires on the 7120???
We bought 6 this year and have had three burn
one to the ground. Seems to be all in the same place around the fuel tank.
 

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Holy crap, if 3 of my 6 machines id bought just this yr had burned I dont think Id get near the other 3... How much damaged to the 2 that didnt go to the ground? What's in the around the fuel tank that might possible be starting them or is there just enough engine heat in the area? Whats been your dealer/case response?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Dealer has suggested a engine fire!!! But we don't think that is what happened. Thinking maybe static or bad chopper bearings!!
 

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Just about burnt up a 7010 yesterday was burning under the radiator and air screen melted some plastic. I think the fires are starting on the turbo manifold area and then spreading across the machine. Pretty stupid fuel tank design with all the channels in there that dust can settle in and very hard to get cleaned. Seems to be when dust is sticking blow off every 1 hr to 1 1/2. we put 15 gallons water on back. Also there is a cover above fuel tank make sure take these bolts out so youcan clean this area out. If anyone else has ideas to help fire problems let me know
 

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That is high. I know that about 40-50 percent of the first two years' 8010's had the same problem, too. That was way higher than any other combine, until the 70 Series John Deeres were introduced. It was about that, for the first few hundred 70's. In 37 years of observation, I've never seen such a high percentage of fires, period. My theory is that plastic holds/generates more static; add to this, the fact that today's combines are all full of electronics, more wiring than a three bedroom house and a lot more hydraulics than just 25 years ago.

Why is it that combine manufacturers don't even have recalls like the auto makers do? I think it was only a rather small number of Ford Pintos that actually burned, but the recall was fast and effective. At the same time, at least 4 out of 5 or even 9 of 10 Model 815's [International Harvester] with those dual exhaust stacks, burned during their first three years. IHC made no recall on those.
 

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they don't have "recalls" per se, but they do have mandatory programs to fix issues that are deemed worthy (whatever that means). Dealers get a list of machine serial numbers that are affected, and are allotted x amount of labor dollars (with parts provided) to fix the problem.

Not something that hits the front page of the NY Times, but it is relatively effective in most cases.
 

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Good point, torn, exactly right. Some are PIPs (John Deerespeak for Product Improvement Programs), some are fix as fail, but there are several ways companies go about this.
 

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Man 50% and they said that sts's had a high fire rate. Are all the serial numbers real close? I wonder if there was a defect somewhere down the line. Maybe someone got the wheaties peed in.
 

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There are antistatic kits available if that is what is starting the fires. Think they work with the rotary screen and the rad fan. You harvesting a high oil crop of some sort like sunflowers? If conditions are very dirty blow the alternator out regularly, could be the cause of your problem.
 
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Our Massey dealer had a 9895 just about burn up. Cause was, dust accumulation on the turbo.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Just wondering why case sells an antisatic kit for the 7120 as an option if it would stop fires from happening!!!!
 

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Just stop and think about it for a second.

Combines 30 years ago were lucky to have over 200 horse power, and had ZERO emissions. There are now combines with over 500 horsepower in the fields and that takes a serious amount of fuel to acheive that. If you pump fuel to an engine you are going to generate a lot of exhaust heat and when you work in an invrioment that is nothing but dust something is bound to happen some time.


Then you add to the fact the emissions requirements all manufactures are suppose to deal with and that compounds the problem. They have raised cylinder temps to counter act NOx emissions and once again that raises exhaust temps.

Customers demand that these machines do more per hour so manufactures of all colors have answered that demand and this is what we have to work with. There are static kits that that help reduce static, but exhaust temps have to be lowered which would require a major drop in horse power and customers would loose productivity or eliminate dust and we know that is not going to happen.
 

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Just had our 7010 go up.. pretty sure it was the chopper bearing too... i swear i am going to wash the next combine after every crop.. i dont ever want to have to deal with this crap again.
 
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