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Discussion Starter #1
The high capacity feed package gives you several things. First, you get a higher speed for the feeder chain. The feeder chain is also now a U-slat (first for 2007). The feed accelerator runs faster on both the low side and the high side. The feed acclerator on the high capacity package is the same as they use on the rice machines. The most obvious thing is that the wear strips (a lot of guys call them paddles) are shorter, there are more of them, and they are cast. The supports that they bolt to are stronger too. And actually, if you order a small grain machine, you can order this high capacity feed package.

The other big difference is the chopper. The higher horsepower is to compensate for it. It is an Extra Fine Cut chopper...more knives on the rotor, more stationary knives...and they are evenly spaced for a more uniform cut. This is completely unique to the Premium machine in North America...the only way to get it is to order a Premium.

Pretty much everything else that is standard with a Premium, you can option up to on regular machines. It is just that the Premium machine is just that...Premium, so you don't have the ability to "option it down" and make it a bare-bones machines.
 

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I would not think that you would want the straw cut after the sickle anyway. Its easier to seperate if its intact. Serrated probable grabs the crop mat and passes it easier. Ive never heard of the custom cutter special combines. What aobut them makes them a better or worse package?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm with you on that. The more intact the straw and heads are going into the rotor, the cleaner your sample is going to be and the more capacity the machine will have. The high capacity feed package is mostly to "comb" through the tangled windrows and get everything lined up better going into the rotor.

Most custom cutters start in wheat and end up in corn and beans. The custom cutter package comes with both small wire and round bar concaves... The small wires come in the machine from the factory and the round bars are shipped with the machine in crates. You also get high wear parts for grain handling and for the separator.
 

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Was thumbing through a john deere sts catalog the other day, and at the back there was a part that said they have a version of the 9860 that has higher horsepower (420) and a extra capacity feederhouse. Harvestsmart and gps guidance are also part of the package. My question is when they mention a serrated feed accelerator. I take it the serrated feed xcellerator helps cut straw before entering the rotor.
They also say it has high wear grain handling components (augers,etc.) Keep in mind that this isn't a custom cutter special as I checked Deere's website it's different. The website says it is really for heavy windrowed crops and high yielding small grains like wheat. says it's NOT for corn or regular harvesting like corn beans etc. etc. Anyone have any more info on it than deere gives especially about the serrated feed accelerator (obviously most of them aren't serrated).
 

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Thanks a lot big hammer you definently know your stuff. I wonder if you could get the high hp for a corn and bean version????
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sometimes more horsepower is better...sometimes not so much. Conditions determine the need, and the way I see it unless you're in hills, mud, wide windrows, or running a chopping head, it is hard to use all the horsepower. To each their own...but I think we'll continue to ask manufacturers for more ponies.
 

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Quote:Sometimes more horsepower is better...sometimes not so much. Conditions determine the need, and the way I see it unless you're in hills, mud, wide windrows, or running a chopping head, it is hard to use all the horsepower. To each their own...but I think we'll continue to ask manufacturers for more ponies.

You know that horsepower on class seven and eight combines runs between $550 - $750 / horsepower. I don't think I would be asking for something that expensive unless I knew I was going to be using it.
 

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Quote:Thanks a lot big hammer you definently know your stuff. I wonder if you could get the high hp for a corn and bean version????


With the STS's already limited cleaning shoe capacity (and occasionally being separation limited too) in high volume crops, and often times sensitive to lite crops too, on the 340 hp and 375 hp versions, how could a 420 hp version possibly be of any benefit to a corn and soybean grower? Wouldn't the additional horsepower compound the grain loss effects? I view the STS premium as a small grains only combine due partly to: 1) its fine-cut Euro style chopper, which requires significantly more power and likely minimal performance advantages in corn and soybeans over domestic all-crop versions; 2) the addition of the high-speed impeller and feeder house drive (beyond that of typical equipment), which you would not want in corn and often times soybeans. And, that $30,000 higher price tag doesn't look to have enough value packed in it when all your getting is 10% more power, a fine-cut chopper (that's obviously going to wear faster than normal in corn, be more costly to service and likely use all that additional power) and an atypical feeder house drive and impeller drive, none of which are the STS's true limiting factors. Well, the feeder house drive is a limiting factor mainly in corn with larger, more power consuming heads.


