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Anyone have any experience comparing a 9760STS vs. a CAT Lexion 580 in wheat and corn? A neighbor of mine has a 580 and swears by it, but I can't believe it is superior to the 9760.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
He likes the capacity and the speed which he can move through the field, but other than that, his reasoning is pretty vague. The latest model Deere he has run has been a 9610.
 

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How about a friendly, neighborly duel between the two combines? Both of you need to agree to do so many acres or hours in one of his fields as well as vice versa on your ground. I think by the hour is more even since BOTH combines will be running in both places. have your men ready with your trucks, tractors, carts and fuel supply. he will have his. Divide the land by starting on either side of the field so as not to get in each others' way.

While truck drivers may keep their own scores by stop watches and watching loads, I say the real proof is the elevator scale tickets.

Again, this is not to prove either combine is "better" than the other, but rather an honest test of their overall capacity and for ensure such honesty, I would suggest two unbiased witnesses, one in each combine to keep track of ground speeds, yield monitors, losses and other such functions.

In all, it sounds like the two of you could end up having a great deal of fun out of the deal as well as a chance for other interested persons to just hang out and watch a couple of the best combines in the world do their thing!
 

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In all, it sounds like the two of you could end up having a great deal of fun out of the deal....

Or all out WAR...

He goes out the next morning and your tires are flat on your combne haha
 

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Quote:In all, it sounds like the two of you could end up having a great deal of fun out of the deal....

Or all out WAR...

He goes out the next morning and your tires are flat on your combne haha



Hey now, be careful about saying such things. No one is trying to pass out any bad ideas or suggest sabotage here! I for one, have NO tolerance for sabotage of any kind, period!


I said to have a friendly contest, and by that, I mean just THAT! I believe it can all be kept fair and square for both sides and is a very nice way to also show off your yields also. Make a regular field day out of the event.
 

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[quote author=combiness board=JD thread=1143554394 post=1143562385]How about a friendly, neighborly duel between the two combines? Both of you need to agree to do so many acres or hours in one of his fields as well as vice versa on your ground. I think by the hour is more even since BOTH combines will be running in both places. have your men ready with your trucks, tractors, carts and fuel supply. he will have his. Divide the land by starting on either side of the field so as not to get in each others' way.

While truck drivers may keep their own scores by stop watches and watching loads, I say the real proof is the elevator scale tickets.

Again, this is not to prove either combine is "better" than the other, but rather an honest test of their overall capacity and for ensure such honesty, I would suggest two unbiased witnesses, one in each combine to keep track of ground speeds, yield monitors, losses and other such functions.

In all, it sounds like the two of you could end up having a great deal of fun out of the deal as well as a chance for other interested persons to just hang out and watch a couple of the best combines in the world do their thing!
[/quote

During most combine demos I have found that to most STS owners "ignorance is bliss." I suggest taking an auger cart with scales or a weigh wagon and measuring the amount of grain that each combine collects during a simple round within the same crop and field. Each combine must have the same size header and be operated normally. I witnessed a Lexion 580 in the same field as an 8010 doing this very same test and at a minimum the 8010 had 600 lbs less grain harvested per round than the Lexion and the as high as 1500 lbs less harvested in the same field and crop, uisng the same size, type and brand header (MacDon 30' draper) and operating at comparable ground speeds. Where did the difference go on the 8010? The ground didn't look much different from pass to pass, the Lexion did have much less on the ground. I just could never have immagined that big of a difference and there were too many dealer and factory folks from both sides around eagerly watching for any sabotage to be taking place.
 

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For cerial grains, the only proper way to do a combine test is to dump all the material coming out the back of a combine on to a screen that you throw under the machine running at full capacity. You will have to make sure that the spreaders are disconnected and all the material is collected. The take a set of elevator screens and separate the material. This way you will find the cracks, and all the small kernals. Once you have eliminated everything that is not considered dockage, weigh it on a gram scale and to the appropriate calculations. You will then have an actual comparison between combine performance.

