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Discussion Starter #1
I've got a 70'x50' quonset shop that we'd like to remove from it's foundation and move about a half mile to a new location (assume no issues with power lines and roads). If the door in the end was bridged across to keep the sides from spreading, could it be moved in one piece? Currently the opening has an overhead door that could be uninstalled (or left in place if it was possible). The original sliding doors are long gone. The other idea we had was to unbolt it into sections and move each section. That would require a way to tie the bottom of each section together. As a last resort the entire shop could be disassembled, but we'd like to avoid that if we could.

Has anyone on here had any experience moving a building like this?
 

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Lucyk building movers can move a quonset they hauled one past our place a few years ago. lucykmovers.com
 

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Seen them moved in one piece, several pieces and even completely taken apart. A competent and properly equipped mover can move one complete easily.
If you take it in sections, then you just need a picker with a spreader bar, I've seen up to 10 foot sections at a time, take out a few bolts down from top on each side in middle of section, this is where you attach chains that hook onto spreader bar. You lay the sections on edge to haul them. Works easier to lay them on a trailer than on the ground without bending or buckling them. Taking the complete building apart works too but lots of work and things never go back together quite the same even when all marked.
Biggest issue with a quonset is the mount to the foundation, thats not coming out and some older buildings have had additional concrete poured and need to be cut off as you can no longer access the bolts. And if it is an older building, not likely that plate available so you need to bastardize some kind of mount for the new foundations as there is many different pitches and more of the ribs.
 

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If you decide to go through with the move I saw what one neighbor did when he built his Quonset.
It was probably the last one built in the area in the late '90s.
He poured a 2ft high grade beam on top of the foundation to give more height and this allows parking equipment closer to the wall.
I thought it was a decent idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Good ideas and point. Thanks. Will have a closer look at the bottom plate. The foundation wall sticks up a few inches above the current dirt line, and there's no cement poured on top of the plate and foundation. The building was put up in the 60s, but I think the bottom plate is accessible. I'm pretty sure the bolts can be cut off and the plate should come free from the concrete.

The new location will have an additional 2 feet of side wall so we can make the door taller.

We built a Behlen quonset-style shop about 20 years ago, and it's on 4' walls, which does let us park things closer to the walls. The new shop is going to be straight walled, from Prairie Steel. Their price was not that much higher than an equivalent wood frame.
 

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We moved a wooden quonset (36x60) 2 winters ago. Was a lot of head scratching but got the 4 miles home in one piece. Only cost were the spikes to nail the timbers. Then new tin in the next summer.

There’s a lot of outward force along the bottom. We spanned the bottom with power poles and ran cables across to keep it from springing outwards.

Not sure if there’s much difference in tackling a steel one versus a wooden one

Made a YouTube video of the move if you want to check it out. If the link doesn’t work, search YouTube for ‘quonset move’

https://youtu.be/bv07aQMKx8M
 

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For anyone interested, b we ended up hiring a house moving company to come move our Quonset last winter. It took them a couple days to load and unload it, and about 20 min for the actual move, which was just across the road and a half mile away. We lifted the building onto new 4' walls, so it's much more spacious feeling now, we can park sprayers and other remember right up close to the walls now.

Kinda fun to see a big shop driving across the field.

Here's a video. https://youtu.be/b3GEA-YzRro
 

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We did the same thing, big mistake moved our 50x70 quonshed.
Did it in 2011 till this day i wish we woulda burned the **** thing.

All cost added together for concrete, new roof and moving cost for another 35k i woulda build a brand new 60x140.

Big mistake. Quonshets are **** even put on a sidewall to lift building your still hitting the fkn roof.
 
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