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Have you ever changed the front auger bed bearings on a 9650sts??
What a Job!!
Anybody have any tips on how to do the???

combine has 1900 separator hours on.

Looks like the hard red wheat will start middle of next week. Have a 1040 acres to put through this baby this year.

I'm from around Stratford Ontario.
 

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Well, Ive seen the setup before and it looks similar to my walker machines so if this Helps,,,,, First remove the drive shaft or cross shaft, drive out all the roll pins holding the spider gears on, zip off all the nuts, remove the bolts and bolt spacers, knock off the outer flange, remove all the locking collars, get a good ball pein hammer not too heavy, crack off all the outer races of the bearings leaving the inner races on the shaft, at this point the inner flange will come free, get a 3/8 drive impact and a 8" posilock puller and grab each inner race and zip them off, Usally takes me about an Hour to do the hole setup including re assembly, the key is the right tools and no need for a torch. Note the use of a not so heavy ball pein is to bust the outer race which is brittle without bending the shaft, flick of the rist persay. I learned quickley to bust outer races first then pull inner ones or worst case cut inner races, this works on nearly all bearings on our machines. Good luck.
 

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Well, the cross shaft on an STS only comes out after the wheel is taken off and the bearings cut.
You can make yourself a little room by taking the LH drive shaft off. You can even pull the stub and the brake drum off the transmission. I never take the cross shaft out. At first I loosen the lock collars by loosening the set screw with an allen wrench, then turning the collar a little with an air hammer. Then I take the rolled pin out of the sprockets. For this I have a rolled pin punch that fits my air hammer. I take all the nuts of and push the bolts inside the auger bed and let the spacers fall out. Now I loosen the bearing holders at the rear end of the shoe augers. That way I can push the augers inside far enough to drop the sprocket, the lock collar and the front bearing flange. I push the augers forward again and cut all the bearings with a torch. There is no room to swing a ball pein hammer, at least not for me. I use my air hammer to push the auger inside again and by this striping the remaining bearing race of the shaft. But be carefull and don't swell the shaft while hammering. With an emri cloth I shine the shafts, apply antiseize and install the new bearings. This procedure takes me several hours on an STS.

The STS with its capacity has to handle much more grain than a 9600. The load is divided only onto 4 augers versus 7 on the old walker machine, but JD still uses the same bearing. That's why they hardly last more than a thousand hours and often get replaced long before.
 

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It is nothing like a walker machine when looking at getting to the bearings.


Ralf pretty much covered it.
I use a puller to pull the whole auger bearing off, no torching or beating. I do pull the cross shaft because a lot of times the drive gears are loose and wear the shaft.
The cross shaft will come out if you have axle extensions with duals. Loctite the drive gears and keys on the shaft when reassembeling. Check the auger gears for looseness on the auger shaft. Chances if they are loose, the hole in the auger for the spring pin is deformed. That means auger replacement.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't own a combine that uses a bed of conveyor augers for transporting threshed grain to its cleaning system. There is too much downside to them vs. any benefit.
 

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My Walker machines get these bearings every two seasons and they give me absolutley no problem between services. I dont see how the remark on an STS and all of its grand capacity has anything to do with how to change bearings. Not to get into a pissing match Ralf but if your STS has the same size head in the same conditions as my Walker how is it going to have to handle more grain. Or are you just speaking in terms of the 4 augers versus 7, having to manage the same amount of material? Thanks but no thanks Muddy,, we run green for a reason....
 

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Just trying to help Cliflyn,, I was NOT trying to tell you specifically how to change the bearings on your particular machine but to state how I do it which is the easiest way possible that I know of. Sometime seeing or picturing how others carry out repairs reveals new methonds, or atleast that has always helped me, again just trying to help, good luck.
 

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davedan

As you self wrote the STS has to carry the grain with only four augers versus seven on the walker machine. Plus the STS has more capacity. It you put the same size header on it as on your walker and go and cut wheat you will travel at a higher ground speed.
On top of that, from talking to the operators, STS owners go over more acres than walker machine owners.
Besides wearing out the bearings much quicker, I often find the hole for the rolled pin, that holds the sprocket run out. Then the auger has to be replaced. I've never seen this on a walker machine.
 

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Ive ran with STS machines in the same conditions with same yeilds using a late model walker and the STS could not travel any faster without increase loss. Horsepower does not mean capacity. Any machine now days can travel and feed grain faster than it can seperate in most high yield conditions do you agree? What I mean is that any combine can be pushed to the limit of horsepower and cylinder capacity in a four ton wheat crop but it takes certain limited ground speeds to clean and seperate the material correctly, and I have yet to see a rotor machine do more with the same crop and not have increase loss.
 

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Well, the cross shaft on an STS only comes out after the wheel is taken off and the bearings cut.
You can make yourself a little room by taking the LH drive shaft off. You can even pull the stub and the brake drum off the transmission. I never take the cross shaft out. At first I loosen the lock collars by loosening the set screw with an allen wrench, then turning the collar a little with an air hammer. Then I take the rolled pin out of the sprockets. For this I have a rolled pin punch that fits my air hammer. I take all the nuts of and push the bolts inside the auger bed and let the spacers fall out. Now I loosen the bearing holders at the rear end of the shoe augers. That way I can push the augers inside far enough to drop the sprocket, the lock collar and the front bearing flange. I push the augers forward again and cut all the bearings with a torch. There is no room to swing a ball pein hammer, at least not for me. I use my air hammer to push the auger inside again and by this striping the remaining bearing race of the shaft. But be carefull and don't swell the shaft while hammering. With an emri cloth I shine the shafts, apply antiseize and install the new bearings. This procedure takes me several hours on an STS.

The STS with its capacity has to handle much more grain than a 9600. The load is divided only onto 4 augers versus 7 on the old walker machine, but JD still uses the same bearing. That's why they hardly last more than a thousand hours and often get replaced long before.
What is the number of the bearing
 

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It isnt much more work to drop the transmission and it will give you much more room to work.
These bearings were probably the worst things to work on on those combines.
 
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