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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all! new guy here. looking to buy 470, 470R or 480. want any and all opinions/experiences on one or all three. Farm 2700 acres in SW Saskatchewan (peas,wheat,durum,barley and occasionally canola). Dryland farm with ave. wheat yields 35-40 bus/ac. and hot/dry harvest conditions, usually.
Currently run JD 9600. Size not an issue as we're looking to do custom work too, unless the 480 is just too big to keep full. Will run 36' draper. Looking for feedback on support equipment as well. Are 2 semis enough or do we need to look into a grain cart to use the combine to full efficiency? Most of our land is within 3-4 miles of home or bins. . Thanx in advance
 

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A 480 has huge capacity compared to all other class 8 combines currently available. The 470 was a class 6 with 290hp, but with impressive capacity compared to class 7's. The 470R was a class 7 released in 2001 with 340hp form a C9 HEUI CAT engine. It was also what some might call a test bed for the 500 series using a hybrid threshing/separating system very much close to the very successful system currently being used in the 500R's. If currently running a 9600, I'd choose the 470R. It has a lot of power and capacity for its size.
 

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The lexions and the 400 series in particular do not shine in hot dry conditions. We ran a 480 for 3 years, then a 480r for 3 and we now have a 590. Great combines, untouchable in tough conditions, the 590 struggled when doing super dry winter wheat (10% moisture), the 480(r) was even worse. You will be disappointed with a 470/470r in really dry wheat. I would demo one first. I'm not trying to talk you out of one, I mean we're into our third machine now and are amazed at the capacity of the 590, easily 20% more then the 480r. I'm just trying to caution you. If I were you and you were leaning towards a 470, then I might also try a 9650/9660sts, you can get them for a reasonable price, stick a chip in it and you have a 9750/9760sts. I think they will outperform a 470/470r in dry conditions. They won't touch a 480, but it has a much wider body then the 470.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
we probably are leaning more towards a 470R than a 470/480. According to the brochures, there's more of a difference between the 400 series to the 400R's, than the 400R's to the 500 series. Is it true that the R's run a steeper angle on the rotors compared to the straight 400 series? that's what our dealer told us. also, is it a big job to change from a corn/bean machine to a small grains? What does a guy all have to change?
Reasons we're leaning towards a Cat:
1.Price is probably the biggest issue when comparing a Cat to a Deere. In comparing prices on the net, it seems the Deere's are at least 20k more for the same class.
2.Also we haven't supported our local Deere dealer for years except in emergencies, and instead buy our parts from another Deere dealer who is 40 miles futher (have a tendancy to soak guys pretty good).
3.My dad has always liked the Cats ever since they came out and especially likes the APS (get more than one shot at threshing, hoping to get a better sample with less cracking, especially in edible peas, where you get docked for having splits, and are very hard to handle w/o doing that) He's tired of watching the Harvestrack, limited to what the walkers can do.
We do fight with tough conditions too, this year was an exception though. It was 95-100 F and no humidity, even our 9600 could go in the wheat
Usually it's 75-90 F and 30-50% humidity. It's not uncommon to be combining here now (temp 50-70 F) so we want something that can thresh when called upon. thanx both for your info so far
 

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The big difference is between the 400/400Rs and the 500 series. The 480r was identical to the 480 except for horsepower, a few changes in the cab, and the variable speed rotors. The 470r does have the new style rotors, but other than that and the horsepower bump, I think its identical to the 470 (correct me if I'm wrong). There is nothing wrong with a 470/470r, but if you can find a 480 for a reasonable price then I would go with it instead, you would not believe the difference in capacity you get from the wide body. The underrated 460 walker machine is also worth looking at, its a wide body machine like the 480 and has the same capacity in canola, but uses less fuel.
The lexions are great in peas, nice sample and if you eat a rock, you hardly do any damage, its unbeleivable!
 

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You won't be happy with a 470 - esp if typically harvest in dry conditions. We couldn't keep the grain in.
480R is a good machine - can't say too much about it except that parts are expensive - but if you buy out of the US would be much cheaper than Kramer parts.
I would be more concerned about resale rather than purchase price - its too bad, but if you buy a cat you might be married to it! To be sure, phone some out of area dealers, ask them what they would give you for this machine on trade for a different one. Youll be hard pressed to find someone that would take on trade, let alone give a respectable price...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
we're not concerned about being married, most of the equipment we buy usually dies here. we have a nice row of deceased equipment in the back. If we find something we like, we keep it, and from reading some posts on here, it seems like a Cat is a good way to go. does anyone know the track record of Nebraska Machine Company? there are some very intresting combines there. do they lease/rent combines out, or are they that big of a dealer?
 
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