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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do the 9120 go in Australia? Small tube rotor or afx? 40ft light crop fingers to keep speed up or witch are the best knife guards ? Do they have trouble with loses seive or rotor and how do you fix?
 

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Ooohhh Deere
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My brain is struggling to get the jist of your random questions aussie. It seems the only header you haven't asked something about is the Laverda. What's your plan? Or are you just a curious fellow?

9120 will Guzzle diesel big time.
Big tube rotor for our conditions.
40-45' Macdon with normal knife guards is just fine. If by chance theirs a few soldiers in light crops you can speed the knives up via a valve on the pump. Crary double cut guards if you really really want to spend a few thousand$$$$.
Doesn't need a Dicks Extension!!
Usually they are quite forgiving on losses.
Usually they are set and forget.
 

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If you don't have heavy straw, the normal rotor would probably work just fine for you. In small grains, most of your losses will be rotor, not sieve.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have heard the rotor loses are the main one, if they are the same rotor as the 88 , why such high loses? All dry land here, how bad on fuel are they? They would be great with less belts and rotor reverse. Have been told to speed knife up. And I am just a curious fellow.
 

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Shorter, the big thing is the concaves have larger wrap is larger which causes them to have less vanes... so the crop is pushed rearward faster...

If you don't have the rotor full 100% of the time you will not get good threshing... not enough metal to slow the crop down.
 

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Try one last fall, & liked it, this is coming from a green guy. A friend of my that use to sell they told me to go with the 8120.We dont often have a lot of straw. He said at the end of the day I would combine the same amount & burn a lot less fuel.
 

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The 88 series doesn't have the horsepower to push the crop through so you normally have to back off a bit before your loses get bad. I have a 7120 and loss is amazing low against the last 2388 Been told I'm trying to starve the sheep
 

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No I haven't but there are some around. Know of an 8120 bought to replace an 7120 in canola for the larger sieves.
Two go fast farmers BTO have gone yellow from their 8120,haven't spoke to them to see what they think.
BIL has got over 45 tonne an hour in barley with his 7120 with low losses /good sample
 

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I have heard the rotor loses are the main one, if they are the same rotor as the 88 , why such high loses? All dry land here, how bad on fuel are they? They would be great with less belts and rotor reverse. Have been told to speed knife up. And I am just a curious fellow.
Truth be told I don't think the rotor losses on the flagship rotors are greater than the old 88 series. If so then the only reason is that more horsepower just pushes more grain over.

I disagree with jd8850 about keeping the rotor loaded, though his theory about crop movement speed is interesting (you can put the vains in slow position... I've tried it). Yes in certain circumstances you will get better threshing (more grain on grain). But a 7120 at 100% load is probably a 9120 at 70% load. Yet the 9120 is not going to lose lots of grain while the 7120 doesn't; they are the same rotor. In wheat and especially canola, my tests show slowing down some reduces rotor losses. I used to run the combine as close to 100% as possible. Now instead of going for a 9120, we've gone for two 7120s. We run them between 75 and 85% most of the time unless we're in a real hurry. They seem to run well, and have a combined (no pun intended) capacity quite a bit greater than a 9120.

Also a longer rotor doesn't necessarily help with rotor losses. I read the PAMI report on the White rotary, which is the same as the modern Massey (Agco) rotary, which is the longest in the industry. PAMI recorded 2-3% rotor loss with this very long rotor in hard red spring wheat, probably 70 bu/ac crop. Now Massey uses little rub bars instead of long rub bars, not sure how that affects it.

Depending on how you look at it, 2-3% loss is either really bad or amazingly good. Keeping 97-98% of the grain in the combine is quite a feat, really, especially at modern speeds, and with such high-yielding crops. In any case, I feel that combines of any color will lose 2% at least under the best conditions. Makes me feel good about my own losses when I see the green as grass fields around my area in the fall when the volunteers germinate. Combines of all colors.

Some people feel like the flagship combines are harder to set. I think this could be true. Because of the rethreshing system, you have to work harder at setting the rotor correctly. In the olden days, poor threshing could be compensated for by dumping the tailings back into the rotor for another go. With the rethresher, in small grains, it does very little to partially threshed heads to rethresh them. So you end up just overloading your tailings and getting grain in the fan. Now, as before, the real cause of the tailings problem is poor threshing. Before we could just cheat a little.
 

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You need to look at a gleaner to help understand what i mean by crop movement... its a controlled crop movement.. controling the number of rotations..
I have also run our 7010 with gordon bars.. (larger threshing elements) and it seemed to have better loss levels in wheat, corn and beans when at 100% engine loads..
The 7130 that replaced it, has by far less losses in my conditions.
 

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Yeah Gleaner does seem to have a great wheat and small grains combine.

I think a lot of folks that prefer the older series prefer it because it's more forgiving (as I mentioned before). It could very well be that this experiment with rethreshers will prove to not be so great an idea. Though the rationale for the rethresher is that many folks were overloading their rotors with high tailings returns, which is symptomatic of improper rotor settings.
 
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