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Guys and gals, I'd appreciate some input on this scenario: I have a customer looking at buying a low houred (under 500 sep. hrs.) STS combine. He thinks he wants a 9860, but we are comparing that model of combine against a 9760. He will be combining wheat (mostly dryland with some irrigated) and then harvesting corn (200-240 bushel/acre) and milo in the fall. His ground is very flat. My question is: will the performance/capacity of the 9860 be enough in those harvesting conditions to justify buying a 9860 over a 9760? Any and all input would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 

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Depending on the price differance, but I cannot see the value/benefit in a 9860. But before spending large amounts of capital on depreciating steel, I would advise you to work out the TOTAL COSTS of ownership & operation, including return on investment, then way that up against the cost of getting a custom cutter in to do the job. Afterall, they are 100% tax deductable. The only thing tax deductable on your machine on your farm is interest & repairs & maintenance. You don't really want any of those.
 

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Same machine, horse power is the only difference as far as I can tell. The rotor drive will not handle any more power than a 9760 puts out.

He can puff his chest out and say he owns a class 8 machine is the only advantage I can see.
 

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I need more info (acreage amounts of each crop) what size head is going to be utilized. I agree with harsh... The only reason I could see the 9860 having an advantage is really tough crop conditions, or trying to cover a lot of ground in a short time. I wasn't aware the rotor drive was a weak link but it doesn't surprise me.
 

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went to the dealer today and I was
to see 9860's and 9760's on their lots in this area of the country you are average in the 500-2000 acre range and there are fewer guys who farm from 2000-3000 acres and virtually not very many at all who farm more than 3000 acres. Anybody who farms more than 3000 acres around here is nothing more than self serving greed on wheels a large field here is 80-1XX acres. and some fields are no larger than an acre or two. Typically the more acres somebody farms around here the more diversified they are in raising a variety of crops other than corn and beans. I think the main reason is the dealership is pretty close to a large city and there are some pretty suburban farmers who would OWN a 9860 with a 35ft head and farm less than 2000 acres. Most of these types had (or at least their families) farms where the city was built and they have been moved once or twice due to highway projects or just "Urban Sprawl. It's a pretty raw deal to have your farm bought from you for what it's worth and then have it replaced in full at no cost to you just for the inconvinience of moving. Then you can run a 9860 for your 1000 acre garden. and then have to move again!!! dam the luck
 

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I know this is straying from topic, but in reply to what you just stated, an even worse case scenario can be seen throughout north central Texas, pretty much all the way to the southern outskirts of OKC. Yes, that's basically a 200 mile strectch of geography. Once prime farm or even pasture land, if it's not being bought for outright develepment [i.e. urban sprawl] it's all those danged horse farms!

This is just driving the "value" of land way out of reach for any wannabe farmer or stockman, who does not want to breed/sell quarter horses.
 

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Why get a larger combine when the smaller one can do the work???

If our 2388 with a draper ...well lets call it a class 6 combine can cut 50 bushel beans going around 5 mph or 5.5 and its pushing a 36ft draper head and the sample is clean to your likeing

Why do i need to shell out alot more money for a class 7 or 8?

Also u are running a 8 row corn head so your getting along just great with your corn heads as well..


I know everyone's corn setup is different but thats our's

Sorry but i think we will stay where we are..

Im sure a class 6 combine would push a 12 row head...from what ive read and been told...its just asking alot perhaps

but it will do it

Stay with the 9760
 

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we ran a 97 last bean harvest and itwas great but how much greater is it compared to a 9860 or 8010' 480'680' you get my point.
 

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I hear you deereman... You'll never see a manufacterer tell you the real differences in machines as well as the fact you'll never see a comparision of the two (9860Vs.9760) HP is the only real difference. How much cheaper I think the 9860 uses the 12.5L engine and the 9760 uses the
?? 9.0 I think. When they put these machines on the market they are trying hard to play on the ego's of some guys. They know that certain people will own the 9860 just because it's the biggest one they make. I could see justifying the 9860 if you have like 5000 acres to harvest in a pretty short window even then I'm still not sure you'd gain much with the extra ponys. Probably just really slug one badly with that extra horsepower packing it in there when It shouldn't. If the 97's had the same engine (12.5) how hard or costly would it be to buy one and turn it up a little more to get the horsepower if needed????????????????
 

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Even when you have 5000 acres, I dont see whats special about the 9860 vs 9760. You still have the same cleaning capacities except engine hp. If you gave me money to buy either one. Both with same options, I'll take the 9760.
 

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I'm with operaider. Most of the 9860 owners probably have a big ego and are the kind of people that have to be the first one in the county to have the newest and most powerful machine. (I said most not all) My vote is for the 9760. Especially with the flat land. The extra horsepower may help in the 240 bushel corn but is it really worth the extra cost just for that?
 

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I have been told from dealers of both red and green that the guys buying the 8010 and 9860 are usually farming with money not for money. Also see some guys buying bigger combines than the support equipment can handle. Hard to see the need for a combine that can harvest 4000+ bu. an hour when you can only handle 2,000 or so, but i guess if you got a big ego or a big pocketbook then she will look real good setting in the field with a full bin.
 

