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Discussion Starter #1
I've got a case 8230 with a 13L Iveco engine in it. My combine blows all the engine oil out of the breather filter housing when put under full load. Yeah, not a pretty sight. I haven't run the motor without oil pressure, and can even run the combine around at an idle. It makes no concerning noises. After confirming there was no plugged filter and no foreign material on the intake side of the air filter, I ran the motor and it did the same thing. Breather "tube" goes back through intake to turbo, so plugged breather tube is out. Any ideas?

An important side note, I changed the crank case breather filter at the beginning of harvest and initially had it in the wrong orientation. Ran for about 20 minutes before we realized what had happened and flipped it. Ran for 300+ hours all harvest until this problem arose with 20 acres to go. Noticed engine was consuming oil in the days leading up to this. All local dealers are scratching their heads at it. I am certainly no diesel mechanic, so any ideas or similar experiences with iveco motors would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I would look at the crankcase filter again. Maybe it claps or something.
I don’t know if you can but fallow where the oil goes from there?
 

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Thinking out loud and trying to give things to consider. Best I can do not being there to look at it. Let us know what you find, please.


How is the crankcase blowby? Every crankcase breather I have seen has a baffle inside the engine or someplace to keep oil from splashing out. Make sure it is still in place and working.

You will need to verify why and where the oil is leaving the engine from. From crankcase filter housing, for sure? Is it being pushed out from to much air volume, blowby? Or from it not being restricted with a baffle to keep it in the engine? Or is it being sucked out or pumped out in some strange way.

Turbo with bad shaft seals can sometimes suck and or pump the oil out of the engine.
 

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Are you positive that your intake air filters aren’t plugged? For example if the filter sensor went bad and is not detecting restriction. In theory this could increase the velocity in the crankcase ventilation circuit.
 

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had on my 500 hd the vent system screwed up and plugged my air to air. I disconnected from turbo and ran hose to atmosphere.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thinking out loud and trying to give things to consider. Best I can do not being there to look at it. Let us know what you find, please.


How is the crankcase blowby? Every crankcase breather I have seen has a baffle inside the engine or someplace to keep oil from splashing out. Make sure it is still in place and working.

You will need to verify why and where the oil is leaving the engine from. From crankcase filter housing, for sure? Is it being pushed out from to much air volume, blowby? Or from it not being restricted with a baffle to keep it in the engine? Or is it being sucked out or pumped out in some strange way.

Turbo with bad shaft seals can sometimes suck and or pump the oil out of the engine.
I've put 3 different new breather filters on, and even replaced entire plastic housing on the side of motor. Air filters were replaced halfway through harvest and blown out daily. Supposedly local case dealer tested for cc blowby, but found nothing suspicious. Although I wouldn't be surprised if they tested at idle with a cool engine. The problems occur under a load with a hot motor.

The filter housing is definitely where it leaks from, the pressure builds so high you can watch the housing bow outwards until something gives (plastic or a seal) and it sends the oil out.
 

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[QUOTE="spreadsheetmonkey, post: 3405776, member: 166711")
The filter housing is definitely where it leaks from, the pressure builds so high you can watch the housing bow outwards until something gives (plastic or a seal) and it sends the oil out.
[/QUOTE]
It sounds like you have a hole in a piston, more than just blow by
 

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The filter housing is definitely where it leaks from, the pressure builds so high you can watch the housing bow outwards until something gives (plastic or a seal) and it sends the oil out.
Holy.
I'm with KWO on this.
Either that engine is done or there is a blockage between the filter housing and the intake.
Somebody better recheck the blow by on that engine hot and under load.
 

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I know one of the Hutteritite combines (8230 or 9230) had one of their 6 combines go down. They found a hole in the piston. FWIW. Looks like a major engine failure. I think they priced out a drop-in replacement at 80,000!!! I think they are considering replacing piston and sleeve themselves. Don't know for sure!
 

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Sounds like a hole or crack in piston
 

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Discussion Starter #15
We got the oil sample back today and it was as the guy put it "perfect". Hopefully the absence of dirt or metal in the oil points to a problem that does not include replacing my motor. I'm hoping its some strange problem with the breather that is much less expensive to resolve.
Case ih price for remanned engine was 77k USD, 95 new. Thats no labor or additional costs. The core charge for my old motor to case would be 3k. Incredible. I would be interested to know what their actual costs and return is on something like that.
 

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Can you do a relative compression test? Would tell you if one cylinder has low resistance to cranking, low compression. I would think it can be done with a cheap oscilloscope if nothing else.
 

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Think what I would do first before condemning the engine is remove the breather pipe from the engine and plug the draw where the gases go back into the intake.
Run it in the field a physically watch what is coming out of the breather pipe.
Make sure that the engine is running up to proper temperature.
A nice steady stream and the volume that comes out will tell the story.
If you see puffs or strokes out the breather this will indicate a bad cylinder.
 