* Fact based on specification comparison and simple trend analysis, not opinion.
 

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Quote:Muddy, you hate John Deere, so why are you talking about John Deere. Tom.

I have never said I hate anything!

I have tried a lot of machinery over the years and I have found that satisfaction does not come from purchasing machinery that best fits my farm, but rather is the best piece of machinery for the job (my farm), no matter its price.

Deere makes some good products. I would actually like to have one of their new 4730 sprayers but I don't want to mix precision farming systems (i.e., Greenstar with Ag Leader) so I have to look else where. I also have a 4020 and a 6030, which are my toys, with chrome, turbos, the works and they aren't pulling tractors either.

I don't buy in to, nor comforted by the whole "Solid, Stable, Still John Deere promo." It wouldn't matter to me who Deere or any other brand sold out to as long as they would have the best machinery for the job / my farm I would buy it. Heritage concerns me little, farming is not the same today as it was 40 years ago and neither is the equipment type and brand. A lot of machinery is still bought today based upon personal preference over whether it will actually do the job most effectively. Brand is a big influencer. Things I don't consider are resale value (that's what depreciation is for) and any price that is not per acre.
 

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I have said it before and I will say it again. If you show me a company like Kinze who specializes in virtually one aspect (planters ) I'll show you the best planter money can buy. Kinze planters perform, are really SIMPLE to use and maintain, and will plant as good as anything can. besides fixing leaky cylinders and taking links out of chains I can't remember the last thing that flat out broke on it and cost me downtime. I'd really like to see Case IH take over the combines. And watch Deere focus even more on their tractors and engines (their strong points.) And Kinze will be the only planter I will ever own no matter what. If Kinze went out tomorrow I would call my prescision planter guy and order two sets of everything for the meters. (everything else about them is cake. And I would probably plant with it till the frame was pure rust... I know it would still be performing. The only thing I really hold against JD is how they have way too many irons in the fire. Don't get me wrong people I'm not color predjudice at all. GPS guidance in our area doesn't do anybody much good ( hills, and virtually no straight lines.) I've tried it and
I'm with you Muddy whatever gets the job done best no matter what color. And KUDOS on the whole $$$$ per acre thing. There aren't any equipment manufacturers who still speak that language.
 

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Quote:I have said it before and I will say it again. If you show me a company like Kinze who specializes in virtually one aspect (planters ) I'll show you the best planter money can buy. Kinze planters perform, are really SIMPLE to use and maintain, and will plant as good as anything can. besides fixing leaky cylinders and taking links out of chains I can't remember the last thing that flat out broke on it and cost me downtime. I'd really like to see Case IH take over the combines. And watch Deere focus even more on their tractors and engines (their strong points.) And Kinze will be the only planter I will ever own no matter what. If Kinze went out tomorrow I would call my prescision planter guy and order two sets of everything for the meters. (everything else about them is cake. And I would probably plant with it till the frame was pure rust... I know it would still be performing. The only thing I really hold against JD is how they have way too many irons in the fire. Don't get me wrong people I'm not color predjudice at all. GPS guidance in our area doesn't do anybody much good ( hills, and virtually no straight lines.) I've tried it and
I'm with you Muddy whatever gets the job done best no matter what color. And KUDOS on the whole $$$$ per acre thing. There aren't any equipment manufacturers who still speak that language.


Sounds like a great concept (sounds like communist Russia actually, they only had one primary manufacturer for combines and one for tractors, etc.) but, without competition from other manufacturers, technology would become extremely slow to evolve and customers would quickly become disgusted.

