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Distilled water versus RO water aren't so much different from each other as the process used to make the water pure are different. The more pure you make water, the more aggressive it is. In essence, pure water is a near perfect universal solvent. So yes, it would begin to dissolve steel from a steel tank. In research (NOT commercial or production of commodity) very specialized highly controlled distillation of water has made water so pure they were able to begin to detect molecules of the pyrex glass containers in the water! It somewhat depends on what impurities are in the water to begin with and what ones you want to take out. Getting a distillation system to work anywhere near as well as that one in research is very expensive, and operating an RO filter becomes the better solution. RO does a better job on certain things like chlorine that tend to get carried away in the steam in distillation and therefore condense with it and remain with the water.


Having said all that, once you mix it with the antifreeze, it's non pure water anymore and shouldn't be an issue. You want to start clean. The corrosion inhibitors will do their thing, the water doesn't remain as pure as right out of the RO system. Now if you put straight RO in your rad, you wouldn't want to leave it for long.
 

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Anyone ever use Evans waterless coolant? Supposed to last forever.

I put it in an old pickup I rebuilt. Pretty expensive to do a tractor or large capacity cooling system. Touted as reducing cavitation on the cylinder cooling jackets.
 

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Anyone ever use Evans waterless coolant? Supposed to last forever.

I put it in an old pickup I rebuilt. Pretty expensive to do a tractor or large capacity cooling system. Touted as reducing cavitation on the cylinder cooling jackets.
A friend has an older Volvo single axle truck that was always running hot. Problem #1 fixed by getting the rad totally cleaned. Then he added Evans because it is more efficient at carrying heat away than ethylene glycol. That truck runs cool now. A 50/50 mix of ethylene glycol is only 90% as efficient at removing heat as pure water. But you need the corrosion protection so can't do that. Anyone know about Dowtherm? It has been around since the 60s and is not glycol. What was it's claim to fame? Not compatible with glycol again.
 

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I was always under the impression antifreeze was better at cooling, but alas at 200 degrees it has 17 percent less heat holding capacity then pure water.

Thx Transaxial!
Antifreeze has a higher boiling point. At my university tractor club we had a case that would boil off the water during parades but antifreeze was fine. Tough to cool anything after it evaporates.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Test strip were fairly easy to find, found an Auto Value store selling packs with 4 strip in each and the reference card. The QSX looks fine but the 350 Cummins in the old truck needs some supplemental. Looks like I will put on a new filter which would be the WIX 24071 with one unit of SCA in it. Since my test strip says 1 pint /4 gallons and I guess at 12 gallons cooling capacity I should add two more 1 pint (473 ml) bottles of SCA and then run the truck for a few days then retest.


So another question, I see reference to SCA-2 and SCA-4. I think - 4 was mentioned for Cummins engines but are we talking 40 year old ones or say new generations?
 

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Don that sounds easy but I decided a long time ago that any new piece of motorized equipment on my farm was going to get proprietary oil/grease/antifreeze/etc. There is no way I am risking a warranty issue on a $XXX,XXX.XX piece of equipment over a few bucks on antifreeze. I also don't understand(or care to understand) all these little details enough to chase this type of savings. It may work fine but I can't be sure.:wink:
 

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A friend has an older Volvo single axle truck that was always running hot. Problem #1 fixed by getting the rad totally cleaned. Then he added Evans because it is more efficient at carrying heat away than ethylene glycol. That truck runs cool now. A 50/50 mix of ethylene glycol is only 90% as efficient at removing heat as pure water. But you need the corrosion protection so can't do that. Anyone know about Dowtherm? It has been around since the 60s and is not glycol. What was it's claim to fame? Not compatible with glycol again.
I think the claim to fame for dowtherm was that if you had a liner leak into the oil it wouldn't take out your bearings .
 

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We changed the antifreeze on our quadtrack this year as it was getting up to 2500 hours and had a neighbor have a iveco engine go down because the antifreeze had eaten a hole through the liner and get into the oil and basically destroy the bearings . Cost them 25000.00 or thereabouts for a new engine . Put in the orange long life diesel antifreeze as there is no filter on the engine so didn't want to have to piss around with SCA as it isn't in the extended life AF .
 

