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I use a 9500 and 9600 to harvest my sunflowers. For as long as I have owned these two, the 9600 ends up with smoking, smoldering sunflower dust FAR more often than the 9500. Any ideas why? It looks like the smoldering begins with the dust accumulating on the edge of the turbocharger. This falls down and begins smoldering around the batteries. We run the 9500 in a similar manner using the same header and similar speeds, yet it rarely accumulates smoldering dust.
 

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Harvesting sunflowers creates lots of static electricity for some reason, we lost a combine from fire in SD several years ago, put a chain from the combine to the ground to act as an earthing strip, this should help the problem. also disconect the dust sucker on the feeder house, just acts as a big fire blower.
 

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Harvesting sunflower is perhaps one of any combine's most dangerous and literally death-defying jobs. I simply do not like that crop.


With that in mind, please be extra, extra careful when harvesting this stuff! Always carry at least two pressurized water sprayers on board, make sure there is a small amount of surfactant in that water, too. Keep the combine as clean as possible, too, even if that means stopping up to 3x daily to blow off!

There's just no room for error in sunflower, especially with a combine like yours with known "hot spots." More combines perish from fire in sunflower than any other crop, per capita. Coming through a sunflower harvest with a still-running combine, regardless of individual value, far, far outweighs the trouble and down time caused by meticulous, doting care of daily multiple cleanings.

Yes, resins in the plant, no matter how dry, are not only volatile, but do have a static-building property.

Take care, and I do wish both you and the 9600 to have a SAFE harvest!
 

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9600guy

We had the exact same problem with an N5 when it would get hot outside but our N6 never did it. We decided that the fan for some reason the fan wasnt blowing the chaff off the manifold. Maybe the radiator was constricting the air flow or the fan for some reason just wasnt pulling enough air, We never figured it out. Just something to think about.

Matt
 

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Chech with JD dealer there is a shield somewhere around the turbo that they remove when doing a greenlight inspection just because of this problem.We had them removed on 2 of our combines but I did not see what they even looked like.
 

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I'm not about much to do with Sunflowers, they wouldn't be anything like Chickpeas would they? Chickpea's are pretty wild to harvest, they'll just start smoulering randomly, there the reason most Gleaners burn in Central QLD *boom tish*

But yeah, whats the dust like from them? I'm keen to know why sunflowers (and chickpeas) are so much more flamable thensay wheat or Sorghum(milo)
 

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i just got done combining 700 acres of flowers with a 9650 and a 9750. they both did good till yesterday when the 9650 started smoldering and smoking. we drag chains on both of them and that seems to help some.

pete
 

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My experience with both the 9600 and 9500 are both just a prone to fires in flowers. The key is keep them clean. We have combined tens of thousands of acres of flowers with 7720, 8820, 9600 and 9610 and never had one fire. But we methodically blow them off completely every morning with special attention to the motor where the fires all start. The dust is so fuzzy and sticky and very fire prone and sticks to anything hot. It is common to find the turbo and the muffler and exhaust manifold covered with the dust by the end of the day. In extremely dry flowers and hot days we usually stop at least once in the middle of the day and will take our leaf blower and give the motor a quick cleaning. Also on the 9000 and 9010 series keep the the main power shaft tube clean( the one that runs under the hopper from the motor to the gearbox behind the cab) as this seems to be where the fires travel if ya get one. The hot material falls of the motor then into that dirty tube where it smolders and travels to the front and any place else it wants to. Another fella we combine for in SD carries a pair of leather welding gloves with him in his 9500 and from time to time puts them on and simply goes back and wipes off the muffler and turbo with the gloves during the day.
I know lots of people claim dragging a chain helps because it is static electricity that causes the fires. I think it is bs myself. We don't drag a chain and our experience speaks for itself. We have dragged chains if they came on the combine when we bought it but we never put them back on when they were off. One thing dragging the chain can help with though is it does seem to help keep the dust from sticking to the windshield quite as bad.
Also confection flowers seem to be less of a problem than oil flowers but both can easily burn your machine down if not kept clean.
 

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9600guy, this may be far fetched but I thought the 9500 bieng narrower machine had the radiator closer to the engine, maybe your getting more radiator fan air across the 9500 than the 9600 keeping the manifold cleaner. Safflower is similar to those conditions.
 

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Wheat Whacker, I cannot speak as much for the "static build-up" part, but as you pointed out, dragging a chain is definitely a ground, lest there would be more dust on the machine. More dust=more fires. The chains DO help on some of static/dust build-up. I aso believe just a combine's contact with the crop at the point of entry, is the chief ground for what would otherwise be deadly for the machine, as all its moving parts are static generators.

Yes, 8820's can and do burn down in flowers just as bad as any did in their day. I think fires are even more prevalent now with high-tech combines, than those of the 1970's and 1980's.

I remember a good 8820 that lost the fight, in the fall of 1992, in South Dakota, doing sunflowers.

Again, be very, very careful out there.
 
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