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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There were some who wanted to see the 970 with a belt pickup. These are common up here where we are. I don't know about further south though. The last field of wheat had fallen over from rain and wind so we swathed it one day and combined it the next. We took the drapers off and put the belt pickups back on. Which is how they are stored for the winter anyway. Plus one other picture that I didn't post before.










In this last one it's not snowing or raining just a dirty window on the truck.
 

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Very Nice. We swathed some every year as well. Sure miss the farm though. Guess Ill have to come up and run one of your combines next year..and then go over and help Nathan figure his out


Thanks for the pics.
Dusty
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
We found out from the dealer that there is an adjustment to bring the concave up tighter with the rotors. The machine goes back for an after harvest checkover so they can make the change then. He also said you can get an even longer auger extension. With a few of these changes, we might like it better than the Deere. Except the draper, JD ahead there. easier changing back and forth from transport and more offset on right side.
 

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Excellent pictures 9860 JD, very interesting. Here in my part of the world (Tasmania, Australia) not alot of grain is swathed, it is mostly grass seeds & canola.

Regards,

TC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
We don't usually swath much wheat. This was our last field and the weather was turning. The wheat was down and the soil sticky so the drapers would probably been pushing alot of dirt. We always cut the canola. I've seen strong wind shatter the pods in standing ripe canola. If the crop is thick enough some say it can be left and cut straight.
 

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Quote:We don't usually swath much wheat. This was our last field and the weather was turning. The wheat was down and the soil sticky so the drapers would probably been pushing alot of dirt. We always cut the canola. I've seen strong wind shatter the pods in standing ripe canola. If the crop is thick enough some say it can be left and cut straight.


some people say if you spray roundup it makes the pods more resistant against shattering, we tried it last year in a part of a straight cut field (Alta Canada) and it seemed to work the yield was slightly higher
it was liberty link canola and seemed to get a little kill) cause the stubble was dead against green in the unsprayed
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I guess our other reason for swathing canola is that once it is cut down, we can leave it and go harvest the wheat. The canola won't deteriorate in the swath and we like to get the wheat off in as good of condition as possible.
 

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Do you ever get any trouble with wind with swathed canola? I guess it would be a fairly robust swath (compared to something like peas).

Guys here have had trouble with swathed peas, blowing acroos the paddock like tumble weeds. A guy was telling me the other day that he had trouble with a windrowed chinese cabbage seed crop (similar to canola) a few years agao, where the wind caused alot of damage (blew the stuff across the paddock & as a result the pods shattered & dropped alot of seed).

Regards,

TC.
 

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it depends how much and how long stubble you have
if you have long stubble and not too thin, normal wind does not cause
problems but if you get lots of wind, the smath will be everywhere

you can also use a swath roller behind the windrower but then
then swath might be compacted and does not get dry as fast
after it got rained on
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Up here you have to either pick up the pea swaths right behind the swather or else cut them with the straight headers (preferably a flex header for shaving the ground.) If you fart behind the swather, pea swaths will scatter. We often cut the canola in a South East to North West direction instead of a clockwise round. Any strong winds that could scatter the swaths always come from the northwest so by pointing the swaths into the wind you can avoid scattering and shelling. I realize I have lots of combine pictures but nothing with the swather. I'll fix that come this August. And some of the new 9620 pulling the air drill.
 
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