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I don't know if it is possible with the newer engines but I would unscrew injectors and hook on a gauge on each of the cylinders and check compression. It sure looks like you have excessive blow by on a cylinder. You had mentioned that you were seeing increased oil usage leading up to this failiure - something serious is going on and it is more than just a plugged crankcase breather filter IMO. I hope I am wrong but with that much crankcase pressure something is seriously wrong and not a simple fix. Keep us posted please!
 

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I would first do a crankcase pressure check yourself, it is much easier to get a digital water manometer from amazon then use an actual manometer due to the fact that you can run the machine in the field and have someone watch the digital one. The procedure FPT outlines has you make your own pressure port in the oil fill cap on the top of the valve cover. Drill a hole in the cap and install a 1/4 inch nipple in it make sure it seals well then order a new cap. Install the manometer onto the cap and warm the engine up. Under full load and rated RPM the reading should be less then 8-12 inches of water with a fully functional crankcase breather system. An oil soaked crankcase filter on an engine with some hours will get it close to there. If it is high we need to figure out why, in the past I have found the valve on the outside cover of the crankcase breather to be plugged causing pressure to build and blow the cover off. You said you replaced the entire cover so it is likely not it. I would remove the hose from right out of the breather cover and make sure you can blow air through it and it's unobstructed you should be able to move air through the breather valve as well but it does have a check valve so if you suck too fast it should close. Depending on the cab style the older machines have had an issue with the intake elbows collapsing under full load and suffocating the engine however I have not seen them suck oil up through the breather in fact that is what the valve is there for is to stop oil from going directly into the intake but it is something I would watch for while testing. The dealer can do a quick cylinder cut out test with their EST, it is not as complete of testing as Cat's is it still can tell you some things. They should run at full throttle and make note of the fuel flow as they kill each cylinder. When finished if you find a fuel flow that does not change or changes very little when a particular cylinder is cut out that cylinder is producing less power then the others and should be looked at. The easiest way I know to look into the cylinders is to remove an injector and use a scope. When you say it blows all the oil out under load how fast are we talking? Like 1/2 hr. or 1/2 day? Does the engine smoke? Have we found where the oil that it was consuming before the mess is going ie through the turbo and into the intake? How does the engine start and has anything else changed that you can think of fuel flow, lack of power, engine overheated, anything like that?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I would first do a crankcase pressure check yourself, it is much easier to get a digital water manometer from amazon then use an actual manometer due to the fact that you can run the machine in the field and have someone watch the digital one. The procedure FPT outlines has you make your own pressure port in the oil fill cap on the top of the valve cover. Drill a hole in the cap and install a 1/4 inch nipple in it make sure it seals well then order a new cap. Install the manometer onto the cap and warm the engine up. Under full load and rated RPM the reading should be less then 8-12 inches of water with a fully functional crankcase breather system. An oil soaked crankcase filter on an engine with some hours will get it close to there. If it is high we need to figure out why, in the past I have found the valve on the outside cover of the crankcase breather to be plugged causing pressure to build and blow the cover off. You said you replaced the entire cover so it is likely not it. I would remove the hose from right out of the breather cover and make sure you can blow air through it and it's unobstructed you should be able to move air through the breather valve as well but it does have a check valve so if you suck too fast it should close. Depending on the cab style the older machines have had an issue with the intake elbows collapsing under full load and suffocating the engine however I have not seen them suck oil up through the breather in fact that is what the valve is there for is to stop oil from going directly into the intake but it is something I would watch for while testing. The dealer can do a quick cylinder cut out test with their EST, it is not as complete of testing as Cat's is it still can tell you some things. They should run at full throttle and make note of the fuel flow as they kill each cylinder. When finished if you find a fuel flow that does not change or changes very little when a particular cylinder is cut out that cylinder is producing less power then the others and should be looked at. The easiest way I know to look into the cylinders is to remove an injector and use a scope. When you say it blows all the oil out under load how fast are we talking? Like 1/2 hr. or 1/2 day? Does the engine smoke? Have we found where the oil that it was consuming before the mess is going ie through the turbo and into the intake? How does the engine start and has anything else changed that you can think of fuel flow, lack of power, engine overheated, anything like that?
Unsure of where the oil that it was burning went. Could have also been leaking so slowly from the filter that it went un noticed. Just don't know. The most recent episodes it builds pressure and cracks the filter housing, then sends the oil out at a gallon per minute. The first time that happened I got a low pressure warning in the cab and immediately shut the key off. Never really ran again after that, we had a guy standing there to watch it, and obviously weren't going to run if you can watch the whole filter housing building pressure and bowing haha.

Everything else seems to be in order, starts fine, no bad noises, smokes a little on start up but clears up. Engine temp is fine as well. Oil pressure (when housing not broken) looks good. If it had taken out a cylinder wouldn't metal show up in the oil sample? Oil sample came back with no metal or dirt.
 
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