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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys we are wanting to go from our 30' 1890 JD NT air drill to a 40' air drill. We have looked at CNH's 500 40' air, and Mother Deere's 1890 40'. Like the JD better just because I'm use to it.

I've looked into crustbuster all-plant air drills. can't get a while lot of info on those yet.

We need 7.5" spacing and 350 bushel cart or bigger. Wheat, Milo (run fert in the off row) and soys.

Just wanted to hear from ya'll your feeling on the CNH or crustbuster, heck even JD.

Thanks,
JK
 

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My land lord ran a the case 2 years ago, he didn't farm last year but I like the design of it, the smaller disc blade and lighter frame was a good move in my mind, I find some interest in that para link type system they have on it. I personally think it is a pretty good seeding tool but I think you would be disappointed in the cart compared to the Deere, unless deere has recently upgraded augers the case one is way better but the serviceability is a joke compared to Deere to me
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I got a quote from Percision Ag on grease banks for the John Deere to do a 40 foot air seeder $9600... I noticed that CNH 500s only have one grease zerk per row. Deere 3.. So may save 10,000 and go red..
 

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The Case P-500s lack in-furrow seed firming. This can be disastrous in central KS. I have clients who are very competent at adjusting seeders, but failed to get a stand of soybeans with a stock P-500 and had to go back in with their JD 1890 to reseed (and got a stand), despite no rain. I did warn them about the P-500 . . . .

We (Exapta) do have a fix for this, but it involves Keetons & Mojo wires. On a drill, I'd rather use something more robust and foolproof -- such as a seed-lock wheel, which the Deere 50/60/90 has. As much as I love the residue-cutting ability of the P-500, its major shortfalls in the seed firming and furrow-closing department make me cringe.
 

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That's interesting Matt because the guys we raise seed wheat with traded their sdx in on a p500 and stand relusts were excellent in wheat. Almost all non airseeders lack in furrow firming unless they have Keaton's. To me the consistent depth control of the parallel link far offsets the lack of firming wheels, but our conditions are different out in western kansas, and we seed over terraces. My vote is for the case, better design then the deere. If you really like the deere cart run it on a pd500 tool bar.
 

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Matt is this stuff needed in Western Canada for spring seeding? I have a clay-loam soil and rarely am dry in spring. I fall band my fertilizer and typically harrow ahead so there would be some loose soil in spring. I bought a P2080(CaseIH 500). I suppose if I should ever seed winter wheat in fall it may be of more benefit???

How hard is it to install/un-install the parts and what is the cost per row? Thanks
It is less critical in cool, moist conditions such as Canada. Also, you have far better soils than in Ks. There is still an advantage to doing seed firming and furrow closing as separate steps, but it's not nearly as crucial compared to farther south.

Cost per row is on our website. I don't want this to become an advertisement. I simply mentioned what we had in case it solves a problem for some of the readers.
 

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That's interesting Matt because the guys we raise seed wheat with traded their sdx in on a p500 and stand relusts were excellent in wheat. Almost all non airseeders lack in furrow firming unless they have Keaton's. To me the consistent depth control of the parallel link far offsets the lack of firming wheels, but our conditions are different out in western kansas, and we seed over terraces. My vote is for the case, better design then the deere. If you really like the deere cart run it on a pd500 tool bar.
The P500 may well have been an improvement for your neighbors, since the SDX had so many issues (and most of them had the seed-lock wheels omitted in later years). Not to mention luck in any given year in getting a stand -- maybe they had more moisture for their P-500 than they did when they had their SDX. In most aspects, the P-500 fixes a lot of the silliness in the SDX design, but the omission of a seed-lock wheel was a really bad idea for selling them in USA. Not to mention that their packer wheel doesn't close the furrow most of the time, not even if it has 150 lbs of pressure on it -- Case does admit they have a problem here.
Depth control may be irrelevant if you don't press the seed into moisture, and close the furrow in an acceptable way.
There are hundreds of Deere 50/60/90 drills that go over terraces throughout Ks, and the terraces in the eastern half the state are waaayyy nastier to seed over. Granted, there may be skips, because that opener has almost no downward travel. But most of the time it is good enough to not bother with seeding the direction of the terraces.
To say that the P-500 is "a better design" than the JD 50/60/90 is a bit of a stretch. In some regards, yes, vastly better (residue cutting; going down into depressions). In some regards, vastly worse (seed firming). And I'm completely color-blind -- I just want the damned drills to get a top-notch stand in continuous no-till every time we go to the field. We don't yet get that from either Deere or Case, and not anyone else either.
No love for the JD carts. Flexi-coil (Case-IH) has better technology in the metering and air stream.
respectfully,
 

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Almost all non airseeders lack in furrow firming unless they have Keaton's.
Not sure what exactly you mean by this. Deere 50/60/90 drills (both box drills and air drills) have always had an in-furrow seed-lock wheel as standard equipment. No other drill mfgr has gotten that part right. Case's SDX had seed-lock wheels as standard equipment in the early years, but later they became optional.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Matt we do all from no-till to conventional farming ( the old man still wants to stir the dirt) but have done some vertical tillage with our landoll vt. I only work it once usually about a month after harvest. And then burn it down till wheat planting. Till about three years ago we were very continuous wheat. But I've gotten very diversified in these past few years and have gone more no-till. I have a full time job and time is money for me. We have done some business with Exapta with our 1770 nt. very nice folks to work with!!
 

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Matt,

Why do you consider a seed lock wheel superior to a Keaton on a drill?
It's more trouble-free, more robust. Can get 20 lbs of firming pressure from them, vs 'only' 10 lbs with Ktn + Mojo. No-till drills often run in tougher conditions than planters.
 

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Matt we do all from no-till to conventional farming ( the old man still wants to stir the dirt) but have done some vertical tillage with our landoll vt. I only work it once usually about a month after harvest. And then burn it down till wheat planting. Till about three years ago we were very continuous wheat. But I've gotten very diversified in these past few years and have gone more no-till. I have a full time job and time is money for me. We have done some business with Exapta with our 1770 nt. very nice folks to work with!!
Thanks for the compliment!
In a tilled seedbed, the stock P-500 probably performs reasonably well.
 

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The Case P-500s lack in-furrow seed firming. This can be disastrous in central KS. I have clients who are very competent at adjusting seeders, but failed to get a stand of soybeans with a stock P-500 and had to go back in with their JD 1890 to reseed (and got a stand), despite no rain. I did warn them about the P-500 . . . .

We (Exapta) do have a fix for this, but it involves Keetons & Mojo wires. On a drill, I'd rather use something more robust and foolproof -- such as a seed-lock wheel, which the Deere 50/60/90 has. As much as I love the residue-cutting ability of the P-500, its major shortfalls in the seed firming and furrow-closing department make me cringe.
There is a fix for the guys that feel they need the seed lock wheel. I have been running a prototype for the past few years and they do an excellent job. Not everyone needs them!
 
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