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Quote:I have been told from dealers of both red and green that the guys buying the 8010 and 9860 are usually farming with money not for money. Also see some guys buying bigger combines than the support equipment can handle. Hard to see the need for a combine that can harvest 4000+ bu. an hour when you can only handle 2,000 or so, but i guess if you got a big ego or a big pocketbook then she will look real good setting in the field with a full bin.



You probably don't have mile long fields. Two grain carts, 3 semis, and a 6,000 bu per hour grain leg. We can cut 40,000 bu a day on good days with our 8010. If it had more sieve area then it would cut more, but then we would need more support equipment. So, I guess it works okay for us. On a per bu basis, we try to get as competive as anyone. We aren't even big farmers compared to a lot of people. I've done the comparison on a custom harvestor coming in. We start cutting dryland corn in early September. Then mid-september we switch to edible beans, do about five hundred acres of edibles on a typical year, then move to wet corn for about two weeks. Once the feed lots shut down the wet corn harvest, then we move to the 20 moisture corn and dry it down, once we hit the 16-17.5 moisture corn, then we start putting it in the bin and taking it to the COOP to fill the HTA contracts. At the end October we are typically getting done with Corn and switching to milo. We normally have to wait another week beofre the last of the milo is dry enough to harvest. Sometimes that week we are waiting for the milo to finish drying down, we switch over to sunflowers that we have double cropped after the wheat harvest.

No custom cutter I know is going to have the patience to deal with us, nor would they even want too. Wet corn, dry corn, edibles, milo, and sunflowers all cut from about the first of September till Thanksgiving. Sounds like a combine lovers dream harvest!!
 

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Hi,

my guess it's all location, location, location.


In Europe we get the same STS with something like 480 hp. And we seem to need everyone. Sure for most areas the higher hp doesn't mean any increase in productivity. But there might be areas were hp does mean something. Or else, where the cleaning area is not the limiting factor.
It sure is odd to see the same basic combine sold as different types, and even have price difference in between. Sounds like price discrimination. But if it pays off for Deere, why shouldn't they. Nobody HAS to buy the 9860. Maybe they shouldn't be advertising it as a true class 8 combine, but well, it's JD.
Gotta give that marketing department something to do.

Sorry, no answer to your original question.

The Wanderer
 

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Quote:Even when you have 5000 acres, I dont see whats special about the 9860 vs 9760. You still have the same cleaning capacities except engine hp. If you gave me money to buy either one. Both with same options, I'll take the 9760.

That is EXACTLY my own thinking, HFH. I really can't see any justifiable reason for such increase in cost, either.
 

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I can understand a guy in (farmboy) situation having an 8010 because up until now case hasn't had a class seven machine. And from what I hear there is a big difference in an 2388 and a 8010 (true class 8) Plus if you have that kind of support equipment and bin setup why not let the big dog eat. A lot of CH's run 9660's and 9760's but very few run 9860's for some odd reason and a lot of them are going through as many acres as anybody is. However, different situations require different equipment. And if your trying to harvest as much acreage as a custom harvester would with 3 class 6 or 7 machines a class 8 would help ease the crunch. Hopefully deere will make necessary changes to make the new 9870 STS a true class 8 so the big boys will have a chance at a combine that has more than just extra horsepower.
 

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the only way i see owning a 9860 is if you have the support equipment to keep it running. whats the point of having a 9860 and having to wait on a grain kart or semis when you can have a 9660 or 9760 and keep running nonstop??
my suggestion if you have the support equipment to keep the machine running go bigger if not stay smaller and keep running all day long
that machine dosent make money if it is sitting for the farmer and custom harvester

-kiley
 

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hey farm boy sounds like you have the support equipment to handle a big machine. how many acres you running? i know some harvester's that would love to put one combine on a job and run everyday for 2 1/2 months. i have harvested 6 different crops in Montana in a month can't say that was a problem. actually was good i cut wheat till late afternoon the go cut canola all night. seemed like most of the fall jobs the farmer wanted more equipment than was really needed.
 

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Anytime someone posts how many acres they farm, there are lots of people who say thats not very many acres and lots of people who say thats way too many acres.

We have very little wheat compared to some, maybe 1200 acres. But fall harvest is pretty big for us. We'll get very very close to a million bu through the machine this year. I'm guessing 950,000.

If we could run every day we could cut our harvest way down. But with breakdowns, moves, flat truck tires, crew has personal time here and there, and crop not quite being ready exactly on time, there are quite a few days we end up working on other projects.

I just thought of another reason we don't run a custom harvest crew, what would me and my guys do for 2 and a half months? I actually enjoy the harvest, its what you put all the hard hours in for during the year. An irrigated farm is much much different than farms in Iowa. Much more labor intensive.

What are the costs of custom harvesting these days, maybe I should do another analysis? Our avg. haul is around 15 miles round trip, figure 850,000 guaranteed fall bu. What would the bill be on that? We may have to post this discussion on another subject somewhere? Is harvesting 17, 16, 15 cents? I think the last time I priced it, it was 16,16, 16. Catch you cats later.
 
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