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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone ever tried retrofitting a later high-torque reverser on an older combine, such as putting a 9760 reverser on a 9610?

We would like to put an 8 row chopper corn head on our 9610. The current feederhouse drive is barely adequate for our current 8 row 30 inch non-chopping head. We have already removed the variable speed and installed a fixed drive for the lower belt, which helped keep the reverser cooler (I can hold my hand in it 5 seconds now, but before it was too hot to touch more than 1 or 2), but I hesitate to put a chopping head on it without some fix that is better. We have no cooler on it yet, have heard mixed reviews about coolers on the 9000/9010 reversers as to whether they are really very effective.

So, I am wondering about putting a better 60 series feederhouse drive drive on the combine. After looking at a newer combine, I think that extending the shaft (wider feederhouse on 9610) and mounting (3 point mount on 9760) wouldn't be big issues. However, the 60 series I believe shifts into reverse with a switch, 9610 with linkage--this could be more of a challenge unless one could attach the cable to the newer reverser.

Finally, to do it right it would seem you would also want to add the heavier 60 series drive belts--both upper and lower. So, does anyone also know if you can just replace the 10 series pulleys with 60 series without much trouble?

Any thoughts would be appreciated.
 

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do you run synthetic oil im it now? if not give it a try before anything else. i was amazed how much cooler my 7720 ran and i run an 8 row 30 head too.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the input.

We do run synthetic oil, this year we ran the new type of synthetic from JD specifically for the reverser boxes.

I think you are right about the cooler though, kinzepower. It can't hurt to have one on there.
 

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Do the cooler but anything beyond that would not be cost effective for an older combine. Save your money for an upgraded machine.
 

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I think the addition of the cooler has worked well for me, the gearbox runs warm but not hot and the oil life has been WAAAY better.

This is running an 893, jd knife rolls, and backshaft rpm in the 550-600 range.

jd
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks again guys. I think you're right, the cost would probably get a little high, greentech. My whole idea was concieved after seeing a nearly new 9760 burned up at nearby salvage yard. The front end was unburned, so got to thinking... Anyway, we plan to have a chopping head for next year and a combine probably a year or two later. I think we will add the cooler and run it.
 

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I agree, and would definitely add the cooler. We added the fix drive and the cooler to our 9650 and had no problems. We run a gerringhoff. You will however, have to change the pulley and belt on your bean head to get the sickle and auger to run at the right speed. It takes a little experimenting to get the right combination. We still have those parts if your interested for a 600 series head.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
toolman4: Thanks for the info. We have a 900 series head. We installed a fixed drive off a 9600 from a salvage yard. The drive actually runs the correct speed for the bean head. The JD specified platform speed is something like 500-520 feederhouse jack shaft rpm which is all the way slow for a variable speed (with correct belt tension) and that is the speed for a fixed drive. So, fortunately, we have no issues with the beanhead speed.

I am interested in any thoughts you have about the Gerringhoff, we are considering one. Are you happy with it? BTW-is your 9650 an STS or Walker?
 

