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Discussion Starter #1
It has been talked a lot about in the forum but I would like to refresh a few opinions or advice from those who know the subject.
I would love for you to know first of all that I am from Argentina , combine AFX in question is a 8120 with 16 row head to one of corn and soybeans 40 feet ...
I would like to know what settings you guys considered ideal for both crops ?
One of my main problems is the high volume return insiten technicians here that this does not work combine with the 2300 series layer was practically doing nothing in return and getting a very good cleaning of grain.
These are the settings we use here :
corn :
Rotor : 350 - 400 rpm
APERTURE of concave : 25-30
Fan: 850-900 rpm
sieve top 21
lower sieve : 18

Depressed round front and rear bar thick crop (corn and soybeans ) .

soybean
Rotor : 500-600 rpm
APERTURE of concave 15-25
Fan: 750-850 rpm
sieve top 18
lower sieve : 14

All concave thick crop (corn and soybeans ) .

And sensivilidad sensors lost is:
rotor 30
sieve 30
return 100

I hope their views. Thank you.
 

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Your fan speed looks too slow for both crops.

Your rotor speed in soybeans looks a little slow to me. I never paid much attention to book settings for rotor speed in soybeans. Speed the rotor up until you split/crack some and then back it down some.

Have you tried to open your bottom sieve more and just clean with the top sieve?

What's your crop look like down there?
 

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These are my soybean settings for 8120 in Canada...thousands of KMs away lol!

Rotor 750
Fan 1100
Concave 3-4
Top Sieve 14
Bottom Sieve 15

I should note that we barely get our beans in before winter and combined at 15-17% moisture. If they are drier, I'd probably be able to open concave. We used first row small wire, second row large wire, third row large wire and last row slotted. As a rule that I follow, bottom sieve in any crop is never closed more than top sieve.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the tips!
Here soybean crop with 9-14% moisture and 14-16% corn ... worth rinse!
I have tried to use the inverted configuration of sieves without good results, maybe not encourage me enough to open the line, when I comment after having learned here in the forum try to fool me.
The truth is that I find it a bit complicated cleaning system series 8 machine I had the 2300 series and I found it much easier to point them in any crop ...
 

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Here is what you do. Set your crop on soybeans on your monitor. Put my settings in, maybe slow the rotor to 700 and open concave to 10 because you are doing them dry (those maybe have to be adjusted based on conditions, however as long as your pods are shelling and you aren't cracking seeds, it has little to do with cleaning. Fan setting 1000-1100, depending on seed size. You'll have to check if you're blowing lots over! Set your sensitivity on your sieve loss to 30. Set your bottom sieve to about 15. Drive .5 km/hr or .25 mph just barely taking crop in by just crawling along. Adjust your top sieve until loss monitor stays at bottom green. Then adjust bottom sieve to be about equal or slightly bigger. If you can't get in green, turn wind down and repeat, 50 rpm increments. What you are doing is trying to find the terminal velocity of the grain, the point where it just is floating on top of the top sieve but does fall through. Load up combine at full speed, recheck and repeat if necessary by either adjusting wind or sieve. If you change a sieve setting, you likely have to change fan setting. Close sieve, more wind, etc. If you close up bottom sieve too much, you are stopping air flow which can create overloading sieves which create sieve loss. This method can and should be used in every crop.

A loss settings guide to help you: http://pami.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Canola-Coucil-of-Canada-PAMI-Seed-Loss-Guide.pdf

Good luck. I don't grow corn.
 

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I'm not sure what style of module/concaves you have in your machine? Round bars seem to work very well in higher moisture corn with wetter material feeding in. I do think they tend to break up the cob though. I see your corn is dry, I would assume most of the trash feeding in is dry too?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'm taking the Nicemustang practice, I will follow the steps you indicate to me you try to set the combine!
Midwest, that's one of the problems we have here, to harvest as dry cereals have much income and material combine within it fragments into many small pieces ...
 

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So, what concaves are you using?

More fan speed should help with all the trash.

Also, what style of top sieve is in your machine?

I used to like round bar concaves, last year we had soft cobs, I battled cob in the sample versus open the top sieve and get something done all harvest. I finally settled on " how does the sample look coming out of the dryer". The corn I harvest is almost all over 20% moisture.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
For corn are using round bar concave in Part threshing and large wire in the part of separation, to use all the concave soybean thick wire ...
The type of sieve we use is 1 1/8 (the smallest) in both top and lower sieve.
 

