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Price …… is usually the biggest problem. But that’s not restricted to red.
They’ve all got stratospheric price tags on them!

And I’ve got to ask. Why a 92 & not an 82?
 

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For whatever reason, class 9 are the most popular in many parts of Saskatchewan. In Alberta class 8 seems to be the most common.

It's interesting how nominal conditions vary across the provinces. For me a class 8 just burned more fuel than a class 7 with no additional capacity. Class 9 would be similar for me. For others not too far away class 9 is not enough power.
 

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I can only provide information on my 8250 “chrome” ….. & it is limited at this stage, simply because I’ve only done rice with it so far. Our cereal harvest will start the last week of October.
However, I can confidently say the ‘50 is an improvement on the ‘40. The totally new feeder house is smoother than the ‘40 & provides a smoother feed to the rotor. Something has improved in the cleaning system as well. Maybe they plugged up the holes where air escapes! I haven‘t had a chance to pull sieves out to see what differences there are yet.
I have a Redekop ”Euro spec” factory fitted chopper …… yep, not cheap …. but excellent chop & spread.
So I don’t any reason why you won’t be happy with the 92 …… AS LONG AS ITS SETUP PROPERLY.
16lt motor will definitely use more fuel than the 12.9lt.
 

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Lots of 9240/9250s here in SK because Monette Farms buys 25 or so new per year. 45ft heads as well. In pulses and canola a 92 will just burn more fuel with no additional capacity. 8240/8250s are a much better size of machine in my opinion.
 

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Lots of 9240/9250s here in SK because Monette Farms buys 25 or so new per year. 45ft heads as well. In pulses and canola a 92 will just burn more fuel with no additional capacity. 8240/8250s are a much better size of machine in my opinion.
Ill second that. In our hills we need the horsepower of an 8240 vs 7240. 9240 would just burn more fuel in our pulse crops. Here in Montana, our dealer sells pretty much all 8 series machines.
 

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For whatever reason, class 9 are the most popular in many parts of Saskatchewan. In Alberta class 8 seems to be the most common.

It's interesting how nominal conditions vary across the provinces. For me a class 8 just burned more fuel than a class 7 with no additional capacity. Class 9 would be similar for me. For others not too far away class 9 is not enough power.
Just curious, are you running same size heads? Or how are you comparing the class 7-8-9?
 

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Same head, yes. We've kept the same head through three machines so far. The 8120 had no increased capacity whatsoever over the 7010 we had before (same speed, same throughput), but burned more fuel, which was a huge disappointment to us. I know of others that have had similar experiences in this area. In our conditions more hp often means you just lose grain faster while burning more fuel. There are many limiting factors other than HP. We now run a 7230 and 7240. Class 8 would be a waste of money for us. However the 7240 has about as much hp as the 8120 had, but seems to have a more efficient engine as it's easier on fuel than the 8120 was.

Off topic, but all of this leads me to call BS on the guys that claim you have to keep the combine full for it to work best. So you have a class 7, 8 and 9 machine, all identical in every way except horsepower. A "full" 7120 could be a 9120 at 70% engine load. So the 9120 would not be "full" but the 7120 would be doing the same exact material through-put.
 

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Same head, yes. We've kept the same head through three machines so far. The 8120 had no increased capacity whatsoever over the 7010 we had before (same speed, same throughput), but burned more fuel, which was a huge disappointment to us. I know of others that have had similar experiences in this area. In our conditions more hp often means you just lose grain faster while burning more fuel. There are many limiting factors other than HP. We now run a 7230 and 7240. Class 8 would be a waste of money for us. However the 7240 has about as much hp as the 8120 had, but seems to have a more efficient engine as it's easier on fuel than the 8120 was.

Off topic, but all of this leads me to call BS on the guys that claim you have to keep the combine full for it to work best. So you have a class 7, 8 and 9 machine, all identical in every way except horsepower. A "full" 7120 could be a 9120 at 70% engine load. So the 9120 would not be "full" but the 7120 would be doing the same exact material through-put.
I agree with your last statement.
As to the first I know a few guys that run CIH 7XX0, 8XX0 and 9XX0 machines together and they claim the 9XX0 machines burn very little more fuel if run side by side with same headers.
But when it gets tough and/or you start putting through lots of straw and making use of the extra HP in the bigger engine fuel use rises A LOT.
I do NOT understand how more HP alone can really make a combine "BIGGER" as to harvesting/threshing/separating ability??
This year there will be a lot of class 9/10 machines harvesting crop that a class 2 combine could run through with ease!!!!
Does anyone have an 80ft Honey Bee draper header laying around I could borrow? LOL
I would only need it a day or 2!!
 

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Off topic, but all of this leads me to call BS on the guys that claim you have to keep the combine full for it to work best. So you have a class 7, 8 and 9 machine, all identical in every way except horsepower. A "full" 7120 could be a 9120 at 70% engine load. So the 9120 would not be "full" but the 7120 would be doing the same exact material through-put.
Agree. 8240 ran its best around 75-85% engine load….. depends on the crop. Anything more you were either pushing through mud or pushing up hill.
8250 - at this stage - seems to be the same. There maybe be some extra HP that could be used via HarvestCommand but I very much doubt setting “maximum power at 100+%” would be optimistic ….. at best! This coming harvest may prove me wrong but I’ll be surprised if that’s the case.

