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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a '75 KW day cab with 290 cummins and the truck is in excellent condition. It has aluminum fronts on it that look good, but the rears are the Dayton 5 spoke style wheels. I don't like the Dayton style that much, just painted black. How hard is it to change them over to a center style pilot hole, so I can find some rims to match the fronts? If its to much trouble to change what are some alternatives?
 

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Hubs will be interchangeable with bud wheels on the same axles. Local wreckers will be able to work with you or you can get new hubs, drums, nuts and seals for around $300 to $400 a wheel. If your going through that much trouble I would go for hub pilot wheels, they are a way better mounting system. Only issue is finding cheaper aluminum wheels, stud pilot should be less then half of hub pilot used, steel wheels are really cheap around here anyway because so many are converting to aluminum wheels.

A little farther maybe you should consider super singles...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I just got my '75 KW w900 home today. I bought it from a guy in Constantine Michigan and it only has around 400k miles on it. The truck is a day cab with wet kit and its in immaculate condition. I think the super singles would look great on it, along with adding another stack to it and make dual straight stacks. When I drove it home from Michigan, down through Indiana and Illinois it got lots of looks. I saw lots of great looking farm land along the way. It was about 600 miles one way and I only traveled on about 50 miles of 4 lane roads, so I got to see a lot of the country side. The trucked preformed flawlessly, I hope my luck with it continues.
 

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Hubs will be interchangeable with bud wheels on the same axles. Local wreckers will be able to work with you or you can get new hubs, drums, nuts and seals for around $300 to $400 a wheel. If your going through that much trouble I would go for hub pilot wheels, they are a way better mounting system. Only issue is finding cheaper aluminum wheels, stud pilot should be less then half of hub pilot used, steel wheels are really cheap around here anyway because so many are converting to aluminum wheels.

A little farther maybe you should consider super singles...
Good info on the hubs, I was never sure about that. I have to say though that every mounting system has it's flaws, Dayton's are a pain to get straight and can lock onto the hub, buds can get the nut stuck on the stud and you have left and right hand threads and hub pilots an also lock onto the hub tighter then ****! Not that I'm telling you anything new, I'm just saying they can all cause fits.
 

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That is so true Farmingflyboy but I'll tell you I would rather beat a pilot hub wheel off any day before dealing with stud pilot or Daytons, I often wonder why they had to do it the hard way before realizing the simple way works best.

D&M Farms, I'd say a little photo display is in order here, let's see that unit and get it CF approved :cool:
 

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I'd like to see you convert to hub-piloted wheels and hubs, but if that's not in the budget right now Truck-N-Tow dot Com (among others) offer hubcaps to update the look of the Daytons.

I agree with NorthernFarmer's post below, don't see a "like" or "thanks" button.
 

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The Daytons that are on there now, are they the original two or three piece split rim ( with tubes of course ) or have they been upgraded to a tubeless wheel ? . If you still have split rims on there, that would be even more of an incentive to change the whole system over to a hub pilot style and use those split rims for mini portable fire pits ;)
 

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and use those split rims for mini portable fire pits ;)
:eek:NO no, give 'em to someone like me:p It's funny, besides one small local tire shop, I am the only other guy in the whole area that will work on those, so I get a lot of neighbors bring them over. I also have a huge stock of used 20 and 22 inch tires, if I ever see any decent ones, I buy them...I actually like them for wagons and stuff I don't use often. Never have to worry about the bead breaking if they leak:D

Needless to say, I only use good ones, once they are rusted bad, that can cause issues with the lock ring, then it's fire pit time....they also make good salt and mineral feeders when you weld a steel bottom in them, cows can't flip them over.

I have several of the actual "split rims" which were built originally for International by Firestone, they are the ones that have the main part of the rim split from the valve opening right thru to the opposite bead. They are so easy to get apart. But to an inexperienced eye, they look like they are cracked. Well you can imagine when one day I happen to have a highboy that a set on it tagging along behind and hit a roadside inspection...the young pup who saw those rims thought he had hit pay dirt...well for a few minutes till he got educated. As for here in Alberta, multi piece rims are still perfectly legal on a licensed farm truck or trailer. But there is hardly a tire shop left that will touch them;)
 
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