Once you have the combine loss, then throw a one foot square behind the header to determine header loss. Count the kernals, and compare it to standing crop. In our area of Canada, I like to see 10 - 20 lbs per acre max in cerial crops.

In my work, I do this all the time, on every combine that I set. This is a very useful tool in setting combines, as you have eliminated all guesswork and have a truthful comparison. I get called out by many operators in harvest to come and "throw the screen" as they want to know what is really happening behind their machine. It is simply amazing what people will leave on the ground without knowing it!
 

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Quote:
Quote:

I suggest taking an auger cart with scales or a weigh wagon and measuring the amount of grain that each combine collects during a simple round within the same crop and field. Each combine must have the same size header and be operated normally. I witnessed a Lexion 580 in the same field as an 8010 doing this very same test and at a minimum the 8010 had 600 lbs less grain harvested per round than the Lexion and the as high as 1500 lbs less harvested in the same field and crop, uisng the same size, type and brand header (MacDon 30' draper) and operating at comparable ground speeds. Where did the difference go on the 8010? The ground didn't look much different from pass to pass, the Lexion did have much less on the ground. I just could never have immagined that big of a difference and there were too many dealer and factory folks from both sides around eagerly watching for any sabotage to be taking place.

There's too many variables in that experiment for it to be accurate. Fertilizer application could be overlapped, soils change, and the drill could throw more and less seed out pass to pass. I'd throw that experiment right out the window. Bushels per hour is what matters.
I've watched the yield monitor flucuate more than 10bpa pass to pass in our wheat fields and more than that in corn.


Ahhh, ignorance is bliss wouldn't you say? Actually, this kind of test, when replicated up to 3 times or more is the most logical, espeically when using a corn head. Replicating minimizes the variable effect to an acceptable margin of error and using a corn head takes out the guess work. Try it sometime with your neighbor, even if the machines are the same, you'll find out who can set their combine better. When talking variables, what's on the ground isn't always an accurate guesstimation. For example, the internal choppers on CaseIH and Gleaner combines skew actual grain loss, the self-leveling cleaning shoe in the AFX, CX and CR combines can localize loss. Ground speed is a huge factor. Using real world operators, settings, etc. results in real world results.
 

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I agree with MX

There is no Good way of telling

Heck like he said if a sensor was off a bit..or they read differently then it could be showing wrong and there's just way to many variables

overall i just look at what the acres an hour is and if the sample looks good and if so then im one happy guy

For some people they can run a green combine and do just fine for others they can't get a green combine to work at all.....

Same goes for Case and lexion(cat)

Chevy Vehicles for us are so bulletproof and great (not to mention saved my life) and whenever we tried a ford
it was the biggest pos weve ever seen

it just doesn't work for us

So if you have something and it works stay with it!!!!!!
 

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Quote:I agree with MX

There is no Good way of telling

Heck like he said if a sensor was off a bit..or they read differently then it could be showing wrong and there's just way to many variables

overall i just look at what the acres an hour is and if the sample looks good and if so then im one happy guy

For some people they can run a green combine and do just fine for others they can't get a green combine to work at all.....

Same goes for Case and lexion(cat)

Chevy Vehicles for us are so bulletproof and great (not to mention saved my life) and whenever we tried a ford
it was the biggest pos weve ever seen

it just doesn't work for us

So if you have something and it works stay with it!!!!!!


Loss isn't a concern to you? A combine should be set based upon acceptable loss. That's why the Deere's Throughput Control System didn't catch on - in order for it to optimize the performance of an STS, the STS had to go at a rate slower than most are willing to accept, so everyone opted for acres per hour vs. a compromise of productivity and quality performance (Deere really needs a bigger cleaning shoe!!!).

As far as variables go, forget about them and go with a no nonsense approach. Use the same calibrated weigh wagon your seed guy used to calibrate you yieldmonitor with and operate normally - it doesn't get any easier than that. Aruging about variables is blissful ignorance. Most who say "it won't work for them" won't let it work for them!
 

