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When you say cheap, I'm guessing you mean something other than a diaphragm pump and the valve adapter with core ejector, which even a low quality set up I believe will run you around a grand. Personally I have never seen anything but a diaphragm pump used, needs to be able to pump both ways and handle the corrosive nature of the calcium chloride. I suppose there are ways of doing it, but if you value your time, I'd just go with the proper set up. One thing to remember, those diaphragm pumps take a fair amount of air volume to operate.

I put my set up together myself, as in sourced and purchased the components separately. Was several years ago, and was well under a thousand back then, however with some care and maintenance, everything is still working and good, so if you get quality stuff and look after it, it will last you a very long time.
 

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I think it's a time issue. There shouldn't be pressure in the tire so it's just a matter of how long you want to wait to get the job done. One of my neighbors had the chloride solution in a barrel and just hoisted the barrel up and let gravity do its thing. The tire dealer uses a pump because it's faster and it can pump either way. If he needs to empty the tire to change a tube, he needs to pump it dry first.
 

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I think it's a time issue. There shouldn't be pressure in the tire so it's just a matter of how long you want to wait to get the job done. One of my neighbors had the chloride solution in a barrel and just hoisted the barrel up and let gravity do its thing. The tire dealer uses a pump because it's faster and it can pump either way. If he needs to empty the tire to change a tube, he needs to pump it dry first.
Hello RM-MN
When I was a teen, with all the free time on my hands & not a care in the world, I put a pair of 15.5x38's on my Dad's tractor. I rotated the valve to the top, took the core out, put a hose over the stem, rotated it to the bottom & let the jack down. This forced the fluid out & into a barrel. To get it back in, I tried hoisting it up & let gravity do it's job. This was too slow, so I put some of the fluid in an old water pressure tank & pressurized the tank with air, forcing the fluid out at a rapid pace. This setup cost me $0.00 to buy as I used stuff that was just kicking around. I washed everything out with water & let it dry out & used it again at a later date.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When I say 'cheap' - I mean that I only handle fluid filled tires a few times - not really worthy of spending a grand on a pump.

I use the gravity method - super slow though - was hoping someone had a 'princess auto' special throw away type tool to use to speed the process up for the few times I do it.
 

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you need a way to get the air out of the tube as you fill the tire with fluid. valve stem at the top pump fluid in for a bit, then stop pumping and let air bleed out and then start pumping again.

if this is a one time thing I would just hire the tire guy to come mess with it. probably cheaper and you can still be doing other stuff.
 

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Go buy one of those cheap pumps that goes onto your hand drill. The garden hose will fit over the valve stem. I have used this a few times. Is a bit slow. Does pump both ways. Have to pump a few gallons in and than let the pressure out and than continue pumping again. If the pump ceases up that ok because they only cost around 15 bucks.
 

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When you say cheap, I'm guessing you mean something other than a diaphragm pump and the valve adapter with core ejector, which even a low quality set up I believe will run you around a grand. Personally I have never seen anything but a diaphragm pump used, needs to be able to pump both ways and handle the corrosive nature of the calcium chloride. I suppose there are ways of doing it, but if you value your time, I'd just go with the proper set up. One thing to remember, those diaphragm pumps take a fair amount of air volume to operate.

I put my set up together myself, as in sourced and purchased the components separately. Was several years ago, and was well under a thousand back then, however with some care and maintenance, everything is still working and good, so if you get quality stuff and look after it, it will last you a very long time.
X2

Here I can pay for my pump setup with only a couple call outs. Especially since with my luck 95% of my repairs are during a holiday or weekend.:rolleyes:
 

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At one time I had to always be taking fuel out of snowmobile gas tanks so I could flip them over to work on the chassis.

You can take a 1/4 inch pipe thread galvanized Tee, then attach a hose on to the side port and connect it to the liquid to be moved and a second hose to one of the end ports dumping into a container. Then screw a male quick coupler for an air hose into the third port on the end of the Tee. Then hook on an air hose, the fluid will all transfer quickly because of the venturi effect created inside the Tee.

Using it to put the fluid back in the tire would be problematic because both air and fluid would be entering the tire, but it still may be workable if you keep letting the air out.

The bigger you can keep the hoses the faster it will flow because the pressure differential of the venturi is only effected by the air volume.

Don't do this near ignition sources with gasoline or alcohol.
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It's funny how things come back to you. I was wondering why Murphy's law hadn't blown me up while transferring fuel with that venturi. Suddenly I recalled that I use to attach it to the vent inlet of a fuel jug and push a heater hose over the end of the pour spout and stick it in the fuel tank to be vacuumed out.
 
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