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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have a R60 and not the cleanest machine we have had....was wondering how to tell when the accelerator rolls need changed and how important are they for clean samples. Any advice on changing them would help also.
 

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Generally when you can stick a pencil or something similar between the rolls they are in need of replacement. I have personally seen them way worse, but the machines were not doing a very good job cleaning. They are vital to cleaning as they force crop across the air blast.

To change them put a piece of plywood on the sieve and crawl in there.
 

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When they are needed to be replaced, replace them with PFP's stainless steel lugs. I have 3,000 acres of crop ran through mine and they show zero wear. It will be the last time you will ever replace accell rolls as long as you own the machine.
 

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fourwheelone, did that on my 1985 N6 last summer. Some of the original lug bolts on the rolls had been replaced with bolts and nuts. That means remove entire roll assemblies to access the nuts. Replaced all lug rolls with the PFP stainless. Drilled out all of the remaining original lug bolts and replaced with all new thru bolts and nuts. More detailed description on the 'Considering N6 yes or no post' on this forum.
Not cheap, 2man job and decision to be made is the repair cost versus is the machine worth it or is it scrap time??? Suggest check the cost and time and make the decision on wether to repair or scrap for a better machine. If you have good metal rolls to continue with the lug bolts and the machine is a keeper then the plywood over the sieves is workable solution. If not then what is the value of the R60 when repaired? Stainless lugs, bolts bearings, labor, miscelllaneous parts etc, if the metal rolls themselves are bad (not likely) the price goes way up to repair or search scrap yards for useable metal rolls shafts to work with.
On my new N6 as I recall it totalled a full days work start to stop for 2 unfamiliar people, 1st timers. Also ruined about 2,000 frogskins when all totalled but I think it was worth it since the rest of the N6 is in above average condition. My problem was rodents had wintered on the left side made a nest and ate a large section of the rubber lugs.
Good luck with your R60 and the decision on which way to go. As redline 73 said I think those stainless lugs will last a long time. Thats unless rodents decide they want to eat stainless steel or a big metal object or sex stone goes into the rolls and destroys things a bit.
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon (just kicked back and awatchin the weeds grow here on the bad end of starvation flats)
 

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It seems some favor the metal lugs. I can understand them not wearing out but I would have some other concerns. Is there a good reason why does AGCO not use metal? Wouldn't they cause a lot more grain damage? It also seems if they started getting slightly out of time the rubber would be far more forgiving than metal if they start to hit each other. Could this be why metal lugs are not original equipment? Just some thoughts.
 

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I cut peas with the stainless lugs without slowing the clean grain elevator down. The peas are 3x more fragile than edible beans and my splits were not out of control and barely noticeable. The lugs are more gentle the rubber since it allows for more space/grain between the lugs. The reason agco hasnt gone to stainless is because they have manufactured so many of the rubber ones. The S8's are supposed to have polyethelene rolls which originated @ PFP. Im sure within 3-5 years all transverse machines will have the option of stainless rolls from the factory. Some dealers are installing the stainless ones on all R's and S's when they come in with worn out rolls. I run poly's on the rear shaft and stainless on the front.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So do they make a big difference on cleaning of grain??? what about discharge side of rotor just before mat goes to chopper and on out i have some holes in the rotor shell or screen, a couple of the one inch squares are broken out. would this leave dirt down onto grain augers and accelerator rolls
 

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Just go to a hardware store and purchase some keystock. They work perfect for patching up the cage. As far as the rolls they dont clean the grain better, but they do allow for more grain to fit in between the lugs limiting contact with grain on the rolls.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So worn rolls would crack grain more than having anything to do with cleaning???? Beans are tough to get clean unless super dry. under 13% In corn broken cobs to the point of overloading shoe. concave clearance and speed dont seem to make a difference. Always a dirty sample
 

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My experience with worn rolls, is that you get more loss out the shoe, as it can not accelerate the crop as well, so the fan blows it out the back along with the trash.

The less cleaning comes into play, when you slow the fan down trying to stop the loss.
 
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