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I don't think I would use round bars with corn that dry. I would try the large wire, if you have them, and see if that let's less trash on your sieves. You could always pull some wires out and try that.

We run the 1 5/8's sieves for corn and beans. I think that this is common in corn.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This harvest will test using large wire concave ... Before you put the sieves had 1 5/8 and the technicians were saying that let a lot of material to the lower sieve ... That this type of shaker is only used when there are high returns!
 

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If you are really getting high returns in corn you are creating a bad situation. The high returns have to go someplace and that is back on your sieves. 8120 return volume sensors were not the most reliable device.

I would try to clean with my top sieve. Watch your top sieve grain loss monitor, it will tell you when you've reached capacity. Open the bottom sieve, your airflow will help the capacity for your top sieve.
 

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I hear a lot on this forum and from people I talk with that the older series *88/*130 Case combines were easier to set. I've been thinking about that a lot. Yes the air balance is a bit different on the sieves, but it's not *that* different. The rotor is a bit shorter on the new machine, but otherwise identical. The only thing I can think of is that the older machines were more forgiving mainly because they masked the problems of incorrect settings, or dealt with them in a different way. Part of it could be that scaling up the horsepower is showing weaknesses in the system as well (like rotor loss).

On the older series, people tend to run with the top sieve open quite wide and the bottom sieve closed to clean the sample. Tailings return to the rotor masked threshing and cleaning settings problems, though it may have actually "fixed" both problems by reprocessing in the rotor, but we can't be sure that tailings didn't just exit the rotor as loss in the end.

So now with the new machines with the rethresher (which doesn't actually seem to anything on any crop we grow), incorrect settings become a greater problem. For one tailings loads build to a higher level because they are just circulating until they either eventually fall through the bottom sieve or fall off the back of the combine. And closing the bottom sieve too much starves the top sieve of air, also leading to losses going over the back as the top gets overloaded with mog. High tailings volume also means the top sieve isn't doing enough cleaning, but also that the rotor isn't threshing properly (overthreshing usually).

In some ways it is more complicated because we have to deal with these problems now instead of just punting it all back into the rotor for a second go. But given that the reasoning Case claims for not using a return system anymore is that the rotor was often overloaded by the return system, or at least robbed of capacity, that seems to tell me we were doing things not quite right before (and maybe now). I suspect tailings loads have been high for years on the older series combines, which means the rotor wasn't threshing right to begin with. Ideally if the threshing and separating is being done correctly, tailings volume should be close to zero on the old or new series. That's my theory anyway. Could be wrong.

Thanks for your excellent settings tips, nicemustang. Good tips for any combine of any series and brand I think.
 

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Also torrum, alot of the cleaning issues were helped by the auger bed feeding the front of the sieves evenly and consistently.

Run the machine based off engine load.. keep her at 95-100% all day.. it will help almost everything... cleaner sample, less returns.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Torriem share with you, my friends for Case focused on giving power to their machines without thinking that the rotor would reach their full potential ... Here in Argentina the Case combine harvester was synonymous with excellent quality losses and low seed, but that left alone for 88 series, now the 120/230 series but have greater ability to process material lost its power and increased crop quality! !
Units that are closer to all the progress that makes the brand, know if they are working on some changes to the rotor?
Thanks for the advice 8850jd, I will consider ...
 

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It seems backwards.. i know i fought it too... but with less threshing material it allowed for threwput.... but requures crop material to create the threahing action.. if you dont overfill the machine the crop just bounces out...

They removed restrictions... have the problem with corn... 8 rows have higher losses then 12 row heads... would seem backwards but because they opened up the area you need more grain on grain...
It allows for more crop flow, but comming from the 88 series, you think its tolerant, but its not...
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I also think it works better the more filled the combine, even I have the impression that the more even and full sieves better! So take the decision to lift about 2 inches rear axle carrying the inclination of the frame about 4.3 degrees hooked with draper, I think with the hopper full could increase something ... I hope that the whole system work better cleaning!
 

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The only problems is for max results your going to be short of horsepower... like the combine needs more power to work properly..

They took too much restriction out of the rotor... if the combine had 100 more horsepower and you could push that, it would still want more...
 

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1 5/8 sieves are standard here, depends on rotor configuration, 1 5/8 for corn and beans, we use them for all crops, modules for corn and beans round module,s , vane settings, theres a lot that can be done to machine, keep it full, Scott.
 
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