If your looking for a combine manufacturer whose majority business is combines like planters are to Kinze, that's CLAAS. That's part of the reason I run Lexions. I know that combines and harvesting technology are their speciality and they do it very well (that's why they sell more combines world-wide, than any other manufacturer).
 

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Operaider,

I have to agree 100% with you on the Kinze's. We have a 2600 16 row we have used for probably 10 years. Dirt simple and low maintenance are its huge pluses.
The way it lifts and rotates 90 degrees to give you a 12' transport width was ingenious but it worried us when it was new. We have folded and unfolded it thousands of times, and it has not given one single problem.
 

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I agree with the technology part kind of.... Well not really because one company comes up with it and everybody else finds a way to put a spin on it and act like they just pulled it out the blue clear sky. When company's such as john deere say "let em invent it and work the bugs out of it so we can make it better." See that's where they lose me, It just doesn't speak volumes for their engineering department. Show up at the end of the battle and take credit for the victory... At the local farm show this winter a deere salesman was trying to convince me that their lawn mowers were as good as it gets. He obviously hadn't been around and looked at others like "BAD BOY" mowers. Those bad boys are BAD BOYS pun intended. There are certain things like balers that you are just better off going with a big company on because of R&D. They can throw money at it until its right. Most smaller companies can't keep up with their spending. I had a turbo out once that was only a couple years old. And we split it up Deere paid part then Dealer paid part then I paid part. Even though it was out of warranty. They don't want to piss a good customer off over (CHUMP CHANGE). Who else would do that
???? However companies like bad boy (prime example) obviously if you are reading this you should look up BAD BOY MOWERS on the net. A company that builds nothing more than one of the baddest a** grass whackers of all time. I don't know how they could make it any better without complicating its simplicity. It's just an opinion that I will thank KINZE for. They made a beleiver out of me. I think lexion is definently atop the combines But they all cost too much $$$ and I don't think they can do it that much faster than something a little smaller and way cheaper. That can flow with the support equipment instead of plugging it solid in the first half hour of the day and pretty much never running it for 5 continuous minutes for the rest of the day. you can't justify the cost for the few days it may gain you in the harvest if you gain anything much at all. Then park more than $300,000 in the barn for at least 8-9 mos. No way. I don't care who were talking about the kind of money they want for some of these new combines is just plain crazy. $300 G's @ 5% interest in a low risk CD would yield somewhere around $15,000 a year in interest. Especially considering how much support equipment it takes to keep up. And they burn a considerably bigger amount of fuel (especially in a whole season.) The base price of the 9860 Premium starts out @ like 311,000 dollars and there is probably another 20-? more thousands of dollars you can add in options. In all honesty who out there (except for a large cutter) can dare say they pay that much for a new combine yearly and trade off every season??????? Like most everybody else I wish That's the way I could have it. I don't believe people get that wealthy by spending like that. Sorry for my rant The cost of new machinery is definently a sore spot for me.... Even If I could afford it I don't think I would do it. Ask an oldtimer who is still farming and you'll hear a different version of what I just said. They become obsolete as fast as computers do now days too.... (70 series) is in the oven
 

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If you think about it, and you are familiar with the 500 series lexions. It is basically a conventional Deere on the front and has a NH twin rotors a$$. That shares the work load. Threshing done in the front and more seperation in the back. The bullet rotor helps rifle a new spin on an axial-flow design that is a spitting image. I'll meet you in the middle on this one muddy... It would get pretty boring if they weren't feeding off each others designs and concepts and trying to beat someone at their own game. Without competition nothing would ever progress for sure. But The world has became a little more "ruthless" in its ways, especially in corporate america. Imagine when Dr. James Naismith (the inventor of basketball) was ejected from a game while coaching about a rule.........OF A GAME HE WROTE THE RULE BOOK ON.... it probably went something like this
 
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