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Antifreeze has a higher boiling point. At my university tractor club we had a case that would boil off the water during parades but antifreeze was fine. Tough to cool anything after it evaporates.
You bring up a good point. I don't know about ethylene glycol but that was one of the advantages of running Evans. It raised the boiling point of the coolant by something like 25 degrees F. That increase in Delta T( temp differential of water leaving engine vs returning) could make the difference for an engine cooling or not. So if you can increase the boiling point of the coolant to say 220 degrees F , you increase the heat transfer at the radiator, which increases the Delta T. For example if Delta T increases from 10 degrees to 20 degrees F, cooling capacity doubles, all other things being equal. The other thing is cooling system pressure increasing boiling point. 3 degree F increase in boiling point for every 1 psi increase. EG. A 15 psi cap increases boiling point by 45 degrees F.

Joe, what was your comment about not using Evans ?
 

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I think the problem with most high boiling point coolant formulations is that they are dramatically poorer in transferring heat from metal than water is. In fact they are about four times worse. Therefor most coolant formulations in practical use include water as a compromise to increase the heat transfer capacity of the coolant.

High boing point coolants are essentially just waterless coolants causing high cylinder wall and actual head metal temperatures because the coolant can not absorb the heat as efficiently. They might not boil until the coolant is three times as hot, which the waterless coolant usually can’t achieve because of its natural inefficiency. It has the exact same problem releasing its heat back into the aluminium metal of the radiator.

Race cars almost always have pure water in them under very high pressurization to increase the boiling point and achieve colder critical engine components.

This is 1945 data, but still relevant.

https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a801100.pdf
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You bring up a good point. I don't know about ethylene glycol but that was one of the advantages of running Evans. It raised the boiling point of the coolant by something like 25 degrees F. That increase in Delta T( temp differential of water leaving engine vs returning) could make the difference for an engine cooling or not. So if you can increase the boiling point of the coolant to say 220 degrees F , you increase the heat transfer at the radiator, which increases the Delta T. For example if Delta T increases from 10 degrees to 20 degrees F, cooling capacity doubles, all other things being equal. The other thing is cooling system pressure increasing boiling point. 3 degree F increase in boiling point for every 1 psi increase. EG. A 15 psi cap increases boiling point by 45 degrees F.

Joe, what was your comment about not using Evans ?

Well for one it’s just about impossible to clean the system well enough to put Evans in and it not start to turn black and get acidic.

Then it starts to corrode and anodize your aluminum parts.

You can’t just get it everywhere so if your down or have a leak your not just adding water to the system to top up and adjust later.

The cost is insane for absolutely no benefit to a healthy well designed system.
 

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Well for one it’s just about impossible to clean the system well enough to put Evans in and it not start to turn black and get acidic.

Then it starts to corrode and anodize your aluminum parts.

You can’t just get it everywhere so if your down or have a leak your not just adding water to the system to top up and adjust later.

The cost is insane for absolutely no benefit to a healthy well designed system.
Yepp never really had a problem with glycol antifreeze either LL or regular . If you do some cooling system maintenance once in a while ( change your coolant ) All the systems have a lot of additional capacity for that engine's horsepower . Now if you want to really hop up the power then it could be a different story . But I would think that another 30% could be done before you would be looking at another row of coolant tubes in the rad or even a larger rad . We try to change antifreeze at regular times but it usually is when a hose or water pump needs changing on most equipment -- try to keep with manufacturer times on the newer equipment .
 

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The other thing is cooling system pressure increasing boiling point. 3 degree F increase in boiling point for every 1 psi increase. EG. A 15 psi cap increases boiling point by 45 degrees F.
But...
Does the increased internal system pressure have any effect on heat transference efficiency?
 

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But...
Does the increased internal system pressure have any effect on heat transference efficiency?

I believe that answer would be no and yes.

Since it is impossible to compress a fluid it’s density won’t increase with pressure so there is no increase of fluid mass to accept heat transfer.

However very high system pressures reduce tiny localized boiling locations in cylinder heads near the exhaust passages and on cylinder walls offering some heat transfer efficiency increases.

Another way to skin the cat is with modest system pressurization along with a restricted outflow to the radiator and a high pressure high performance water pump impeller and body to mechanically induce a high pressure on the engine’s water jacket only but not the rest of the cooling system. It’s seldom done because in its simplest form it requires tuning the engine coolant outflow rate.
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