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Looking like wheat will be coming off wet this year. Just had 7 inches of rain and wheat was about ready to go. My question is my this: My Dad whom passed away so I can't ask him has a small white aeration tube with a small red fan that connects to the top of the tube and I assume sucks air up through the tube and past the fan? We have small grain bins (About 1300 bushel if filled to the peak). Will the small tube and fan dry wheat if it is taken off the field at say 15 moisture or are these things for something else. Not sure what or if he ever used it but I can see things being a nightmare for me this year even though I don't farm a lot. Any information is appreciated. Thanks!
 

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Those fans you are talking about are only about 1/3 hp, wouldn't dry grain but probably keep the grain for a while till you have a chance to move or dry it.
 

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No, those B&W tubes are worthless for drying, better than no aeration at all though, one tube per 200 bu. is all i.m.o.
 

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Tubes work well in big bins when grain is stored at hi temps, it keeps core temps in line, as for hi moisture grain drying, it might give you a few more weeks till it needs to be moved, but that's about it I feel
 

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I've used those tubes successfully to dry wheat although I used 2 to bring 18% wheat down to 14. Run them all day long as the metal bin heats up the air so it can accept more moisture. Keep all bin doors open if it doesn't look like rain to help get rid of the mointure the aerator removes. i had about 1000 bushels in a 2500 bushel bin.
 

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If those tubes are less than 12" and the motor is only 1/3 hp it's ability to dry will be questionable even in a 1300 bu bin unless you get lots of really warm dry weather. It might be time to look at a more dependable unit. Obviously there's lots of full floor units out there with big fans but I'm thinking that might be more than you want to spend on a small bin. Half round above floor vents are an option, but they are a pain to clean out around. I've used All-size above floor vents for years with good results but I don't think they make them any more. Similar idea to the half rounds, but more triangular shaped. The only problem I have with those is that the original bin entrance was only a 6" round pipe, so now I have to make my own entrances for the 9 x 14 fans. If we combine in Aug, I start binning at 18% moisture, and I've used 3 and 5 hp fans for up to 21 ft bins and 4400 bu. With canola I start at 10% and aereate until I cool it regardless of moisture. Often it takes longer to cool it than dry it. Years ago there was a guy with a story in farm show magazine that used a flat entrance on one wall... like a register to get the incoming air into the bin. With a good moisture proof vent to exhaust the wet air, I bet that would work fine for your 1300 bu bins. I just use a couple sections of strait above floor to get the air in. Once it's in, the grain determines the air flow, not the vents. For the 19 and 21ft bins I use more vents and configure them in an X or a Y to get more even air flow, but the 14ft ones are pretty easy to aereate. There's a new concept being floated around now that says you should blow the air into wall vents, and exhaust out a center vent (maybe a use for your existing system?) which makes a lot of sense. The big limitation to aereation is outside humidity and condensation on the bin walls when temperatures start to drop. The condensation would be less of an issue with the wall entry concept.
 

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We have a few of those tubes and motors and us them mainly for when we have grain piles or fill th quanset. You put them in the top Of the peaks and they are for ventilating the heat and humidity out of the grain. In (grain) piles the top of the peaks of wheat usually heat first as the grain cools in the fall. The grain comes off the field warm from the heat of the day and the evenings are cool and as the grain cools the heat and moisture migrates to the Center of the peak creating a hot spot and extra moisture.

If it is borderline dry to tough you can help keep the wheat from spoiling with the little fans but we don't think they will dry the grain at all. They only prevent hot spots from forming.
Remember temperature is just as important as the moisture content and these little tubes help bring the temp down faster.
 

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Our tubes have little auger strips on the end of it and you put a bar thru the holes in the top of it to screw it in to the grain then mount the fan on it after it is buried. It's a lot easier to do this right after you finish filling the pile or bin before the grain settles.
Some times we will thread in the tube and let it ventilate without the fan if there is no power close by and that works if your worried about it.
We also use metal rods in the grain to keep a eye on the grain temperature.
 
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