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Our 9650 was a walker. It handled the gerringhoff really well. It actually felt like we had more power with our 9650 than our current 9660. We had some 20% corn towards the end this year and we could move faster with our 50 series walker in 20% corn last year. The gerringhoff is a great head. Doesn't take a lot of power, almost impossible to get it in the dirt on quick dips, and imop it does the best chopping out there. Its downfalls are: you have to stay spot on the row when the corn gets dryer because it tends to shake the plant hard when you get off the row and the ear will fall off before the head sometimes (depends on variety) more zerks to grease than others, It shells a little more when the corn gets dry. I think deere runs their newer heads faster now too so the shelling might be about the same. Gerringhoff knows about the ear drop problem in dryer corn and I actually used a prototype stripper plate that helped lessen the shake. If they would move the cutoff point back a foot into the head, the problem would be solved. Parts are fairly exspensive and when you have to replace the cutting discs it isn't very easy. You also have to reset the cuttoff knife about every 1000 acres which usually takes two people. Otherwise. it is a very well built head that does a really great job choppin.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks toolman4, it is interesting that you say that your 9650 Walker handled it better than your 9660 STS. This was a particular question on my mind, because we were thinking about eventually updating to a 9670 STS. I think it is because the STS just plain old takes more hp than walkers. Walkers do with gravity what rotors do with hp. I am not all that crazy about the extra maintainance of a Gerringhoff compared to other chopping heads, but it can't be anything like maintaining a stalk chopper you pull with a tractor (which is what we do now)! If it takes less hp, chops better and doesn't have the "windrow" problems of other chopping heads (which I've heard a lot about this year), then the drawbacks are overcome by the benefits and it would seem like a good choice to me. The only other possiblity for us at this point would be a Drago, which sounds like a good head for saving corn from header loss. With our fixed drive feederhouse speed at 500-520 rpm, would that be fast enough for the Gerringhoff in your experience? If not, can you change anything on the head to speed it up (like changing the sprockets on a JD 893)? Also, about how fast could your 9650 run with this head? I would like to think we could run it at least 4.5-5.0 mph on our 9610 (8 row 30"). Wishful thinking?
 

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Yep, the rotors take a lot of hp. In soybeans, the rotor definitely handles it better with less slugging and more volume as long as its sorting ok. In greener beans it seemed the walker did a better job threshing because it went through a smaller area. I know quite a few people that wish the 9660 had more ponies. We are going to chip ours next year with a chip that allows for different hp settings so we have power when we need it. With our walker we could combine at 4.5 to 5.0 pretty easy in 20% corn as long as it was sorting it out ok. The fixed drive, I think, took less hp also. The gerringhoff is very adjustable and the dealer will be able to match your jackshaft speed with the correct sprocket to spin the right rpm. I would aim for around 700rpm because it still does a good job with less shelling in dry stuff than the recommended 750rpms. We have a few people around here with dragos, some because they couldn't get a deere at the time, and they weren't happy with how well it chopped so take it for what its worth. The other thing, is sometimes you might want more or less trash coming in depending on speed and I don't know if you can control that with a drago. The only other thing for us, is in downed dry corn the head can sometimes pull the plant in so fast that the ear bangs into one of the snoots and falls off before its in. I don't have any other experience with the other chopping heads so I can't compare if this is typical. With the rotor, I slow the head down to about 600rpms or less, because I'm going slow anyway, and it pulls it in easier without jerking the ear off. The gathering chains on the gerringhoff also don't extend out as far away from the head on as our old 693, so it doesn't pick the downed stuff quite as well either. Just some things Ive noticed and we don't have anymore corn in our beans in the spring than the deere or other heads when we've had downed corn. Our head did windrow with all the trash this year, but it was an even windrow across the field with a lot of fluff. This year I liked to wait a few days for the fluff to settle some and then hit it with the ripper so it made the ground a little blacker.
 

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I run a 9650W and added the oil cooler. The addition made a big difference. Kinze is wrong about no moving parts. The reverser needs an oil pump added. The reverser is machined internally (at least on the 50 series) to accept the gears.

The biggest problem I have found on the reverser getting hot is actually insufficient grease for the lower sheave. The sheave needs grease every day, at least 5 pumps both zerks.

Deere just uses a short single key to drive the outer sheave half. The key will pound out the keyway and then doesn't allow the cam to tighten the outer sheave under load. This belt slippage adds a lot of the heat to the reverser.

A new cam kit and outer sheave runs about $1400 from deere, but there is a better option. If you are taking your combine down for maintenance this winter, check the cam and keyway. I would expect you could get a local machine shop to recut the keyway to 5/16 or 3/8, and recut the keyseat in the cam for a longer key. I would expect this to cost in the $300-$400 range and would actually give you a better, longer lasting part than the factory deere parts. The only reason for the high cost is the cam is hardened, so cutting the keyseat is no easy task. Do not allow the machine shop to cut an additional keyway in the sheave, or the grease hole will not line up.
 
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