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Quote:It's cheaper to run a combine that is set poorly and loosing 2% of your crop, than it is to run slower and have it set to loose 1%. Combine hours aren't cheap. Bushels per hour is where it's at.

Spoken like a true snot nosed "green" territory rep., those who insist on quantifying grain loss rather than trying to do a good job. I doubt very seriously that you will get many to buy into your theory, from academic minds to your grandad. But it is an entertaining thought. Might be worth a shot to convince a fellow farmer to try if you want to take is rented land because he did such a poor job. I don't think my landlords would see much humor in me following your guidelines and I doubt yours do either. Good luck with your 2%. Food for thought: 1 acre = 43,560 sq. ft.; you plant 28,000 - 33,5000 kernals per acre (either way that's less than one kernal per acre) and you are willing to leave up to 20 behind per sq. ft @ 180 bu. where 7 kernals = 1 bu.? I know its not relative to the ROI gained from an ear of corn, but it does make you wonder. I try to get as close to that first kernal as I can...it puts mor emoney inmy pocket. But you stick with your 2% loss, i'll put my 2% in the bank.
 

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I will pick bushels per hour. you are taking 1% as a farmer I cant see making a big deal over 1%. If I can pick up 1 MPH more but lose that 1% you are talking about then I am going for the MPH because that will save me a lot of money on Seperater hours. Last I checked on 150 bu. corn 1% is 1.5 bu. @ 2.50=3.75 and 2%is 3 [email protected] 2.50=7.50 Seperater hours Last I checked were around that $60 mark makes sence to me. But afterall I am just a Fellow Farmer
 

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the STS had to go at a rate slower than most are willing to accept, so everyone opted for acres per hour vs. a compromise of productivity and quality performance (Deere really needs a bigger cleaning shoe!!!).


Well that answer's the main question

If you want what most people want and thats

Quality and Bushels and hour......

and if you pay the company by the combine's hours

get a CAT

(i would say case but he's looking at cat or deere)

So i hope that you go find you a yellow combine and have great luck

if not

Try out case
 

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Quote:the STS had to go at a rate slower than most are willing to accept, so everyone opted for acres per hour vs. a compromise of productivity and quality performance (Deere really needs a bigger cleaning shoe!!!).


Well that answer's the main question

If you want what most people want and thats

Quality and Bushels and hour......

and if you pay the company by the combine's hours

get a CAT

(i would say case but he's looking at cat or deere)

So i hope that you go find you a yellow combine and have great luck

if not

Try out case





I have two Lexions: 485 and 575R.
 

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Cool

have you had good luck with them

we run two 2388

what year are yours..and how well is your dealer support

here in southern ill CAT's not very popular because of lack of service..is way up north

And we have a dealer 45 min away that has just been great to us...

so we are very lucky

are you guys doing anything right now

or setting around watching it rain and the wind blow
 

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My 485 is a '99 model and the 575R is an '05. Like all machinery, for the majority they are only as good as the maintenance you provide. The 485 has been a solid performer with an incredible appetite. It has given 7 trouble free seasons. I bet I haven't spent $10K on it in those 7 years. It is our main corn combine, equipped with a mauer bin extension which takes it up to about 350 bu. The 575R was new last fall and is used for beans only. I runs with a 36' MacDon but will have a 35 foot lexion flex head on it this coming season. I demoed the lexion 35' Maxflex header and it is the smoothest running flex head I have ever been around, hands above the draper. In fact, my neighbor wants to trade his Hydra flex for one to run on his 9760. My dealer is a little over an hour away, but they have a regional service technician for general ag 10 mi. away and an Ag Chem/gen. ag technician two miles away. I also have a seasonal parts box provided through an on farm parts program offerd by the manufacturer and I am able to customize it with those parts that I know and/or think I will need. It's a great program, something others manufacturers should offer, no matter if they are close or not, it's worth it.
 
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