No pun intended….. 😉
 

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We are looking at the possibility of purchasing a 9250 combine for this upcoming fall. Are there any major issues or problems that any of you have experienced with them?
This is info for anyone looking to purchase a combine from the 20 series up to the 50 series. Used to work on them daily for years, so some tips for all of you.

Feeder slip clutch.
Keep the slip torque between 375 and 400 foot pounds. If rebuilding 1, set it at 400lbs, manually slip it 4 or 5 times to break it it. REMEMBER, soak the fibre disc's minimum 1 hour in the oil to saturate, or torque will be WAY out whack.

Feeder chain sprocket shaft.
Never did myself, but, if older series requires 1, install 8010 shaft. It does NOT have that grease nipple. All that business is a internal non serviceable clutch. Never grease an existing 1 unless you are having slip issues. If still slipping, shaft needs replacing. Garbage design!

Feeder slip clutch splines.
Keep them lubed yearly. There is no nipple, so, pull slip clutch off, antisieze splines, replace felt seals and reinstall. When apart, check splines on both ends. Clutch shaft splines will take out sprocket shaft splines, and visa versa. Expensive fix for not lubing splines.

Rotor
Never blow out rub bars unless doing them all.. Then ensure EVERY 1 is totally clean. Balance is essential.
Concave adjustable motors blow at times. Nature of the beast. Comes from lots of slugging, usually. Don't be alarmed if it happens. Just replace it and slow down a bit. Lol

Chopper
I live in SE Saskatchewan, so no corn experience. However, never drop chopper in low! Unless you want to replace inner chopper shafts regularly.
Just, way too much torque for that small shaft.

Chopper
Keep it balanced! Knives do fly off at times. When doing knives, if only a few, buy extras.
Then install a new 1 directly opposite of the 1 that is missing. And use Locktite Red!
No experience with the Reddekopp chopper. This refers only to Case internal.
Give those chopper bearing a shot or 2 of grease every 50ish hours, when warm and in use. Do not overgrease, or bearings will fail.

DEF
Never let DEF freeze!! (stored totes). Keep out of sunlight.
Also, has, max, 2 year shelf life, if cared for.
On combines with DEF watch where you put your foot when climbing up on top. The DEF pump is mounted to the access steps. Easy to crack a line off by accident.

Hope this info helps all of you.
 

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Feeder chain sprocket shaft.
Never did myself, but, if older series requires 1, install 8010 shaft. It does NOT have that grease nipple. All that business is a internal non serviceable clutch. Never grease an existing 1 unless you are having slip issues. If still slipping, shaft needs replacing. Garbage design!
Are you talking about the grease fitting on the rock beater? Yes they used to recommend never greasing that nipple. Now however, it's on the service list because newer rock beaters have a passage drilled out in them and that nipple is how you grease the splines where the stub shaft sticks out of the gearbox. If you let that get dry the splines will wear excessively, even when aligned. Dealer just replaced my rock beater on a 7230 and the new beater requires annual greasing.
Chopper
I live in SE Saskatchewan, so no corn experience. However, never drop chopper in low! Unless you want to replace inner chopper shafts regularly.
Just, way too much torque for that small shaft.
Not sure what you're talking about there. Whether the chopper is in high or low, the speed and torque and on the inner shaft is unchanged. That inner shaft runs at the same speed (always powered by the large pulley) at all times and is what powers the tailings and clean grain augers and elevator. The speed setting of the chopper only affects the outer shaft. If anything runninng the chopper in low eliminates heat from the bearings between the chopper and that inner shaft since they won't be turning when in low. Provided you've dropped out the knives there's absolutely no issues with running the chopper in low when dropping straw. Not sure what was causing all those inner chopper shaft replacements you worked on.

I agree the shaft within a shaft arrangement is really problematic with all those bearings that heat and can go out easily. And those silly lock collars. And putting a chopper directly under the oil pan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well we bit the bullet this year and made the leap to a 9250. Coming from a 7088 and an 8120. From what I see here alot of you guys have experience with these machines. When it comes to heads we will be running a 40ft straight cut and if we swath it will be 36ft, it is a similar setup to our neighbours and they run 4 9250s. One concern that I had was going from 2 machines to one, however for our 3000ac we were told it would work. As for why a 9250, we deal alot with Hergott Farm Equipment here in Humboldt and I don't know it the have ever sold an 8250. The combine we ended up getting is from people that our partner knows through his off farm job. One thing I am glad is that it doesn't have a Redekop, imo all they do is suck extra power.
 

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We raise a lot of heavy straw crops in the area that are usually harvested with the straw on the green side and tough, even though often the grain will be dry. Chopper alone pulls major hp. Have tried 8 sized machines in the past we will definitely be sticking with the 9 sized combines especially for cereals. They pull through the heavy patches a lot better without having to be sitting on the edge of your seat. Especially useful while using the Auto Feedrate system (can't remember what case calls theirs). Canola rarely use the power though.
 
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