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Discussion Starter #1
Don't want to spend the money on a widebody:( Have found a nice 2015 750 with all goodies except tracks. Am I dumb for even thinking of going the no track route?


Seem to be more 740tt to choose from with options I want. Can a guy chip a 2015 740tt and turn it into a 750?


Number one crop is wheat and residue management is important to me. Ran a 2014 750tt in soybeans and it spread a perfect 45' for me.



I notice the mav chaff spreaders have metal winged fingers on them. Do these do a better job of spreading chaff than the cupped ones on a turbo chop?


REdekop has lexion choppers they claim can get out to 45'. We put them on our deeres and in soybeans they did a great job at 35'.



Thoughts.
 

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Tracks are great in mud and make the side of the machine more serviceable. If you do not battle mud big duals work just fine. The tracks are also narrower when parking it in your shop. In wheat a 740 should do just fine and likey would not need to be chipped. With our wide body rotor loss is the limitation in wheat not power.
 

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If you do most of the maintance on your combine yourself you will really appreciate the tracks, compaction on the tracks is minimum even in dry years you can appreciate having tracks we found.
Road speed on the 740tt is awesome. No option beats having tracks on a combine in my opinion, unless you have lots of rocks.
especially when field can be a bit slick the tracks will give you more stability and leave less of a mess.
ask yourself how often have tires left you a mess in the field.
it adds up quickly if you are stuck having to work the field because of ruts from the combine.
 

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buy the 740tt would never go back to tires worse case ontario you have to chip it would not throw a 45' header on a narrow body but would depend on your crop i guess. so if your going with a 35' header the mav would probably be fine.
 

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I believe the 740 and 750 both have same motor, so probably could turn up 740. Having had tracks and seeing how they can absolutely save a crop when the weather turns nasty wet, I would not be without them. Having said that there is still lots of combines on duals being made, and most years it would be fine. Combine is definitely easier to service with tracks(not counting track maintenance).

I would say the year makes as big of a difference though, lots of very nice improvements in 2016, prior upgrades would be dynamic cooling in 2014 I believe it was. 780 got those improvements one year prior.

In tough wheat with heavy straw or tough soybeans power can be an issue. I have a sense that you grow good heavy crops, so can't discount the need for power.
 

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The tire/track debate depends on your local conditions. Nobody runs tracks on a combine where I live. They have a reputation for being overly priced and to hard to turn on the ends. (Which is kinda funny as there are lots of grain carts and tractors on tracks.) Haven't had a year where we needed them in the fall since '76?? (IIRC) so everybody considers them "too expensive". The road crews hate them...insist they tear the blacktop roads up. Go 75 miles north and lots of track machines.

So pick the one that works best for your farm and your budget.
 

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We are easily getting 40' to 45' in Australia with Redekop MAV. Many variables: Head width, crop type, yield, moisture, wind etc.
Chasing 50' plus residue spread when running 50' and 60' heads.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The 750 has lowest hours and is the cheapest. Tempting but those darn tracks are tempting too
 

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The 750 has lowest hours and is the cheapest. Tempting but those darn tracks are tempting too
You won't be thinking about what the tracks cost after you have them. Basically pay for them once and then enjoy them forever.:wink:
 

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760tt was just listed on agtalk classifieds with 900 sep hours. Its exactly what I was looking for, a few months too late. Its a good bit under market value also.
 

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I believe the 740 and 750 both have same motor, so probably could turn up 740. Having had tracks and seeing how they can absolutely save a crop when the weather turns nasty wet, I would not be without them. Having said that there is still lots of combines on duals being made, and most years it would be fine. Combine is definitely easier to service with tracks(not counting track maintenance).

I would say the year makes as big of a difference though, lots of very nice improvements in 2016, prior upgrades would be dynamic cooling in 2014 I believe it was. 780 got those improvements one year prior.

In tough wheat with heavy straw or tough soybeans power can be an issue. I have a sense that you grow good heavy crops, so can't discount the need for power.
I had to look that up because I am surprised! You are correct! A C13 (2012) in a 740 with 402 HP and power bulge to 436. On tracks the 740 has 330 bu tank, same as 750 on wheels I think is what the spec sheet says. 750 has C13 with 456 HP and power bulge to 543. I was thinking about the 570 series with the C9 and it was under powered but if the 740 has the C13 it should be a great combine. That is a better engine in many ways.

I mean I am not surprised that you are correct!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The lexion on agtalk has standard mav chopper. We would run a 40' head so I don't know if that is the answer unfortunately. Talked to the guy has about 3.2 million bushels thru it.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Can a pro chop be added to a machine with a mav? There is a brand new pro chop on auction site I found funny enough
 

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The early 740s have a co, good engine but the bigger one has a better reputation.

Our 740 MAV has been modified some and will easily throw 40'. Was throwing 45+ in damp wheat a week ago.
 

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Like seedcleaner said a MAV chopper is a good chopper with some modifications and can spread wheat straw 40ft plus. With some modifications to the chaff spreader and chopper our 590/595 machines do a good job of spreading and I have no complaints. Last year we were spreading straight cut 50 bushel per acre canola straw 40ft and very evenly. I like my MAV choppers but have not tried any of the others. The spread out of the modified MAV is superior to the JD S680 and Case Machines that operate beside us.
 

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The Mav chopper works fine for us... With 40 ft headers. After adding wind hammers on ends and tuning the blades you can pretty much forget about them except for flipping or swapping blades... Almost never plug them either... I see several advantages over the newer versions... Simplicity and reliability being the 2 main points
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The new redekop MAVS have a 8 rows of knifes on the drum. Wind speeds upto 195mph. However they are looking at six weeks for build out.
 
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